Ardern showed her mettle, Bridges ineffective

Simon Bridges tried to attack Jacinda Ardern over the teacher strikes in Question Time in Parliament yesterday, but waas largely ineffective as Ardern showed her mettle and not only frustrated Bridges attacks, but returned fire adeptly.

There was a side show during the questioning, with Bridges being required to withdraw and apologise after a remark “I was anticipating an answer from the ventriloquist” that referred to Grant Robertson’s habit of helping fellow ministers with answers.

Leader of the House Chris Hipkins was also ordered to withdraw and apologise a second time after first saying “I apologise for calling the Leader of the Opposition a chauvinistic pig”.

NZ Herald: Simon Bridges called ‘chauvinistic pig’ during Question Time by Education Minister Chris Hipkins

National leader Simon Bridges was accused of being a “chauvinistic pig” in today’s Question Time for a quip he made during questions to Prime Minister Ardern.

The accusation was not from Ardern herself but from another bloke, Education Minister Chris Hipkins, who took umbrage when Bridges suggested that muttering by Grant Robertson was supplying Ardern with the answers.

Bridges referred to Robertson as “the ventriloquist,” a reference to the frequency with which Robertson actually does answer other people’s questions under his breath.

It was an odd  comment from Hipkins, I don’t see anything chauvinistic in what Bridges said. Gerry Brownlee put his own spin on it” I think what the Leader of the Opposition was doing was suggesting to Grant Robertson that this is not instruction time.”

But Ardern had the last word:

The Minister of Finance, for those who are interested in what he muttered, said, “We didn’t.” I’m going to expand substantially on that answer…

Which she did. going on to detail the Government’s priorities in education.

2. Hon SIMON BRIDGES (Leader—National) to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all of her Government’s statements and actions?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN (Prime Minister): Yes.

Hon Simon Bridges: Is she aware that, under her Government, 60,000 people have been on strike in just 10 months, compared to 30,000 in the previous nine years?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: I absolutely acknowledge that because that Government couldn’t resolve the nurses pay dispute, we did have a situation we needed to resolve. And it took this Government doubling that offer that that party last made in office, acknowledging the legitimate safety concerns that nurses had, the understaffing and under-resourcing, and that is how we got to a successful resolution after nine long years of neglect.

Hon Simon Bridges: With teachers contemplating two-day strikes, does she intend to spend the next two years avoiding any responsibility and not actually fixing the problem? [Interruption]

Mr SPEAKER: Order! Order! Settle down please.

Hon Paula Bennett: A good question—a bloody good question.

Mr SPEAKER: Paula Bennett—that’s a warning. I call the right honourable Prime Minister.

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: I have to say I find that line of questioning a bit rich given that the first offer made by this Government is double what that last Government allowed teachers to work under. Double—because we acknowledge that we’ve been left and teachers have been left carrying a neglect of nine years’ under-resourcing of teacher-aides and support. We’ve rectified some of that in the last Budget. We scrapped national standards. We doubled some of the funding that they receive on an operational level. We acknowledge the issues that teachers striked and marched on today. We are working with them to fix the problems we inherited.

Hon Simon Bridges: Then why did her Government prioritise $2.8 billion for a fees-free tertiary policy that isn’t delivering any extra students over additional funding for teachers’ pay and the other issues she mentioned?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: First of all, that is not correct. Second of all, one of the issues that we have is barriers to learning. One of the first people I met after that announcement was made was someone who was entering into tertiary education to be a primary school teacher off the back of our announcement. We have a shortage of teachers. We have barriers to learning because of cost. We’re addressing both of those issues.

Rt Hon Winston Peters: Just to get this patently clear, what term or years of recent politics were the teachers today on the forecourt of Parliament specifically saying they are protesting against?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: The last nine years.

Hon Simon Bridges: I ask again: why did her Government prioritise $2.8 billion for a fees-free tertiary policy that isn’t delivering any extra students over additional funding for teachers’ pay? [Interruption]

Mr SPEAKER: Order! Order! The Prime Minister will sit down. I saw what I’m taking to be a response—am I right?

