“I’ve always felt Corbyn is maligned by the mainstream media”

A lot of politicians think that they don’t get a fair go from media. Seeing politicians speaking in person can either confirm or change perceptions of them.

I heard John Key speak once, and he was very good, he probably came across better in person than on TV.

I went to one of Andrew Little’s public meetings and he was as flat and uninspiring as  he was when appearing on TV.

I saw Winston Peters speak at an NZ First conference and he was much as expected – he repeated a lot of stuff he had done before for years, including ‘jokes’. One of the more notable aspects of that experience was a young supporter sitting in front of me, she seemed to hardly listen to Winston’s speech, too busy yapping to neighbours, but whenever there was clapping she turned towards the stage and cheered.

Peter Dunne was good in person, seemed genuine and spoke well.

Metiria Turei was popular at Dunedin campaign meetings and was obviously respected and listened to intently.

David Clark was a journeyman political reciter at campaign meetings.

John Banks was better than expected when talking at an ACT regional conference.

David Seymour impressed at another ACT event before he was elected MP for Epsom, but then ACT leader Jamie Whyte was disappointing.

Here is William Sutcliffe’s impression of  UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn:

I’ve always felt Corbyn is maligned by the mainstream media, so I went to this – to hear him speak in a non-confrontational setting. What I learned is that he is flat, uninspiring, repetitive, dreary, inarticulate and vague. Bitterly disappointing and enraging.

In response to almost every question, the needle fell into the same groove about inequality. No vision or broad view of complex issues. He claimed to be anti-Brexit, but I got the feeling he would have said the opposite if the event had been in Sunderland.

His longest and most engaged answer was to an audience question about 70s leftists in Chile. I hoped to find a Corbyn who would contradict the parodies of him. I left with all my worst fears confirmed. This is a country without an opposition.

A university student asked him for a list of books that would inspire her politically. He rambled on (again) about inequality and failed to name a single book.

Sutcilffe’s Twitter blurb: “Author of books for children, young adults and old adults. Are You Experienced?, The Wall, Concentr8, etc. We See Everything”out now in paperback.

17 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  August 22, 2018

    I met David Lange once, asked a question and got a dodgy answer. Didn’t trust him after that. Have to say Jim Anderton was more impressive though not as entertaining.

    • Blazer

       /  August 22, 2018

      surely you remember the question and answer.
      Lets hear it and see if your impression is…reasonable.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 22, 2018

        The question was his stance on abortion. He fudged.

        • Gezza

           /  August 22, 2018

          Sounds reasonable. Simply a raconteur, amateur comedian & general windbag who handed over the reigns to coup plotters led by Douglas, went off somewhere to work on new material & shag the secretary, & then returned to discover what had been going on & jacked it in to go on the speaking circuit.

  2. Missy

     /  August 22, 2018

    That pretty much sums up my impressions of Corbyn, with the exception of when he is being interviewed by a woman – then he is just patronising and talks to the interviewer as if she is a child, I really believe he is a misogynist who does not like being questioned by women. Otherwise he is just dull, you only have to watch him at PMQs on a regular basis to see that he is generally a dull and uninspiring individual.

    That the worst PM in decades (including Gordon Brown) can still out poll him regularly says a lot about the sad state of the UK opposition.

    • Blazer

       /  August 22, 2018

      I see you have adopted a new favourite word…misogynist…another in the vein of ‘all men are….’

    • When you look at the current state UK politics, German politics, Australian politics and US politics, we should be grateful that things are relatively good here in New Zealand.

      Perhaps we don’t know how lucky we are.

      • David

         /  August 22, 2018

        Hell yes, we have had pretty much stable slightly right government for 18 years and looks likely to continue under Ardern.

  3. David

     /  August 22, 2018

    Its such a strange phenomenon that you have Corbyn and Bernie Sanders on either side of the Atlantic. Both ageing previously irrelevant and not exactly talented politicians with no achievements who want to turn the world back decades are now rock stars amongst young persons.

    • It’s also a strange phenomenon that Trump won in the US due to the support of a conservative religious base that turns a blind eye to his non Christian attributes and also the support of the ‘rust belt’ working class who are a big contrast to his big business and big money and ‘celebrity’ associations.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 22, 2018

        Trump’s success is surely an indication of how the Democrats have alienated the two groups you mention.

        • In part, yes. Clinton was a disaster, and the Democrats are dire. That they lost to someone like Trump is fairly damning.

      • David

         /  August 22, 2018

        Conservative Christians were put on the outer by Obama and Trump has given them a few things that while not huge were very important to Christians, America is very religious, and they overlook his exciting private life as its between him and his god.
        He has long championed rustbelt issues that have been ignored by the coastal elites, before he decided to run and its kind of ironic a NY billionaire has a better understanding of the working class than the Democrats. He is off today to get a rousing reception from miners today.

    • Blazer

       /  August 22, 2018

      So you are very happy with the present state of the world David?
      Ludicrous inequality,tension in the middle east,Korea ,Africa,Sth America….really fine and dandy ,a world awash with quadrillions of derivatives and unpayable debt as the ponzi scheme rolls on.

      • David

         /  August 22, 2018

        Course I am happy with the world, there has never been a better time to live and thanks to capitalism the world will continue to get better, always has and always will.
        Grab a newspaper from 1970, 1960, 1940 and 1900 and tell me the world is going to hell in a handcart.

      • spanish_tudor

         /  August 22, 2018

        Why 2017 was the best year in human history – debunking what all the miserable leftists keep moaning about.

  1. “I’ve always felt Corbyn is maligned by the mainstream media” — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition