Results of Māori Electoral Option

there have been small movements of voters from the Māori Roll to General Roll and vice versa, and small increases in the total number enrolled on the Māori Roll , with 52% of Māori on the Māori Roll.

Electoral Commission:

The 2018 Māori Electoral Option ran from 3 April to 2 August and gave all enrolled voters of Māori descent the opportunity to choose whether they wanted to be on the Māori roll or general roll for the next two general elections.

Changes to electoral roll type

  • Māori Roll to General Roll: 10,163
  • General Roll to Māori Roll: 7,956

New enrolments of Māori descent

  • General Roll: 1,808
  • Māori Roll: 3,407

Impact on rolls

  • Net Impact on Māori Roll: +1,200
  • Net Impact on General Roll: +4,015

Total rolls at end of option

  • Māori on Māori Roll: 247,494 (52%)
  • Māori on General Roll: 224,755 (48%)

So that’s fairly evenly split.

I don’t see a big deal with the Māori seats remaining.

Leave a comment

14 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  August 13, 2018

    I suspect the identification of Maori is inconsistent across the two rolls.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  August 13, 2018

      As a New Zealand Māori, or a descendant of a New Zealand Māori, you have the choice of enrolling on the Māori electoral roll or the General electoral roll.

      If you’re on the General electoral roll, you will vote for an MP in a General electorate at the next General Election. If you’re on the Māori electoral roll, you will vote for an MP in a Māori electorate at the next General Election.

      The type of electoral roll you are on makes no difference to who you can vote for with your Party Vote. Every voter, regardless of which electoral roll they are on or where they live in the country, has the same list of political parties to choose from when using their Party Vote.

      That’s pretty much all the qualification needed – your say so, I think. But I don’t think it would be possible or even desirable to have some kind of blood quantum criterion, someone who looks Maori doesn’t get much say in how other people classify them, and listing whanau and checking whakapapa would be too time and resource intensive.

      The only problem I can see is if huge numbers of white supremacists lied to get on the roll, then party voted for asshole parties that want to get rid of the Maori seats. Most of them would rather die, I imagine (or they’d say they would).

      Reply
  2. Corky

     /  August 13, 2018

    The standout stat for me.

    New enrollments of Māori descent:

    General Roll: 1,808
    Māori Roll: 3,407

    That tells me a newer generation are buying this bs about kaupapa Maori.That a real Maori votes Maori. Biased advertising on TV probably appealed a younger generation, and helped
    them subliminally make a Maori Roll choice…if they care in the first place that is.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  August 13, 2018

      It might just mean that those with some Maori ancestry are much more likely to declare themselves Maori if they want to go on the Maori roll than if they want to go on the General roll.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  August 13, 2018

      I think it’s a good sign. I suspect a newer generation are taking pride in their Maoriness and hopefully they’ll include many young, educated, up & comers who will stand tall and make a solid successful future for themselves and their people.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 13, 2018

        Just cross out the last three words and I’m with you.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  August 13, 2018

          They’re the people who will make a difference to how some things like business enterprises and investments and education are done in future Al. Maori tikanga and kaupapa are not fixed in the stone age.

          Reply
  3. Griff.

     /  August 13, 2018

    As Alan says many who have Maori blood are not interested as identifying as Maori .
    I have known a few who would never think to tick Maori instead consider they are NZ’s only.

    ‘Time to end the undemocratic Maori seats.
    Drop the threshold so if there is enough support for a Maori issues party it could still gain representation as the original electoral commission into MMP declared.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  August 13, 2018

      Are you Maori?

      Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  August 14, 2018

      Getting politicians (political elites) to drop the threshold might be more difficult than getting (those who identify as) Maori to give up their Maori Seats?

      I suspect so …

      Reply

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