Hon Simon Bridges: From me?

Mr SPEAKER: Was the member responding to a similar—Well, I’m hearing some people saying yes and some people saying no.

Hon Gerry Brownlee: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker.

Mr SPEAKER: The Hon Gerry Brownlee will, I’m sure, help me.

Hon Gerry Brownlee: Thank you. I think what the Leader of the Opposition was doing was suggesting to Grant Robertson that this is not instruction time.

Mr SPEAKER: Can I ask—first of all I’m going to ask the Hon Grant Robertson: did he do a finger-pointing exercise?

Hon Members: No.

Hon Simon Bridges: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker.

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker.

Mr SPEAKER: I’ll hear Simon Bridges.

Hon Simon Bridges: I was anticipating an answer from the ventriloquist.

Mr SPEAKER: Right, that member will now stand, withdraw, and apologise.

Hon Simon Bridges: I withdraw and apologise.

Hon Chris Hipkins: c

Mr SPEAKER: Order! Mr Hipkins. Mr Hipkins will now stand, withdraw, and apologise.

Hon Chris Hipkins: I apologise for calling the Leader of the Opposition a chauvinistic pig.

Mr SPEAKER: As a result of that non-withdrawal, the Opposition will have an extra five questions. That withdrawal will now be made in accordance with the Standing Orders.

Hon Chris Hipkins: I withdraw and apologise.

Mr SPEAKER: Right, we go back, and I am going to ask Simon Bridges to ask his question again, because I can’t remember what it was.

Hon Simon Bridges: Then why did her Government prioritise $2.8 billion for a fees-free tertiary policy that hasn’t delivered a single extra student over additional funding for teachers’ pay?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: The Minister of Finance, for those who are interested in what he muttered, said, “We didn’t.” I’m going to expand substantially on that answer, because in the last Budget we prioritised funding for 1,500 more teachers. We gave a 45 percent increase for operational funding. We provided the first core early childhood education funding increase in nearly a decade. We tripled learning support funding to $272 million. That is called prioritising education. It’s called prioritising children. If that side of the House thinks that everything that was brought to Parliament’s forecourt today was all about us, then where were they on the steps of Parliament?

Rt Hon Winston Peters: Does the fees-free tertiary policy uptake show some positive recent trends, and if so, could she leak that information to the House?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: Yes, indeed it does. We have seen an increase in uptake, and one of the issues we have is we inherited a declining enrolment across our tertiary education providers, which we are turning around.

Hon Simon Bridges: Why on Monday did her Government prioritise hundreds of millions of dollars more funding for new trees than it has for the entire primary school teacher wage settlement?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: As I say, that pay settlement happened to be double what that Government invested in the sector. But I’d also say that that announcement wasn’t just about the 1,000, possibly 2,000, jobs that it would create; it was also about the environment and it was about erosion. According to some of the ads the National Party has put out—I’m told the Leader of the Opposition cares about the environment; I’m yet to see any proof of it.

Hon Simon Bridges: That’s allowed is it?

Mr SPEAKER: Yes, it is allowed in response to the type of questions that the Leader of the Opposition’s been asking.

Hon Simon Bridges: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. What was anything other than straight about the question I asked?

Mr SPEAKER: I suggest that if the member wants an answer to that, he looks at the tapes.

Hon Simon Bridges: Why on Monday did her Government prioritise hundreds of millions of dollars more for trees than for the primary school teachers’ settlement, when they’re protesting outside today?

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: As I pointed out, that initial offer—because we are in the middle of a negotiation—was still double what that last Government put into teachers’ salaries. It’s not the only issue that we of course are discussing with them; we’re discussing their workload, non-contact time, professional development—all issues that weren’t prioritised by the last Government.

