Ardern needs to urgently address declining business confidence

Ex acting Prime Minister Winston Peters tried to make a joke out of concerns raised in Parliament about worsening trends in business confidence on Tuesday – see Bridges versus Peters – a surprise conclusion.

But this is something Jacinda Ardern will have to put some priority on addressing when she returns to Parliament next Monday. This was pre-empted in an interview given yesterday.

Stuff:  Jacinda Ardern faces mounting problem in business confidence on her return

When Ardern returns to Parliament on Monday she is set to walk into a building storm over plummeting business confidence that threatens to shake the economy in real terms.

In an interview with Stuff, ahead of her returnArdern gave assurances that her Government’s agenda did not come at the expense of economic growth.

“I absolutely believe that our agenda will grow the economy, will make sure businesses are in a position to grow and prosper, because I need that economic growth to be able to lift the wellbeing of all New Zealanders.

“These are not two separate agendas – they absolutely work hand-in-hand. I think New Zealanders absolutely see my emphasis on the wellbeing of New Zealanders. Now what I’m hoping they’ll also see is the agenda that’s always existed for us around growing the economy”.

That is just vague waffle. She will need to be far more decisive than that. Strong sounding comments ‘absolutely believe(which means little more than ‘I think’ or “I want to convey’) are already overused by Ardern and pretty much meaningless.

Apart from business confidence trending downwards to levels not seen since the Global Financial crisis economic signs are mixed.

Her comments come at the same time figures showed a slight rise in unemployment – the first since December 2016 – though unemployment remained low. Job creation had slowed, two major construction company had collapsed in recent weeks and more industrial action was in the offing.

But while economic growth had slowed, the overall picture remained positive. Migration was strong, the Government accounts were solid and spending was up. Despite farmers registering low levels of confidence, commodity prices were strong and the dollar was down, benefiting exporters.

Despite that, New Zealand had dropped from near the top of one OECD table on business confidence, to second from bottom, and that threatened to slow investment and growth.

Confidence may bounce back, but if it stays relatively low that will, in time, flow through to economic activity with lower employment and less investment in business development likely.

Ardern:

“What I intend to do is, within a month at least, bring together some of the work we’ve been doing in earnest around working together with the business community, to make sure that we are tackling some of the challenges that we’re facing collectively”.

“But what I’m really proud of is that we know and recognise some of the challenges that businesses are saying to us they have. Finding and attracting skilled labour, making sure that we grow our exports, diversifying our economy beyond housing and dairy – those are challenges we’re tackling head on.”

“We have incredibly low levels of unemployment relative to the OECD in particular. We have good solid growth forecast for the future. We have a surplus and, relative to other countries, our debt’s in pretty good shape too”.

“When you tackle challenges that creates a level of uncertainty. Because you’re creating change. We are modernising our economy, but we need to bring everyone with us.

“Within the month, I’m committed to bringing those strands together and doing a significant speech on the economy and we’re very much focused on addressing some of those concerns I’ve heard. But I feel absolutely confident we’re tackling this head on and we can bring business with us.”

Flowery and exaggerated language aside, that doesn’t say very much that is likely to turn confidence around. I think that people who make decisions in business would like to hear something far more substantive.

And beyond New Zealand there is a lot of international uncertainty as Donald Trump ramps up his trade war with China. That could be mostly bluster, but it could also get very messy, and New Zealand would not be immune from the effects.

Both the domestic and international economies pose major challenges for Ardern. A baby photo won’t cut it.

 

Leave a comment

83 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  August 3, 2018

    ‘When Ardern returns to Parliament on Monday she is set to walk into a building storm over plummeting business confidence that threatens to shake the economy in real terms.’

    What a beat up load of b/s!
    Con men losing confidence…wellI never….

    Any individual, au fait with the factors that influence the NZ economy,knows that domestic business confidence has very little effect in reality.
    International events,interest rates,commodity prices,forex rates are the pertinent factors.

    Reply
    • Business confidence has a direct effect on employment and investment decisions.

