Media watch – Thursday

26 July 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

Previous Post

20 Comments

  1. sorethumb

     /  July 26, 2018

    ON MAY 17TH, Geert Wilders, a far-right Dutch politician, announced that he would hold a contest to draw the best cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad, whom many Sunni Muslims and Ahmadi Muslims believe should not be visually depicted, in the spirit of free speech. In doing so, he only further entrenched himself as an enemy of free speech rather than its saviour.

    In the 1919 case Schenck v United States, the US Supreme Court held that free speech did not give someone the right to falsely shout “fire” in a crowded theatre. One century later I feel that Mr Wilders’s proposed cartoon competition should fall into the same category. This is because modern communications have dramatically expanded that hypothetical theatre. Laws must adapt accordingly, not to prevent freedom of speech but to safeguard it. It is a perception shared by the British government’s House of Commons Home Affairs Committee 2017 report on abuse, hate and extremism online.

    Mr Wilders’s attacks on Muslims, Islam and the Holy Prophet Muhammad have harmful consequences, just as they would if Jews or members of a racial minority were targeted. The unjustified spread of violence made possible by social media only serves to aggravate these consequences.

    The number of actual participants in the cartoon competition is unlikely to be very large. But I feel that is beside the point. The competition is about propaganda. Mr Wilders has built a successful, opportunistic political career on anti-Islam statements and poorly disguised prejudice. With 800,000 followers on Twitter, his actions and statements also have reach far beyond the Netherlands. The cartoon competition has only one purpose: to unite far right individuals into his anti-Islam cause. It has little to do with free speech.

    https://www.economist.com/open-future/2018/07/24/should-geert-wilderss-cartoon-contest-be-protected-by-free-speech

    • Gezza

       /  July 26, 2018

      What a load of baloney that author is spouting. Muhummad was a bloody fraud & the core beliefs of the nonsense in the Quran – as well as a lot of the crap in the Hadith show that Islam is as every bit as big a load of shite as the other two Abrahamic religions it drew on & pervertec even more. No sane, rational person can believe this religion deserves anything but scorn for the indoctrinated unfortunates who believe it. All 3 deserve to be mocked. They are all the cause of misery & destruction.

      Christianity has had its day, finally done what good it was ever capable of doing, & if some educated people who suspend their rationality to believe the nonsense in any of the Jaweh-derived children’s stories still need the fear of eternal torture to make them behave humanely towards their fellow man & woman & whatever blimmin gender-benders there are now, there’s just something bloody wrong with them.

      • sorethumb

         /  July 26, 2018

        Christianity has had its day,……. Is one of Jordan Peterson’s themes as in Nietze says “God is dead and we have killed him. But what will we replace him with….. Stalin…… Now progressivism …. invent ideas such as be blind to race and ethnicity and nationalism One demographer, who does not want to be named for fear of being called racist, says: ‘It’s a matter of pure arithmetic that, if nothing else happens, non-Europeans will become a majority and whites a minority in the UK. That would probably be the first time an indigenous population has voluntarily become a minority in its historic homeland’. …. Same geographic territory, larger population, different people = better?

        • Gezza

           /  July 26, 2018

          Do you personally believe in the mythical Christian God – The Trinity – or Jaweh, the mythical Jewish God?

        • Griff

           /  July 26, 2018

          Except for the minor detail that England has had so many imports that the original language and customs was lost over two thousand years ago.
          The name “England” is derived from the Old English name England, which means “land of the Angles”. The Angles were one of the Germanic tribes that settled in Great Britain during the Early Middle Ages.
          Go read some history instead of far right crap and educate your self .

          • High Flying Duck

             /  July 26, 2018

            I highly recommend this book for a rollicking ride through England’s past –

            https://www.penguin.co.nz/books/an-utterly-impartial-history-of-britain-9780552773966

            There’s a sequel as well, but I haven’t read it.

            • Blazer

               /  July 26, 2018

              and I can thoroughly recommend this..an eye opener,watch a few Bill Stills videos and you will appreciate how the world really works..

          • sorethumb

             /  July 26, 2018

            blockquote>As Migration Watch notes, it has been asserted in print (namely by historian James Walvin) that: “the basic human stock of England has been settled and relatively homogenous since time immemorial”. While “time immemorial” is a bit of a stretch, the British population does appear to have remained relatively homogenous since the island was populated by the Anglo-Saxons (and others) from the 5th to the 7th century. In a paper published in Nature, Leslie et al. (2015) report that there is very little genetic structure (differentiation) within the native British population:

            Consistent with earlier studies of the UK, population structure within the PoBI [People of the British Isles] collection is very limited. The average of the pairwise Fst estimates between each of the 30 sample collection districts is 0.0007, with a maximum of 0.003
            This means that native Britons living in one particular area of the country (e.g., Orkney) are not much more closely related to their immediate neighbours than to Britons living in a completely different area of the country (e.g., North Wales). In fact, the largest pairwise Fst values (roughly the proportion of variance between groups) were for Orkney versus North Wales (Fst = 0.003), and for Orkney versus North Pembrokeshire (Fst = 0.003). By comparison, Fst values for major continental groups (i.e., Europe, Africa, East Asia etc.) are in the range of 5–15% (>100 times greater than the average for areas of Britain).
            View story at Medium.com

            • Griff

               /  July 26, 2018

              It is well known that individuals with so-called liberal or leftist views are overrepresented in American academia. By bringing together data on American academics, the general population and a high-IQ population, the present study investigates how much of this overrepresentation can be explained by intelligence. It finds that intelligence can account for most of the disparity between academics and the general population on the issues of abortion, homosexuality and traditional gender roles.

              Can intelligence explain the overrepresentation of liberals and leftists in American academia?. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/284077265_Can_intelligence_explain_the_overrepresentation_of_liberals_and_leftists_in_American_academia [accessed Jul 26 2018].

              Yip smart peploe lean Liberal.
              Who would of thought.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 26, 2018

              A tad selective there, Griff:
              Furthermore, the paper finds that intelligence may account for less than half of the disparity on liberal versus conservative ideology, and much less than half the disparity on Democrat versus Republican identity.

  2. sorethumb

     /  July 26, 2018

    Journalists are being crushed in South-East Asia

    From beatings in Vietnam to arrests in Myanmar, censorship in Thailand to punitive laws in Malaysia, authoritarian regimes are tightening the muzzles over their people’s mouths.
    The past twelve months have been particularly grim for journalists and bloggers in South-East Asia. From beatings in Vietnam to arrests in Myanmar, censorship in Thailand to punitive laws in Malaysia, authoritarian regimes are tightening the muzzles over their people’s mouths.

    The nastiest campaign against press freedom is taking place in Cambodia ahead of national elections on July 29th. In recent weeks the government ordered websites to register with the country’s information ministry. It says it wants to stop people from spreading “fake news”. Those deemed to have done so may be fined $1,000 and locked up for two years. Both of Cambodia’s most prestigious independent newspapers have been nobbled in recent months. One was hit with a huge tax bill, forcing it to close. The other was bought by a Malaysian investor who had dealings with the government of Hun Sen, who has been prime minister for more than three decades. Dozens of radio frequencies broadcasting independent news programmes have been taken off air. Television is controlled by the government. The influential online outlets that remain, such as Fresh News, now function as mere mouthpieces for the regime. Meanwhile, Cambodia’s Supreme Court has disbanded the opposition party and its leader languishes in prison awaiting trial for treason. Mr Hun Sen cannot lose on polling day, and disgruntled Cambodians cannot publicly complain.

    Vietnam’s government is energetically silencing critics, too. This month lawmakers in the one-party state approved a sweeping cyber-security law that would push social media firms to remove content the government dislikes and to reveal the identities of those who use their platforms to spread dissent. Offline, thugs already follow, threaten and sometimes attack activists critical of the Communist regime. In Thailand tough cyber-security laws curb online activity with the threat of prison sentences. Other rules limit political activity and brutally punish criticism of the royal family. The junta in charge, which seized power in a coup in 2014, has sent the country’s nosier journalists to camps for “re-education”. In Myanmar two reporters working for Reuters (one is pictured above), a big news wire, have been detained since December 2017 over reporting on police documents related to the killing of ten Rohingya men and boys. This month they were charged with obtaining secret state documents under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act. They face up to 14 years in prison if found guilty. Both men plead their innocence. A Burmese policeman, himself now behind bars, says the two were framed.

    Even serene Singapore, which already has ultra-tough defamation laws, is considering further action against “deliberate online falsehoods”.

    https://www.economist.com/open-future/2018/07/25/journalists-are-being-crushed-in-south-east-asia?

    We censor by calling out racism, islamophobia and xenophobia. You can’t argue with that can you?

    • Joe Bloggs

       /  July 26, 2018

      No, YOU censor by calling it “Fake News”

      There’s a whole world of difference between free speech and hate speech. Confronting hate speech is not about controlling the conversation and all about promoting growth, tolerance, and inclusivity.

      • sorethumb

         /  July 26, 2018

        There’s a whole world of difference between free speech and hate speech.
        ………….
        Give me examples from Stephan Molyneaux or Lauren Southern?

    • High Flying Duck

       /  July 26, 2018

      Yep, that Goff’s a keeper…

  3. Gezza

     /  July 26, 2018

    Alan, you sometimes wonder how so many plastic bags end up in the ocean & where they come from. We’ve had quite a bit of rain over the past two weeks & my stream has been running up to 3 or 4 feet higher than normal at times. At lunchtime today I just counted the number of plastic shopping bags hung up on the lower foliage on the stream bank opposite my place, including the blackberry, that came down in the flooded stream & weren’t there previously.

    Over a 150 metre stretch of the far bank alone , there are 14 complete bags. There are also 3 complete bags hooked up on obstructions underwater on the stream bed just below my digs. And there are dozens of remnant shreds of all sizes stuck in the bracken & brambles everywhere.

    A helluva volume of dirty brown rushing water goes down this stream when it rains over several days, (or rains heavily for an hour or so). How the hell so many plastic shopping bags end up coming down this stream is beyond me, but if this is just the proportion of them that have got hooked up on obstructions at the sides or on the bottom I shudder to think of the number in the main flow that don’t get stopped & end up in the sea – which is only about 10 km away – when the stream flows through lots of other built up areas further downstream from my place.

    • Griff

       /  July 26, 2018

      When I lived aboard I used to lose the dogs tennis balls all the time
      No problem go for a walk somewhere not easily accessible except by boat and pick up a few more. Same goes for pegs to hang up the washing. lose a few over board just replace them of the next beach.
      The amount of crap that goes into the ocean even in NZ is incredible
      Most accessible beaches have locals who clean up the rubbish so many are not aware of the constant pollution washing up.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  July 26, 2018

      Must be Wellingtonians, G. Don’t send any up here.