Hon Simon Bridges: Does she agree with Labour leader Jacinda Ardern, who said, “We will not” have national strikes under a Government she leads.

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: That was in a direct question around fair pay agreements and I stand by it.

73 Comments

  1. robertguyton

     /  August 16, 2018

    Jacinda’s managing the infant with ease.

    • PDB

       /  August 16, 2018

      Don’t bring Gayford into the discussion Robert – I expected better from you.

  2. Gezza

     /  August 16, 2018

    I watched this Question & Jacinda’s replies late last night & came to the same conclusion – that Ardern showed she was in control & very capably demolished Bridges’ attempts to score points off some rather pointless supplementaries that don’t actually amount to any really valid criticism of the government’s spending priorities – and actually reflect more badly on National’s in Education.

    I noted, however, that Simon finally got thru her defences & landed a good punch right at the very end !

    • Gezza

       /  August 16, 2018

      PS: From the comments he made in a sound bite on 1ewes last night, Hipkins sounded very disappointed and annoyed with the teachers at their protest outside Parliament that day, as though they were an ungrateful lot, and wondered if his testy attitude in this exchange showed that, while Ardern can hack it, he was feeling the pressure !

    • Pickled Possum

       /  August 16, 2018

      Simon PUNCHED Jacinda??????

      • Corky

         /  August 16, 2018

        Metaphorically speaking..yes. Haven’y you seen the latest domestic violence stats.?Parliament is the most dysfunctional whanau in the land.

      • robertguyton

         /  August 16, 2018

        Simon wheeled-out a dusty half-truth and presented it as something fresh, just to appear to be not-entirely a loser. Jacinda has countered the charge many times before, but Bridges is desperate and Bennett needs something to support-crow about.

        • Gezza

           /  August 16, 2018

          Yes she is rather amusing the way she always shakes her head and tch tch’s.

          Although Jacinda may have countered that charge many times, I haven’t actually seen her do it & politically it’s a good strategy to bring it up often, hoping the tv media will pick it up in one of their 3 second sound bites as often as possible when strike action’s happening or threatened.

          The rest of his supplementaries were largely worthless & well-countered, imo. Bubba is not impeding Jacinda’s performance one iota so far.

          • PDB

             /  August 16, 2018

            So Ardern’s defense is that strikes wouldn’t happen under her watch in regards to one very specific policy but national strikes are all good to go for any other policy they wheel out or expectation they have raised through over-promising & wasting taxpayer money in other areas?

            Hardly a vote/PR winner for Ardern I would’ve thought.

            • robertguyton

               /  August 16, 2018

              It’s not her defence, it’s simply the fact of the matter. She will swat away Bridges’ blowfly-buzzing every time but he seems unable to think on his feet and take a new tack.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              Considering the new workplace laws are yet to be implemented so we are yet to see what strikes may occur regarding that she must be ecstatic that her other policies have already produced major strike action. Looks promising.

  3. Ray

     /  August 16, 2018

    Had to laugh at the Labour MPs going down to join the teacher march in solidarity yesterday.
    They still haven’t got their head round the fact THEY are the Government, the people the teachers are marching against.

    • Blazer

       /  August 16, 2018

      any National M.P’s …bother?

      • robertguyton

         /  August 16, 2018

        Too ashamed by their 9 looooong years of starving education, something Jacinda reminded them of with every answer in the House. Why Bridges persevered with his questions, no one can say…
        This Government is attending to that starvation and while such negotiations are never easy (there are pro-National teachers, heaven help the children!), progress is steady; think, the nurses strike. It doesn’t surprise me at at that Labour ministers met with teachers; they sincerely mean to improve their lot. Likewise, it’s no surprise National Party/Opposition ministers were nowhere to be seen.

        • Gezza

           /  August 16, 2018

          Why Bridges persevered with his questions, no one can say

          When she doesn’t answer them directly he can’t let it go. It’s possibly his Courtroom experience. Thinks he’s still prosecuting? I suspect he thinks he’s winning in these exchanges but from the viewpoint of someone non-aligned like me – he’s getting nowhere. Some of his team are doing better.

