World view – Wednesday

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WorldWatch2

For posting on events, news, opinions and anything of interest from around the world.

24 Comments

  1. MaureenW

     /  August 8, 2018

    Teresa May calls on Boris Johnson to say sorry for burqa remarks.
    Muslims clothes now need to be protected from hurtful speech.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/aug/07/boris-johnsons-burqa-remarks-offensive-foreign-office-minister-alistair-burt

    • Missy

       /  August 8, 2018

      He won’t. She is weakened as PM, and he is currently the favourite to replace her. This is going to be used as a power struggle, and May will come out the loser.

      On the leadership, apparently no leadership challenge can be made until after the Summer recess (Parliament has to be sitting), and it is presumed that is why everyone has waited, but it is expected there will be one before the end of the year, whether before or after the Conference in September it is hard to say. There has allegedly been an increased number of Conservative (and Brexit) supporters joining the Conservative party over the last couple of weeks in anticipation of a leadership challenge.

    • Missy

       /  August 8, 2018

      And here is the confirmation.

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6036229/Boris-Johnson-refuses-apologise-article-calling-burka-ridiculous.html

      whilst what he said was inappropriate considering his position, I have to say I have had worse said about what I wear by Muslim men, the best being that I look like a hooker and shouldn’t be out during the day (I was wearing a knee length skirt with sandals and a modest sleeveless blouse – it is a hot summer after all).

      I think it is a bit rich the Muslim community claiming offence at comments about what they wear when they are incredibly offensive about what western women wear.

      It is rather intimidating when confronted with a number of women in a burka or niqab, you can’t read facial expressions or see anything to indicate any form of emotion. When so much of our sub conscience communication is based in body language and facial expressions the burka and niqab prevents this form of communication, making it very difficult to be able to read a situation and understand any potential threat that may be around. This is a primal thing, and fully subconscious, anyone who understands how the human body works will understand that a lot of how we feel comes from visual clues and it is these that first signal any threat to us that our body reacts to. I am not saying these women are a threat, but the wearing of a full face covering removes any possibility of being fully aware of your surroundings and situation as you are unable to read the facial expressions – this is one of the reasons crash helmets and balaclavas are not allowed to be worn in a bank, the staff can’t fully read if they are in danger or not with the face covered.

      • Missy

         /  August 8, 2018

        Majid Nawaz’s take on the full face covering

        • Gezza

           /  August 8, 2018

          Maajid nails it. Now if he can just bring himself to do the same for the falseness of the Bible & the Quran’s claims Allah spoke to ignorant ancients, we might start getting somewhere – although he’d be needing 24 hour police protection.

          • Missy

             /  August 8, 2018

            He talks a lot about the Quran and the need for Islam to go through an enlightenment like christianity where they live in the spirit of, but not to the letter of, their religious text.

            Considering I do not agree with most of his politics (he is a Lib Dem pro EU lefty), he is one of the best hosts on LBC, he talks a lot of sense and is one of the few on there that actually takes a reasonably balanced view – except in the case of Islamists where he is very much against and not into appeasing the more extreme views of Islam.

            • Gezza

               /  August 8, 2018

              Yes I do understand how intimidating it is. It’s the same when gang members or antifa types pull scarves up to cover their faces. As you say, in an open-faced society it’s a visceral reaction. Strangely enuf where you’d expect to see lots of women wearing them, Tehran, the young women even wear their hijabs set well back, showing their hair & faces & makeup, in some of the newsclips on Aljaz that I’ve seen. Very different in Saudi Arabia – daleks there.

        • Missy

           /  August 8, 2018

          And his take on Boris’s comments.

          Insensitive, offensive, ill advised, ignorant, but not racist.

          Pretty much my take. But then many men (and women) are insensitive, offensive, ill advised, and ignorant in commenting on people’s dress. Boris’s position just makes more so.

      • NOEL

         /  August 8, 2018

        So we’ve gone from banning the burka because of potential terrorism to judging the garment.