      The Government faces a very real problems with difficulties in the building industry, not just to address what they used to refer to as a housing crisis, but also to get anywhere near achieving their promises over Kiwibuild.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  August 3, 2018

        so we accept that we cannot even rely on Treasury projections.

        What sort of crystal ball are these businessmen using?

        Anecdotal evidence on the deficiencies in business confidence are numerous.
        A particularly useful example is the GFC…

        All that talent,all that expertise and business acumen but…’no one saw it coming’Bol.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 3, 2018

          When the Govt appoints the likes of Cullen to produce tax policy and Greens as environment ministers and unionists to make labour policy business doesn’t need a crystal ball.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  August 3, 2018

            yes I’m like you Al,I find it hard to forgive Cullen for running straight line budget surplus’ when he was finance…minister.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              By taxing and spending till the cupboard was bare as he boasted proudly. That’s your man, B.

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              um Al….surplus=plenty….comprenez!

            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 3, 2018

              He lifted Government spending to match and exceed the surplus, then boasted he’d left the cupboard bare for National. Comprendez?

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              I comprenez alright…with the dark clouds of the GFC forming,he had little choice…according to…..

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Cullen supervised a massive transfer of govt debt to the private sector and doubtless will repeat the performance if given the chance.

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              care to expand on this..sounds like a great idea…’Cullen supervised a massive transfer of govt debt to the private sector ‘

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Not hard to get your head around, B. Just increase taxes, costs and regulations and voila.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 3, 2018

              Just as the NZ economy was tanking and prior to the GFC hitting the rest of the world, Cullen did this:

              “The cupboard is almost bare and that is the way Michael Cullen planned the 2008 Budget.

              He has delivered a Budget that offers a little of something for almost everyone but his biggest gift is to National – an election-year headache.

              There is so little cash left to play with, $1.75 billion, that National will have little headroom to make attractive tax promises without saying what funding commitments Labour has made it will scrap. ”

              “That is what Michael Cullen promised and that is what he has delivered. The $1.75 billion isn’t real either because $750 million of it was earmarked for health long ago.

              Phil Goff’s revealing comments this week showed that Labour is into legacy politics and this is a legacy Budget – a legacy to National. It will make it harder for National to win and if it does win, it will make it harder to govern.

              Cullen told journalists before delivering his speech: “I would not want to repeat the famous Robert Muldoon statement that the cupboard is bare – actually Sir Robert had sold the cupboard off and pawned the house at the same time – but I would say that we are in this Budget reducing the fiscal position to one which is quite tight and does not allow for any significant further loosening at all.’

    • Trevors_elbow

       /  August 3, 2018

      Yeah…NAH!!

      no business confidence… no hiring… no capital investment… reined in spending… no investment and tightening of spending very quickly lowers overall economic activity via the multiplier effect…

      It is most certainly is a fact as it goes straight to credit availability calculations.. hence why all the bank economic teams spend so much time surveying confidence levels…

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  August 3, 2018

        are you talking about a self fulfilling prophesy?

        I was criticised for being pessimistic.Are you saying that NZ businessmen are hopeless pessimists!

        Reply
        • Trevors_elbow

           /  August 3, 2018

          Diversion.

          NZ Business people are analyses of risk and makers of judgments when it comes to investing their hard earned capital…

          This Goverment has unsettled them markedly….

          You know this, given all your rants on economics, quite well….

          Aeryn and co are attempting to kneecap NZ Business so quite rightly they are backing off and looking to ride the storm till the next election

          All Grant’s spending dreams will go up in a flash of confidence evaporatingif he and Jacinda dont roll back some of their more aggressive anti business measures

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  August 3, 2018

            ref…’no one saw it ..coming’!

            Reply
            • Trevors_elbow

               /  August 3, 2018

              Your so consumed by hate you would kill the golden goose that supports all the wealth transfer taxes you adore… you’re a total fool and a complete dissembler..

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              you are a wee bit clueless Trevor…you do not seem to understand,money supply ,interest,tax avoidance structures and modern Capitalism at all.

  2. PartisanZ

     /  August 3, 2018

    The crash in business confidence has certainly had a dramatic affect on employment statistics, as we discovered just yesterday …

    If, just for argument’s sake, there was a single individual person capable of beating-up this bullshit to the extent it actually crippled our economy, what would we call them?

    A traitor?

    Or shall we call them …. The National Party?

    The thwarted Blue Children … who can see only Red …

    Reply
    • Trevors_elbow

       /  August 3, 2018

      Confidence numbers are a leading indicator… ya know future intentions… unemployment numbers are mainly historical..

      So Parti.. its Treason to be her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition is it? Its Treason for Economisrs to publish unpalatable facts is it?

      Oh dear your unraveling!!

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  August 3, 2018

        How dare you bring Her Majesty into it!

        What’s happening with so-called ‘business confidence’ is in some part, possibly in considerable part political ideology, skullduggery and treachery that has the potential to do real palpable harm to the economy …

        I suppose if that’s what National folks want … who am I to judge …?

        Reply
    • duperez

       /  August 3, 2018

      I recall someone ‘thwarted’ in an election some years back publicly announcing their hope that things would be really bad in the country. They would not look for ways to improve things or help the elected lot in any way. The petulance was astounding, the mindlessness bewildering. They weren’t interested in the country improving, they were only interested in being in power.

      This person is still a prominent commentator. Every morning now they are likely putting their feet on the floor saying “Things are going to crap, everything is terrible and I’m going to tell as many people as I can so the whole country can copy my morning routine. Brilliant.”

      And at night retire with a sense of achievement after another day of putting termites in the foundations. That’s not treason or being traitorous. That’s just people, that’s just politics.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  August 3, 2018

        Who is this seething mass of vitriol exactly?

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  August 3, 2018

          Just an effing cow whose opinion is still sought. It was a bit like taking your ball home because you couldn’t get your own way. More than that though, it was then exhorting others to wreck the game and deflate their newly acquired ball. NZ in ruins would have suited their agenda perfectly.

          Reply
  3. Gerrit

     /  August 3, 2018

    Most notable area I have seen to date where lack of business confidence is showing up is in the reduced stock levels (and product range) at raw material importers.

    Aluminum suppliers are running down their stock holdings to buffer against lower demand resulting in some plate sizes not in stock or and on a 6 week leadtime.

    One of my customers relayed another instance where they ordered a fairly nominal 4000 sq metres of prepreg carbon fibre from the local importer. Normally the imported would have this in stock. Not anymore as the maintain much reduced inventory and order from the manufacturer as needed with an 8 week leadtime.

    Inventory levels at both local and imported raw material suppliers are being run down at the detriment of local production.

    Who can afford to have money tied up in slow moving inventory?

    Not just seen in raw material suppliers but for tooling as well.

    Would not be surprised to see inventory levels and range reduced in retail as well.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  August 3, 2018

      prudent inventory management is a core business activity.

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  August 3, 2018

        ..based on falling future demand.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  August 3, 2018

          J.I.T.

          Reply
          • Gerrit

             /  August 3, 2018

            Just in Time forecasting and raw material delivery works great for bigger businesses with a steady production and sales stream plus the financial cash flow to stock pile finished goods.

            Smaller ones, that are open to the vagaries of the market, tend to buy raw material as and when needed due to sales.

            Relying on the local importers and wholesalers to carry stock. The smaller business is quite happy to pay a premium for this.

            Lately though the importers and wholesalers have been reducing stock levels and it that trend that is being commented on.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Even repair parts. Been waiting a week for a common dishwasher soap dispenser to arrive on backorder. Would normally have been in stock I’m sure.

    • PartisanZ

       /  August 3, 2018

      The same “falling future demand” could easily have occurred under a National government.