        • PDB

           /  August 16, 2018

          Guyton: “progress is steady”

          No doubt progress would be great if billions of $ of taxpayer money wasn’t wasted on fighting the Chinese in the Pacific, a provincial slush fund of no accountability and good looking horses – not to mention paying the electricity bills of millionaires to heat their homes over winter.

          Ironically National if in power now would have had plenty of money to address any payment disputes and all teachers would have already benefited financially from lower taxes.

          • Blazer

             /  August 16, 2018

            National woulda,shoulda,coulda,…9 years of indifference and pandering to the..rich.Hopeless.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              National left the new govt lots of money (and low debt by current International standards) in order to pay teachers and the like more Blazer – you can hardly complain that the govt instead decided to spend all their money on bribing students, Winston and families that were already well subsidised then.

          • Blazer

             /  August 16, 2018

            National left the new govt lots of money (and low debt by current International standards) -‘pull the other leg…it plays…a quintet by ..Schubert.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 16, 2018

              A burgeoning surplus and debt levels that all economists are falling over themselves to say can be significantly increased not good enough for you Blazer?
              Enough in the kitty to pay for free university education, trees by the million, provincial lolly scrambles, pacific island boondoggles & more?
              If they hadn’t left a gigantic hole in their budget this would not be an issue.

            • Blazer

               /  August 16, 2018

              @HFD…you forgot all the tens of billions Nat borrowed ….a 6th form student could have done what they did…

              what a disgraceful way to get a…knighthood.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  August 16, 2018

              And yet they were lauded world wide and no other country managed to be as successful during the GFC.
              I guess the rest of the world is populated by 4th formers.

            • Blazer

               /  August 16, 2018

              ‘lauded’ worldwide for being patsies to Corporations.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              HFD: “And yet they were lauded world wide and no other country managed to be as successful during the GFC.”

              Not to mention the odd major earthquake or two….quite an economic feat. May need to be replicated when they come back in to fix up the mess this current mob are making.

            • Blazer

               /  August 16, 2018

              ‘no other country managed to be as successful during the GFC.”

              patent nonsense,and I suspect you both know it.How do you measure this ‘success’?

          • robertguyton

             /  August 16, 2018

            Blazer sums the counter to your nonsense up beautifully, PDB. You ought to be grateful to him.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              Like you he makes statements that run counter to fact – no wonder you like him. Winston has billions to spend at will, if he cared about teachers maybe he could free up the few hundred million $ required? If not, why not?

            • robertguyton

               /  August 16, 2018

              “Winston has billions to spend ”
              Oh, that must hurt, PDB! Winston; at the helm, flush with cash and grinning like a Cheshire Cat! If only Key and English hadn’t tried to ruin him; Winston would be your pal and you’d be sharing his joy!

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              Best you continue to avoid answering the real questions Robert – like why is Winston (a minor party leader within the govt) “grinning like a Cheshire Cat” whilst being “flush with cash” whilst teachers go on strike?

            • robertguyton

               /  August 16, 2018

              “Why is Winston…?”
              Let it go, PDB; you’ll never understand Winston. Just go with his flow.

      • Corky

         /  August 16, 2018

        And be associated with losers, Blazer? National has an election to win. You don’t associate with people who will eventually cost you votes.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  August 16, 2018

    So Labour is facing a season of public sector strikes to be satisfied with money they haven”t budgeted for. To be followed by private sector strikes as soon as they can pass legislation to empower those unions.

    • robertguyton

       /  August 16, 2018

      The Government always has the riposte, “We’re mopping up after 9 looooong years of National’s sloppiness and neglect’ and they have that right; the negotiations are difficult, but all those affected know that National caused the problems, starved the workers and institutions of needed funds and smudged the facts in order to get away with it; those people aren’t blaming the present Government for the problem. They are pressing them to solve the issues and that’ll take some doing, but sheeting the resentment home to National where it belongs is a much easier task, especially for Jacinda, who’s great at delivering a pithy message.