        • Gezza

           /  August 8, 2018

          Yep. I hate them. They make Muslims seem creepy.

          • Missy

             /  August 8, 2018

            Not just creepy…. They are intimidating. You don’t actually realise until confronted with a number of women (I presume women) wearing them just how isolating and intimidating it is when you can’t read their facial expressions and see them when trying to communicate.

            To be fair, Boris doesn’t actually support the banning of the burka and said that Denmark got it wrong, he then went on to say how ridiculous it is (which are pretty much the only comments picked up on).

            https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/08/05/denmark-has-got-wrong-yes-burka-oppressive-ridiculous-still/

        • Corky

           /  August 8, 2018

          Bingo, Noel. I find the burka culturally offensive. It gives CBDs a third world look. However, I must admit, in New Zealand, I have only encountered the burka three times over many years.

      • Blazer

         /  August 8, 2018

        I think muslims take a dim view of the overt sexualisation of western dress.
        There are extremes like the very young girls in pageants.

        You have every right to dress like a hooker if you so desire.

        • Missy

           /  August 8, 2018

          It is nothing to do with the overt sexualisation of western dress. Essentially in Islam men are not trusted to be able to control themselves when they see a women who is not fully covered so women have to cover themselves up to stop men from taking advantage. It is victim blaming for sexual assault in the worst possible way.

          A great example today. A Sudanese refugee was convicted of raping a 17 yo and attempting to rape another women, his response? “I did it, why not?”. It is basically a misogynistic culture where men are not held accountable for their actions, but women are. Though to be honest considering many of your misogynistic posts I would not be surprised to learn you think it is okay to attack a woman who wasn’t covered head to toe. I think you have a lot in common with the more extreme elements of Islam.

          • Blazer

             /  August 8, 2018

            I find your insinuations extremely offensive.

  2. Patzcuaro

     /  August 8, 2018

    I mean he is just the POTUS.

  3. Gezza

     /  August 8, 2018

    Saudi Arabia expels Canadian ambassador over criticism of arrests
    Riyadh also recalls its envoy and suspends trade deals after Canada’s foreign ministry denounced jailing of activists.

    Saudi Arabia’s state airline has said it is suspending flights to and from Toronto, the latest in a series of measures announced by the kingdom in its diplomatic dispute with Canada.

    The move on Monday came hours after Riyadh expelled Canada’s ambassador over alleged interference in Saudi domestic affairs after Ottawa’s foreign ministry rebuked Riyadh for jailing human rights activists.

    Canadian Ambassador Dennis Horak was given 24 hours to leave the country, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported. The kingdom also froze new trade and investment with Canada worth billions of dollars and recalled its envoy to the country.

    Saudi state television later reported that the Education Ministry was coming up with an “urgent plan” to move thousands of Saudi scholarship students out of Canadian schools to take classes in other countries.

    The Saudi state airline, Saudia, meanwhile said in a statement on its official Twitter account that it would suspend all flights to Toronto starting next Monday, August 13.

    The announcements came days after Canada called for the immediate release of rights campaigners detained during a recent wave of arrests in Saudi Arabia, including relatives of naturalised Canadian citizens. The ministry of foreign affairs said Canada’s actions were an “affront” that required a “sharp response”. “The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has never accepted any interference in its domestic affairs by – or orders from – any country,” SPA quoted the ministry as saying.

    In her first public response to Saudi Arabia’s actions, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Monday: “Let me be very clear … Canada will always stand up for human rights in Canada and around the world, and women’s rights are human rights.”
    Last week, Canada’s ministry of foreign affairs said in a tweet it was “gravely concerned” about the detention of rights activists in the kingdom, including Samar Badawi.
    ……….

    Saudis are flexing their US-empowered muscles all over the place. Dunno what this will do to the $12 billion arms supply deal with Saudi Canada’s previous government signed up to 4 years ago.
    More …
    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/saudi-arabia-expels-canadian-ambassador-criticism-arrests-180806050810633.html