Media watch – Wednesday

29 August 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

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9 Comments

  1. Another in a series of NZ wide articles on Catholic priest abuses and failure of the church to protect children from predatory priests.

    Reply
    • Griff.

       /  August 29, 2018

      The culture of respect for religion has gone too far .
      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/aug/28/religion-ireland-catholicism-abusers
      Ireland’s confrontation with its dark past shines a searchlight on Catholicism. But all religions can be havens for abusers

      Ireland’s confrontation with its dark past shines a searchlight on Catholicism. But then
      all religions can be havens for abusers, similarly tainted, equally founded on controlling women’s bodies. The Church of England was shown this year to have downplayed thousands of cases to protect its reputation, examining 40,000 accusations but accepting only 13. Cases emerge from madrassas, yeshivas, temples, mosques and churches with warnings they are just the tip of iceberg. Wherever a community is in thrall to elders of a faith that defines their identity, few dare risk the threat of expulsion from a way of life.

      Cases abound: the imam imprisoned for 13 years for abusing young girls in his Qur’an class or the BBC’s exposé of more than 400 children abused in madrassas. Despite plentiful cases among Jehovah’s Witnesses, their rules still insist on two witnesses before a victim is believed. A Plymouth Brethren case reflects the same pressure on all these communities – a 12-year-old raped by a senior elder was forced by her mother to write a letter denying her own allegation. Riots by Sikhs who forced the Birmingham Rep to cancel a play about rape in a temple warned anyone exposing their faith to expect retribution. Buddhism is rife with cases – the leader of Shambhala International, the west’s largest organisation, resigned last year following abuse claims.

      Sniped from a rather long opinion piece the rest is well worth a read .

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  August 29, 2018

        Some horrific stories and histories. I don’t think the Catholic religion does itself any favours with its bizarre and twisted attitude to sex and preaching.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  August 29, 2018

          I saw on tv that Pope Francis unexpectedly issued a sweeping apology on Sunday for the “crimes” of the Catholic Church in Ireland, saying church officials regularly didn’t respond with compassion to the many abuses children and women suffered over the years and vowing to work for justice.

          He read the apology out loud, citing numerous examples of abuses at the start of an outdoor Mass in Dublin’s Phoenix Park.

          What was striking though was an aerial view of the crowd. This is Dublin, Ireland. The crowd even a decade ago would have been enormous – this one was tiny.

          Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  August 29, 2018

    Amanda Gillies said on the AM show that Julie Bishop is being tipped to be the next Governor-General of Australia.

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/julie-bishops-stocks-rise-as-next-governorgeneral/news-story/701d7bbe7177684cb615c971fe5d2e5a

    Reply
  3. Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  August 29, 2018

      Good to see the language thriving, but that effort by The Observer seems a bit rose tinted to me.

      Reply
  4. NOEL

     /  August 29, 2018

    Overseas in Asia recently responded to Gidday with Kia Ora. Surprising the numbers responding with “Oh Kiwi.”

    Reply

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