      • PDB

         /  August 16, 2018

        Unlike you Robert I think voters overall ain’t that gullible – they have seen this govt pouring billions into NZL First’s pocket & elsewhere and know that the money was always there (made under the National-led govt) to settle public service pay issues. This govt chose not to and are paying the consequences. Which leads us to the huge tax increases they will need to foist on to workers through their tax group as the economy tanks and their spending increases.

        • robertguyton

           /  August 16, 2018

          The voters, PDB?
          You mean those people who put National out and the Lab/NZ1?Green coalition in?
          Those voters?

          • PDB

             /  August 16, 2018

            Alternative facts there Robert – you’ll find that National/NZL First voters combined had more votes (even excluding ACT) than the current mob of three so if ‘voters’ were what mattered that would have been the outcome post-election. Of course what mattered instead was who would sell out to Winston.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 16, 2018

        Who are overpaid relative to teachers and all the other public sector employees likely to strike, Robert? Because unless you can find someone all that will happen is that the NZ$ will devalue via inflation and no-one will be any better off at the end of all this.

  5. Pickled Possum

     /  August 16, 2018

    Jacinda could possibly be the best thing that has happened to NZ Politics. A person who actually cares and can articulate it within the legal parameters, she does that very well.

    She has the debating skills of a well-seasoned politician and leaves Bridges floundering like a landlocked Sole. The only thing that will slow her down is not enuff comfort food and sleep.

    Bridges little off-sider Paula Bennett looks like a puppet. The eye rolls, the #see look at that Mr Speaker, face gestations, she is making it too easy for Judy to just roll on in there.
    Not into body shaming butt What the Hell happened to Paula?? shes grey and got bags and she looks skinny!! Is she not well??? Cause she doesn’t look it?

    Bridges was a police prosecutor and will have the DNA of “everybody is a liar”
    it may work in the Jester Courts of NZ butt Simon this is the real world where grown-ups are trying to make a difference to joe and jane tumeke lives.
    Looks like the Greens are turning out to be a force to be reckoned with.
    Winston should give them his bus. ‘The force of the North’

    • Gezza

       /  August 16, 2018

      Nice one, sista! 👌🏽 😎 ☘

      • Gezza

         /  August 16, 2018

        😡

        Righto. Let’s have no more downticking of my comments today or I’ll be asking PG to appoint a senior investigator with IT expertise to find out who’s doing it ! 😠

    • PDB

       /  August 16, 2018

      She couldn’t ask the simple question of why they spent billions on first year students instead of paying teachers and the like more. She was asked again why more money for Winston’s trees project was obviously more important than paying teachers more – again no answer. She could be asked why more Diplomats, the Pacific Islands, the racing industry etc got funded before teachers and nurses etc and again she wouldn’t be able to answer.

      If you think that is somehow ‘winning’ I’m afraid you’re wrong. She can’t answer such questions because the real answer is that Labour totally sold out to Winston in order to gain power or in the case of first year students their future vote was more important for them to secure. The survival of her party is obviously all she really ‘cares’ about.

      • robertguyton

         /  August 16, 2018

        “She couldn’t ask the simple question …”
        Because her job is to …answer??

      • robertguyton

         /  August 16, 2018

        And when Jacinda does ask a question, it’s “What was National doing during those 9 looooong years???”

      • Gezza

         /  August 16, 2018

        She couldn’t ask the simple question of why they spent billions on first year students instead of paying teachers and the like more.

        Yes she did. Ably assisted by some cunning old codger ….

        Rt Hon Winston Peters: Does the fees-free tertiary policy uptake show some positive recent trends, and if so, could she leak that information to the House?

        Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: Yes, indeed it does. We have seen an increase in uptake, and one of the issues we have is we inherited a declining enrolment across our tertiary education providers, which we are turning around.

