Cycleways, and more interference from Wellington

What?

I have no idea why traffic lights are being controlled from Wellington. Dunedin mayor Dave Cull, who also heads Local Government New Zealand, has been trying to promote Bringing government back to the people – LGNZ and The New Zealand Initiative start Project Localism.

The increasing number of cycleways and traffic disruption in Dunedin, and a dwindling number of car parks, are not particularly  popular in Dunedin.

The cycleways themselves are not particularly popular either.  From my observations some seem to be rarely used, and others seem to be used only occasionally, although cyclist numbers do seem to have increased a little (from hardly any to bugger all).

Traffic jams being ‘controlled’ from Wellington are also going to be unpopular.

40 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  August 10, 2018

    Can’t wait till Welly goes on strike and the rest of the country stops. The perfect outcome for a Labour govt.

    • Blazer

       /  August 10, 2018

      very negative,pessimistic individual you are Al.
      A mix of schadenfreude and welt-schmerz.

  2. Gezza

     /  August 10, 2018

    Outsourcing traffic light control. Welcome to the free market.

    • Blazer

       /  August 10, 2018

      free market,free trade,free speech…feel ..free…to…guffaw.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  August 10, 2018

      Only a socialist could claim outsourcing to a govt bureaucracy is a free market.

      • Gezza

         /  August 10, 2018

        Well if the decision was made on cost, why not?

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 10, 2018

          Because the customers have no alternative.

          • Gezza

             /  August 10, 2018

            They can walk?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              Only until this Govt realises we should have to get a licence for that. Coming soon from your friendly health and safety conscious Lefty Govt.

            • Pete, delete the above before the Government sees it and thinks that it would be a great idea.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              Oi! What happened to free speech!!
              Don wouldn’t be impressed ! 😡

  3. David

     /  August 10, 2018

    Try living in Christchurch, 250 million on cycleways with no cyclists on them and gridlocked traffic. No one bother with the CBD and they are wondering why.

  4. sorethumb

     /  August 10, 2018

    • sorethumb

       /  August 10, 2018

      not sure what that’s got to do with cycling in Dunedin?

      • Gezza

         /  August 10, 2018

        Nothing – but it’s interesting. He’s explaining how people who feel marginalised are able to be manipulated by someone like Hitler who works out how to target their messages at them & embody their desire for order and revenge. And how few people are actually courageous enuf to speak out against them. What’s interesting is that this is how both sides see each other in the US and here.

  5. sorethumb

     /  August 10, 2018


    Commuters pedal down Manchester Street on their way to work in 1954. In the early 20th century Christchurch, with its wide flat streets, was nicknamed ‘Cyclopolis’ because so many people in the city rode bikes.

    • sorethumb

       /  August 10, 2018

      White supremacists on bikes?

      • Gezza

         /  August 10, 2018

        Just old time pakeha Kiwis. Mostly thought of themselves as British & had no idea of Maori history I expect.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 10, 2018

          No, they knew Te Rauparaha had cleaned out the South Island for them and his mates had done the same for the Chathams.

          • Gezza

             /  August 10, 2018

            Unlkely. They were just Brits. Jesus when I was old enuf to go to the New Plymouth museum in the 1960s I was British too. I really enjoyed looking at the exhibits of the implements and weapons and bone carvings of the savage Maori who had luckily now been civilised by dashing colonial heroes – people like Von Tempsky in the action-style paintings showing romanticised battles in the forest. They were now just ancient history. Their stories were over. But they weren’t, as I learnt. And then I began to learn the whole story, and the unfairness to those who had been peaceful.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              Rubbish. I was there and knew what they knew. They weren’t Brits. My wife was 5 generations Kiwi. They were taught in schools that had been there 100 years. You haven’t a clue.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              And you can’t speak for everybody outside of your circle in the South Island either so up your nose.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              I’m not speaking for anyone who didn’t grow up in Chch. Unlike you I stick to what I know something about.

            • sorethumb

               /  August 10, 2018

              My great grandfather had been around and around on sailing ships.My grandfather had been as far north as Wellington and as south as Stewart Island. Everything I knew about the colonists was referred to as “in the olden days”. I think that is how we viewed Britain?

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              The Dominion of New Zealand was the historical successor to the Colony of New Zealand. It was a constitutional monarchy with a high level of self-government within the British Empire.

              New Zealand became a separate British Crown colony in 1841 and received responsible government with the Constitution Act in 1852. New Zealand chose not to take part in Australian Federation and became the Dominion of New Zealand on 26 September 1907, Dominion Day, by proclamation of King Edward VII. Dominion status was a public mark of the political independence that had evolved over half a century through responsible government.

              Just under one million people lived in New Zealand in 1907 and cities such as Auckland and Wellington were growing rapidly. The Dominion of New Zealand allowed the British Government to shape its foreign policy and it followed Britain into the First World War. The 1923 and 1926 Imperial Conferences decided that New Zealand should be allowed to negotiate its own political treaties, and the first commercial treaty was ratified in 1928 with Japan. When the Second World War broke out in 1939 the New Zealand Government made its own decision to enter the war.

              In the post-war period, the term Dominion has fallen into disuse. Full independence was granted with the Statute of Westminster in 1931 and adopted by the New Zealand Parliament in 1947. However, the 1907 royal proclamation of Dominion status has never been revoked and remains in force today.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion_of_New_Zealand

          • Gezza

             /  August 10, 2018

            RNZAF aircraft markings. Spot the difference Al

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              Some had been to war and some just played at it.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              Exactly. And the ones that went to war had British roundels. “Where Britain stands, we stand” and all that.

              And later they had New Zealandish roundels. Because where Britain stands we don’t always stand any more.

              We were kiwi brits in our outlook. No 8 wire ex-colonials, still fiercely loyal to Britain – but switching to America by the end of it. Our whole concept of history back then was of our British forefathers civilising the natives, not of learning about their culture.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              There was no switching to America other than in trade forced by Britain getting absorbed into Europe but Japan was probably more significant. Maori culture was virtually non-existent there then as has been illustrated.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              Defence-wise we recognised Britain wouldn’t be able to do anything useful to defend us any more by the end of the war. Hence ANZUS. I think probably after WWII is when we began to see ourselves most as a truly independent country. We’d sacrificed enuf of our men to Churchill’s fading dreams of empire in the first and second world wars. It’s also when more folk (like my old man) began to talk of the cameraderie with 28th Maori battalion because he’d fought with them.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              It’s funny Al, but it’s only this week I recall that the first Maori words I ever heard spoken were: “Tena Koe. “Tena Koe”, and “Haere Mai, Haere Mai” and they were from my grandpop, when I was a little fella, whenever we visited him. It never struck me as odd, it was just what pop always said.

              He was the sole police sergeant for decades in a small town in Taranaki until he retired from the force and moved to New Plymouth. And he was among the armed constabulary sent to arrest Rua when he had just finished his training in Wellington. He always blamed the Police Commissioner for what went wrong there but he died before I was old enuf to ask him more about it.

              He had a lot more contact with Maori than I realised.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 10, 2018

              Aligned with the Brits in Singapore and Malaya. Not so much with the Yanks in Korea and Vietnam.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              Yes, true but I think that was more against the perceived regional threat of communism in countries important main trading routes. We walked a delicate tightrope with the US in Vietnam. I didn’t realise how much Holyoake had resisted US pressure. Korea we were just part of a UN operation.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              *important to

            • Pink David

               /  August 10, 2018

              “Korea we were just part of a UN operation.”

              The commanders of that UN operation were, in order;

              Douglas MacArthur
              Matthew Ridgway
              Mark W. Clark
              John E. Hull

              If you think it was a ‘UN’ operation, you are kidding yourself.

            • Gezza

               /  August 10, 2018

              We have always pretended it was a UN operation.
              … … …
              “New Zealand military forces were involved in Korea from 1950 to 1957. First, they took part in the United Nations ‘police action’ to repel Communist North Korea’s invasion of its southern neighbour. Better known as the Korean War, this conflict lasted from 25 June 1950 to 27 July 1953, when an armistice was agreed. A reduced New Zealand force then remained in Korea in a garrison role until the last troops were finally withdrawn in 1957.

              The events in North Korea provided an opportunity for New Zealand to pursue its goal of obtaining a commitment by the United States to its security. The ANZUS Treaty of 1951 was the successful achievement of this objective, and was to have far-reaching implications for New Zealand’s international relations in the long term.

              The crisis also had a dramatic influence on New Zealand’s economy. A wool boom brought great prosperity but also provided a backdrop to the bitter waterfront dispute of 1951.
              … … … …
              NZers in Korea (1950-1957)
              4700 New Zealanders served as part of the New Zealand contingent – Kayforce – under UN Command
              1300 served on the frigates during the war and for a period after the Armistice (1953-1957)
              45 men lost their lives serving in NZ forces – 33 of them during the war.
              Although New Zealand’s contribution to the United Nations force was not large, the crisis had a major impact on the country’s approach to international relations. In New Zealand, as elsewhere, it was assumed that North Korea was acting at the instigation of the Soviet Union, and that firm resistance to communist encroachment was necessary.”
              … … …
              https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/korean-war

    • David

       /  August 10, 2018

      I think that was probably because you needed a government licence to buy a car, perhaps if they bring that back in the cycleways will fill up again.
      Cycle helmets are a problem get rid of them and you will probably get more bikers, biking to work is the preserve of the lycra clad and too hard for a lady to drag in all her clothes and make up and hairspray and god knows what else. No one wants to sit anywhere near the bloke who has biked in either.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 10, 2018

        Well you would have had to sit out in the playground because pretty much everyone in my school had biked there. It was nothing for kids to bike across town then. Thousands did it every day. No helmets and I never heard of anyone getting seriously hurt doing it. A few grazed knees and elbows.

  6. Wekalegs

     /  August 11, 2018

    I live in Dunedin and I can confirm use of the bike lanes has INCREASED OVER 100% !! They both use it now.