      There are also corporate-capitalist-inspired economic boom-and-bust cycles to consider regardless of who appears to hold the Treasury benches …

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  August 3, 2018

        The fact confidence has fallen so far so fast in relatively benign international conditions is the worry.
        Part of it is the natural anti-Labour bias, but this Government have put out a lot of mixed messages, promoted and backtracked and sprung major policy announcements from no-where.
        Business likes certainty and stability and this has been taken away in a very abrupt manner.
        The Government seems unable to articulate its policy direction and is very ad-hoc.
        If they can get some coherency things may improve, as even if you don’t like what is happening, once you have certainty as to what it is you can plan accordingly.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  August 3, 2018

          Thanks for acknowledging “part of it is natural anti-Labour bias” … I wonder what that proportion actually is, if it could be measured?

          The idea that business likes “certainty and stability” is rather antithetical to the constant propaganda about “risk” and “disruption”, don’t you think?

          Business likes conditions favourable to ‘the profit motive’ and especially control of the labour component of costs … virtually the only remaining cost-component capable of being either contained or reduced – via outsourcing, immigration, contracts and piecework – now that we source the cheapest of every other cost-component from the sweatshop economies of the world via what’s euphemistically called ‘globalization’ …

          The above is a Right-Wing or ‘Blue’ paradigm. That’s what business likes …

          They like National …

          They’re populated by National people … as is Treasury and all but a handful of the Think Tanks and Consultancies who help them dictate government policy …

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  August 3, 2018

            Ah … not to mention Local Government … and their ‘Commercial Arms’ …

            Or perhaps it’s vice-versa … Local Govt Commercial Holding Companies … and their Local Governance Arms … District & Regional Councils?

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  August 3, 2018

            The idea that business likes “certainty and stability” is rather antithetical to the constant propaganda about “risk” and “disruption”, don’t you think?

            I don’t think you really get the concept of business risk. The idea is to be able to identify risks & mitigate or eliminate them when making business decisions – to take calculated risks, not to gamble.

            Reply
          • High Flying Duck

             /  August 3, 2018

            Adding to Gezza’s comment. All business is risky. But policy and macro risks are hard to mitigate against.
            It is tough enough making a success of a business in any commercial and competitive market. To have “wild -cards” thrown in by the Government of the day that change the playing field simply compounds the issues and makes it that much harder.
            Business can handle change, but it should be clearly articulated and plenty of lead time given. Otherwise you get stalled investment and lower employment.
            Business is risky. Trying to operate with a Government that flies by the seat of its pants is simply gambling.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Yes. It’s one thing to manage the risks of competitors, technology, suppliers, customers and staff. It’s another to have the rules of the game changed on you overnight. Politicians and bureaucrats have no idea.

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              your transformation from cheery optimist to doomsayer pessimist was quite…rapid.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 3, 2018

              I’m still an optimist Blazer. That doesn’t preclude being a realist.

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              @HFD…doesn’t preclude being a pessimist on that measure…either.

  4. PartisanZ

     /  August 3, 2018

    Gosh and golly! With business confidence at ‘Rock Bottom’ I don’t know what to make of the front page article in today’s Northern Advocate …

    ‘Region cashes in as Jafas flee city’ – Peter de Graaf

    “The country’s biggest Mitre 10 store is due to open in Waipapa next week with 60 new jobs and … $13 million investment … It’s another sign of surging business confidence in BOI and around the North … hot on the heels of … plans for a $200 million hotel in Whangarei and Seeka’s $18 million investment in fruit packing and coolstores in Kerikeri … ”

    But OMG it gets worse …

    “Mitre 10 … had been waiting until the time was right … for a good moment in time, when the economy was favourable, to re-establish in the area” …

    Ludec [co-owner] said factors which had helped convince him the time was right included government investments in infrastructure such as the long awaited roundabout at SH10-Waipapa Rd intersection …”

    Oh NO!!! “The time is right” not once but TWICE!

    “Big-box retail isn’t the only sector of the BOI economy which is booming. The retirement sector was struggling to keep up with demand … Fast-food franchises are also expanding …”

    How bad can it get!!!???

    “Established businesses are bigger than they were a few years ago. Everyone’s had a lift” – Kerikeri Business Assoc Chair Jason Vokes …

    I knew the sky was falling … I just knew it! We’re DOOOOOOOOOOOMED!

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  August 3, 2018

      … “surging business confidence” …?

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  August 3, 2018

        ” … long awaited roundabout …”

        That’s a Provincial Growth Fund project …

        Oh no!

        But then … I did say it got worse, didn’t I?

        I’ll spell it out … PGF … surging business confidence …

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  August 3, 2018

          What did I say that warrants moderation?

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 3, 2018

          Spotted Shane Jones with pockets full of taxpayer money needing votes? Or just the momentum generated by National’s long overdue focus on a decent highway north? Mostly the latter and Key’s tourism boom I think.

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 3, 2018

          It’s tragic that now this country has to save up to build a roundabout. That is how ridiculous the costs of building anything have become.

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  August 3, 2018

            Let alone a 100.2 km four-lane motorway from Warkworth to Whangarei …

            … for $5 billion!!!

            The PGF Waipapa roundabout is Central government providing a kind of ratepayer welfare to Local government … in this case so that FNDC has $4+ million to spend on diverting roads around the CBD at Kerikeri … which will probably blow-out to $9 million (the cost of the roundabout) by the time its done …

            Let’s hope they can keep a cap on the latest sewage system in Kerikeri huh?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              The $13B annual spend on welfare could have built a lot of infrastructure over the past half century.

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              @Al…the 5-6billion that the big 4 aussie banks suck out of the economy every year could build even….more.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              There are no NZ shareholders, B?

            • Blazer

               /  August 3, 2018

              there are some..but the big holders are U.S.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Kiwisaver? Cullen Fund?

            • PartisanZ

               /  August 3, 2018

              @Alan – “The $13B annual spend on welfare could have built a lot of infrastructure over the past half century.”

              True … including some really cheap concentration-style camps for the poor and all the multitudes of bludgers and shirkers …

  5. NOEL

     /  August 3, 2018

    Is low business confidence impacting on business?

    “Business confidence had fallen in the previous quarter ahead of the general election, and it appears uncertainty over the new government policies have made businesses even more downbeat,” Leung said in a statement. “Business may be worried about the outlook for the New Zealand economy under the new Labour-led government, but for now that is not reflected in demand in their own business.”
    The NZIER survey is a key metric of business sentiment watched by the Reserve Bank and typically tracks closely with the ANZ Business Outlook, which was at an eight-year low last month. Firms have become gloomier since the formation of the Labour-led government, with questions hanging over what impact its policies will have on industrial relations and how effective it will be reconfiguring the property market.
    Leung said previous surveys show business confidence tends to drop when Labour takes office and increase when National is in charge, but that sentiment has a muted impact on actual trading activity.”
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11975888

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  August 3, 2018

      Again we are not talking the relatively minor drop of business confidence that accompanies a Labour govt we are talking GFC type levels of business confidence and that is without the biggest concern for businesses yet to be implemented – 1970s style workplace reform.

      As for this: “Business may be worried about the outlook for the New Zealand economy under the new Labour-led government, but for now that is not reflected in demand in their own business.”

      Reply
      • Zedd

         /  August 3, 2018

        lets all just go into ‘TOTAL PANIC’.. because Natl are in opposition !

        “wotalotaBS” 😀

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  August 3, 2018

          Glad you’re not running the country Zedd, though based on the current mob you’d actually be no worse as they have no idea either.

          Reply
          • Zedd

             /  August 3, 2018

            ‘Glad you’re not running the country Zedd,’
            ditto pantzi

            btw: I have been a member of 2 parties.. but didnt get on their party lists.. so; you have nothing to worry about 😀

            Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  August 3, 2018

          Let’s hope the Government stop sticking their head in the sand and recognise there is an issue to be resolved and do something positive about it instead of announcing another working group or another tax.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  August 3, 2018

            there is no issue.

            Its just politiking …where was business regarding stagnation of productivity for the last 5-6 years.?

            Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 3, 2018

        Exactly the point I made earlier. Own future expectations have followed general expectations into the ditch.

        Labour will respond with b.s. and working groups. SNAFU.

        Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  August 3, 2018

    The main reasons for the reported ‘lack of business confidence’:

    1) most ‘business owners’ are Tories/Natl voters

    2) most are pissed.. because they didnt get the tax-cuts that Natl promised

    3) they are just a pack of ‘SORE LOSERS’ after 9 years of getting everything they wanted

    4) the focus has finally swung to the other section of society.. ‘mind the GAP’ 🙂

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  August 3, 2018

      I’m hanging out for the next round of published polls. Just want to see where things are at with voter confidence – in parties & leaders. One can’t really tell from reading blogs.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 3, 2018

        IMO voters are generally a lagging indicator of problems ahead that only registers once the lemmings are streaming off the cliff.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  August 3, 2018

          That’s as may be but it’s probably a better predictor of whether a current coalition might get another term than business confidence.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  August 3, 2018

            At this stage of the election cycle I rather doubt that. It probably depends more on future economics than current baby talk.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  August 3, 2018

              At this stage of the electoral cycle the same can be said of business confidence surveys Alan. I’m just interested in following the political poll trends, like I’m interested in seeing how businesses actually perform in terms of hiring, firing & profitability. These construction industry crashes I doubt can be blamed on Labour.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Dunno about the construction industry crashes. It’s a boom bust heavily-regulated industry. You’d need a lot of info to prove cause and effect.

            • Gezza

               /  August 3, 2018

              Most the analyses I’ve seen come down to inadequate costing policies with too small margins driven by companies ruthlessly competing for the business of developers who always go for the lowest price, without due diligence into whether those prices are realistic. In a nutshell.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Really? I’ve seen them talk about fixed price and delivery contracts failing via escalating costs and regulatory or resource delays. Such things are always more easily predicted in hindsight.

            • Gezza

               /  August 3, 2018

              Yep, and companies have been inadequately costing and underpricing, given these delays, cost increases & shortages. Basically taking risks they shouldn’t in this environment. Probably you don’t watch much tv.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 3, 2018

              Easy to say afterwards. Need to look at the time and context the estimates were made in. A bit like criticising all the finance company collapses in the GFC. You were right and they were all wrong. But actually you were not in the game doing your best at the time.

            • Gezza

               /  August 3, 2018

              Easy to say afterwards. Need to look at the time and context the estimates were made in.
              Well it’s just easy to see afterwards. I’m not criticising them; just recounting what’s actually happened. There’s been a construction boom that’s not supportable in the current environment. Companies have been signing up to deals they can’t deliver on.

          • Blazer

             /  August 3, 2018

            when a construction boom is on…I would have thought the competition to sign a contractor would ensure very nice …margins.

            Reply
            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 3, 2018

              For the subbies it does. They up their rates as demand increases.
              The main contractor signs up to a price well in advance of the project starting. In a fast moving cost environment like there has been in construction it can – and has – been ruinous for many as the cost inflation outstrip the margins.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  August 3, 2018

      I’m sure your analysis exactly mirrors that of the Govt, Z. Which shows a level of ignorance that just adds to the worries of businesses.

      Reply
  7. NOEL

     /  August 3, 2018

    ” 1970s style workplace reform” Aw gee the duck shooting season finished without major strike action nation wide and the whitebait season is weeks away.

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  August 3, 2018

      The proof will be in the pudding if implemented as described in Labour party policy.

      Reply
  8. Gezza

     /  August 3, 2018

    Now is the time to be polling so that we can find out how the country & Peters did.

    Any later & it’ll get skewed & mixed up with any JacNevmania effect.

    Reply
  9. PartisanZ

     /  August 3, 2018

    So, as it happens, the previous two governments, one Labour, one National, and especially the last, with their economic focus firmly on property speculation as a key economic driver, have unwittingly caused a kind of “regional development” as people now flee Auckland for ‘the provinces’ … bringing much needed population growth, (residual property value excess) investment and consumption, creating more resilient local economies …

    Bloody wonderful how Rights wrong themselves …

    Reply

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