        Hon Simon Bridges: Why on Monday did her Government prioritise hundreds of millions of dollars more funding for new trees than it has for the entire primary school teacher wage settlement?

        Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN: As I say, that pay settlement happened to be double what that Government invested in the sector. But I’d also say that that announcement wasn’t just about the 1,000, possibly 2,000, jobs that it would create; it was also about the environment and it was about erosion. According to some of the ads the National Party has put out—I’m told the Leader of the Opposition cares about the environment; I’m yet to see any proof of it.

        That, mon ami, est an answer.

        You are too aligned to be objective about such matters.

        • PDB

           /  August 16, 2018

          You are easily fooled if that is an ‘answer’, read it again – she defended the actual policies implemented not why those policies are more important than pay increases to teachers and the like. 50 million trees are being planted already in NZL each year, there is no reason for that policy being a higher priority than giving teachers a pay-rise, especially considering the unions are Labour’s support base – her answer is disingenuous. Likewise a very tiny uptake in first year student enrollments is hardly an explanation as to why that was prioritised over paying teachers more. Considering the investment made that tiny increase looks like bad money spent.

          For example saying you think its good for relationship-building to pay for more diplomats is not answering why spending on diplomats is more important than giving teachers a decent pay-rise. Government is all about prioritising as there is never enough money to do everything.

          The line of questioning from Bridges was obviously why have you spent billions elsewhere and left nurses. teachers and the like at the back of the gravy-train if you really ‘care’ about them?

          • Gezza

             /  August 16, 2018

            It IS an answer dumkopf! It’s a pretty typical Political answer to a Question.

            The entire issue is being laid at the door of the Nats who are being told all the time that there are so many spending priorities – because of National’s continued intransigence about pay levels &/or chronic underfunding of various areas including public education – that they can’t all be satisfied in the first budget.

            They are also in a working coalition & confidence agreement with more than just a couple of pushover parties like the last lot, so they have to allocate spending to their policies or priorities as well.

            You might not LIKE the answers she’s giving, but they’re as good or better than some of the smarmy nonsense the previous government trotted out in the more mealy-mouthed of their answers to some Questions.

            The jury’s still out on how well or otherwise this is all going down with the public, because sod-all folk would have the time or interest to watch PTV. But she’s not shy of a scrap & in spite of my criticisms of her at times, she’s handling this well, all things considered. Sit down please.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              No doubt an ‘answer’ for you to the question: Why were ‘good looking horses’ prioritised over giving teachers a decent pay-rise would be because ‘good looking horses’ need to be even more good looking.

            • Gezza

               /  August 16, 2018

              Well that’s only because the answer to that is widely understood to go without saying: “In the overall scheme of things, with a Budget of lotsa billions – nobody but Nat supporters really gives a toss”. And what was National going to spend on them? I haven’t heard teachers crying out for tax cuts. Just be patient. Might turn out all right in the end.

              Bridges is not yet scoring real hits. Too slow. And I dunno how she’s managed it, but in the House Paula is now somehow managing to pull of the persona of a greying, middle-aged, tut-tutting, backchatting middle class housewife with ideas above her station & isn’t making any appreciable dents in Jacinda either, imo.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              Gezza: “They are also in a working coalition & confidence agreement with more than just a couple of pushover parties like the last lot, so they have to allocate spending to their policies or priorities as well”.

              This is also not true in terms of the public sector. The Labour pre-election budget had bugger all set aside for public service pay increases hence the 12 billion $ hole. That had nothing to do with post-election negotiations. All that did was make a very bad situation worse and who is ultimately to blame for selling out the public service in order to gain power?

            • Gezza

               /  August 16, 2018

              I don’t really see this as a major problem for this government yet, PDB. Pretty sure everyone who needs to will either ultimately be accommodated or simply told what they can’t get (as is perceived to be the most sppropriate response to the group concerned) for this budget year.

              By next year’s Budget, this new government & Finance Minister will be well & truly blooded & should know better how to best manage (& keep contingency money in reserve for) the next fiscal year.

              But we’ll see. Labour’s weakest links are Twyford, Clark, & Curran probably. I’ve even got used to Jonesy’s pompously flowery pronouncements: he’s made it his trademark, can be very amusing, but actually it’s all correct usage & he’s a smarter politician than I gave him credit for.

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              Yes – the next budget is the key one as it is the first truly under their own steam and of their own making. Robertson has already sneakily borrowed an extra 6.5 billion through the back door https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12104552 on top of the extra he was already going to borrow so money may be hard to come by.

            • Blazer

               /  August 16, 2018

              @PDB…how can money get ‘hard to come by’…you say compared to other countries NZ’s borrowing as a % of GDP is relatively modest.
              The world is awash with money to lend.

            • Gezza

               /  August 16, 2018

              Robertson has already sneakily borrowed an extra 6.5 billion through the back door on top of the extra he was already going to borrow so money may be hard to come by.

              @PDB. Look, don’t worry bro. With the money that’s also I hear going in to R&D, Shaneo might be able to end up growing money on trees. 🌳 💵

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              @Blazer.. Labour has committed to not borrowing any more than stated & have temporarily shelved major tax hikes.

              How can you say “compared to other countries NZ’s borrowing as a % of GDP is relatively modest” when elsewhere you moan about National borrowing only for future generations to pay off?

            • PDB

               /  August 16, 2018

              wrong quote, should have quoted your “The world is awash with money to lend.” statement.

            • Blazer

               /  August 16, 2018

              @PDB…there is an infinite amount of ‘money’ out there..look at this magic show…

              ‘An important asset class. A hilarious understatement. Let’s see… the “notional amount” of $500 trillion is 25 times the GDP of the US and about 7 times global GDP. Derivatives are not just an “important asset class,” like bonds; they’re the largest “financial weapons of mass destruction,” as Warren Buffett called them in 2003.’…Business insider NY.

  6. Blazer

     /  August 16, 2018

    Heard David Carter in the house ,ranting about the passing of the Foreign buyers bill.He predicted doom and disaster….but,but David how can locking out LESS than 3% of buyers…be so dire.
    National and Co…weren’t LYING…were they?

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  August 16, 2018

      Watch the NZ$, B. It will call you out as usual.

    • High Flying Duck

       /  August 16, 2018

      It’s the message it sends that overseas investment is not wanted here and the shutters are coming down.
      Many projects are being cancelled or postponed and things are stalling – we need more overseas money to come in, not less.
      There was a strong chorus of dissent about this legislation from many quarters, including Councils.
      Try joining those dots.

      • robertguyton

         /  August 16, 2018

        The latest surveys of business confidence done in Southland show…high levels of confidence across sectors, evidenced by the stated intentions of businesses here to hire more staff in the coming months. The doom and gloom oozing from the National-aligned “big business” elsewhere in the country is just…strategic moaning, Imo.

        • PDB

           /  August 16, 2018

          That’ll save the whole country Robert – the Southland economy!

      • Blazer

         /  August 16, 2018

        if you think buying up property is ‘overseas investment’…think again.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  August 16, 2018

          Of course it is. Think yourself.

          • Blazer

             /  August 16, 2018

            its an invest ment for the buyer…certainly not for NZ.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  August 16, 2018

              The money he pays goes into the pocket of a seller who invests or spends it here.

        • High Flying Duck

           /  August 16, 2018

          A lot of property investment is the building of and sales of property. It is also in conjunction with other activities.- why invest here if you can’t buy a home?
          It is a stupid policy and will have negative repercussions on the economy.

          • Blazer

             /  August 16, 2018

            don’t worry..you bought your house to live in ..you’ll be right.

            Vancouver data shows foreign domiciled buyers contributed less tax than a refugee.

  1. Ardern showed her mettle, Bridges ineffective — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition