Minister criticises two Cabinet colleagues over lack of interest in Whānau Ora

Peeni henare, Minister of Whānau Ora, has criticised Cabinet Ministers David Clark (Health) and Chris Hipkins (Education) for their lack of interest in progressing the Whānau Ora programme.

Maori Television:  Ministers’ lack of interest a barrier for Whānau Ora

Minister of Whānau Ora Peeni Henare says a lack of invested interest from the ministers of health and education is proving to be a barrier and he’s making their inclusion a priority.

Auckland was flooded today with Whānau Ora specialists.  However the minister says, the lack of investment from some is a barrier to the progression of the program.

Henare says, ‘I’ve been to a lot of hui to speak about Whānau Ora and the ones who aren’t at the table are the health and education ministers.”

That’s significant criticism of fellow Ministers.

Ex Labour party MP and Maori Party minister Tariana Turia calls it racism.

Dame Tariana Turia says, “We haven’t had all the government agencies see Whānau Ora as the way forward.  In actual fact, they keep coming up with new ideas, new programmes, new opportunities and essentially it’s to put Whānau Ora on the side.”

Turia says a lot of those attitudes stem from racism.

“We have huge institutional racism in this country, that’s the reality and [will be] until non-Māori see Māori as the answer to the issues impacting on them that have been caused by others.”

Ex Labour MP John Tamihere agrees:

“Out of all the money voted out of parliament every year, 98.8 percent of it goes to Pākehā, for Māori by Pākehā, that just can’t continue.”

Despite now holding all the Māori seats now Labour are struggling to deliver for them – or they just aren’t interested.

40 Comments

  1. Kitty Catkin

     /  September 10, 2018

    He means that people are uninterested, not disinterested.There is a big difference between the two.

    Disinterest is impartiality, having no personal or financial involvement. If I was wrongly accused of murder, I would hope that the judge was DISINTERESTED but would also hope that they were not UNINTERESTED !

  2. Gezza

     /  September 10, 2018

    Shouldn’t be a problem. Jacinda was on 1ewes tonight visiting a school for Maori Language Week and I think struggling with a little bit of Maori. One of the kids asked her pleasantly if she was going to make sure all kids learn Maori. And she hummed a bit and said no but only because there was a simple reason for that: not enough Maori teachers. Someone asked her how many Maori teachers we need and she was stuck. Luckily Kelvin was behind her and she turned to him and he gave the answer – “heaps”. So that’s what she agreed was the number..

    • robertguyton

       /  September 10, 2018

      So…she speaks the language.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  September 10, 2018

        It didn’t sound much like it. Knowing a few phrases doesn’t mean that one ‘speaks’ a language.

        • robertguyton

           /  September 10, 2018

          You…missed my…point.

          • Gezza

             /  September 10, 2018

            You missed making your point. That’s what happens when you try to be too clever like a 10 year old.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              Really! Okay, the joke was “heaps”, okay? “Heaps” is an expression used by Maori people in NZ, heaps! Jacinda used the word, showing that she’s down with Maori. I know “explaining is claimed to be losing by Rightwing meme creators” but, come on you people, sharpen up!

            • Gezza

               /  September 10, 2018

              Oh, I know that. I’m more au fait with Te Reo and bros and tuakana and tuahine and Maori than Kitty is.

              Your problem is when you’re too much of a smart arse it’s going to go straight over the heads of people who’re not & who you’re therefore taking childish pot shots at.

              Grow the fuck up.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              Done, Gezza. many thanks. Enjoy.

            • Gezza

               /  September 10, 2018

              “Heaps” is an expression used by Maori people in NZ, heaps! Jacinda used the word, showing that she’s down with Maori.

              She didn’t have a fucking clue “heaps” is pakeha maori for tons.

            • Gezza

               /  September 10, 2018

              When it comes to things Maori robert it sticks out a mile Jacinda is “dumb as”, bro. She needs to get up to fracking speed, & bloody quickly.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  September 10, 2018

            What was the point ? I know a little Maori, but wouldn’t claim to speak it.

          • artcroft

             /  September 10, 2018

            Someone has to teach the maori king first.

            • Gezza

               /  September 10, 2018

              God I winced when Jacinda proudly announced Neve was “Tee Aroha”.

      • Gezza

         /  September 10, 2018

        Nope. She barely manages to pronounce English and her Te Reo pronunciation is disastrous. Naming Neve Te Aroha but actually being big on tokenism but not actually being committed to promoting things Maori but to “raising all boats” looks likely to become a big problem for her as Maori people begin to work out they’re not really all that much on her radar. Unless she starts to put them there.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 10, 2018

      She faffed around on 3 as well over this issue, although we were given to understand that little Neve would be bilingual. As we are unlikely to ever know if she is or not, this was an easy promise to make.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  September 10, 2018

        What would have happened if she had been born in Tutaekuri or Tutaenui ? Would she have called the baby that ?

        • robertguyton

           /  September 10, 2018

          Clever, Kitty: devastatingly clever (you know some mean Maori, aye!)

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  September 10, 2018

            Well, they are real places…

            • Gezza

               /  September 10, 2018

              Why do so many idiots say “aye” – which is English for “yes” and pronounced “eye” in dialects where they still use it, or in mariner parlance as in “aye aye cap’n” – when they seem to think it means “eh?” or “ay?”. Or in one recent case, the Maori “ae”?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 11, 2018

              Whaye indeed ? Aye and ay are both pron. (more or less) eye, they are the same word (Annandales)

              Aye have always heard ‘ae’ pron ‘ai’ (as in naive) by Maori and Pakeha.

  3. Griff.

     /  September 10, 2018

    More its all white mans fault from the Maori leadership .

    Billions squandered on treaty settlements yet Maori statistics have continued to decline .

    Half of all kids killed by “care givers”.
    Half of the prison population .
    Twice the welfare dependence than the rest of us .

    Until Maori take responsibility for the horrifying statistics we will see no change.
    It is Maori culture that is dysfunctional own it .

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 10, 2018

      I know some Tainui….guess how much of the settlement has gone to the ordinary Tainui people ?

      Yes, you guessed it, sweet FA.

      One man was offered a university scholarship that was about $1 a week. He told them to shove it.

      One of the things in the settlement was a lot of houses. A kaumatua friend wanted Tainui to have a rent to buy for those tenants who were Tainui. Instead, they sold them all as a job lot to a developer who was given a lot of flak until he was driven to go to the press and say that THEY had approached HIM, not the other way around, Bob T——- was distressed and furious that the Tainui bigwigs had denied the people the chance to own these houses because the bigwigs (two or three families, among them the Mahutas) wanted the money from a quick sale and didn’t give a damn about the ordinary people.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  September 10, 2018

    “Out of all the money voted out of parliament every year, 98.8 percent of it goes to Pākehā, for Māori by Pākehā, that just can’t continue.”

    Rubbish. The big votes are health, education and welfare. They are distributed via population not race.

    • Trevors_elbow

       /  September 10, 2018

      But telling the truth Al doesn’t make a good sound bite … Tamihere knows the truth but telling lies in that manner gives him cred with Maori who are disengaged and looking for excuses for their problems… so blame whitey for everything is a nice cop out

  5. Another Maori MP in favour of Whanau Ora:

    • Gezza

       /  September 10, 2018

      That’s odd. Which government was implementing whanau ora?

  6. David

     /  September 10, 2018

    Winston wont let it happen, he spent years trying to nail Tariana and Pita in parliament over it.

    • Gezza

       /  September 10, 2018

      Ultimately it might have to be sorted out with a verbal punch up.
      Or a real one if things get out of hand during that.
      Maori are expecting more specific Maori initiatives & funding from Jacinda & her pakeha colleagues than they have been intending to give. These guys sleepwalked Maori into voting for them because the Maori Party failed to deliver enuf.

  7. david in aus

     /  September 10, 2018

    I want results from Whānau Ora. If it’s working carry on and increase funding. If it is not making difference but costing a fortune – cut it.

    Where is the media? No facts or substance; just he said, she said reporting.

    • Gezza

       /  September 10, 2018

      That’s all you’re going to get from our media. Too fracking lazy to do anything else. Look at what they do every Waitangi Day.

  8. Geoffrey Monks

     /  September 10, 2018

    I have to agree with Griff. Had there been any improvement in the life expectations of Maori as a result of the huge off-shore borrowing to fund ‘settlements’ perhaps I would not. But the evidence is overwhelming: notwithstanding the hundreds of million dollars (is it billions yet?) invested in Maori, there has been no improvement. The new Maori princes would have us believe that in is only Pakeha dollars that can fix the social issues that Maori face. I think that is bollocks. When the grassroots participants in the multiple-ownership assets of the compensated iwi begin to show evidence of any benefit from the national investment, maybe I will reevaluate.

  9. Geoffrey Monks

     /  September 10, 2018

    And another thing… the language (or te Reo if you prefer). When I began learning to speak in Maori a few years back, I thoroughly enjoyed it. The dictionary that I was provided with had a few hundred core words plus a few thousand words that had been created to accomodate concepts and things not recognised in pre-European New Zealand. There are now substantially more coined words. To what end? No-one anywhere else in the world is going to learn Maori to interact with us. Only in New Zealand is there a place for Te Reo Maori. No scientist, mathematician, engineer, architect, musician, chef, builder, mechanic plus a number of others are going to learn Maori in order to do their job. No Maori who has insufficient grasp of English to engage in such professions is likely to benefit from attempting to engage in them whilst being confined to the language of an earlier culture.
    We waste time and resources trying to force a recently reinvented language onto an unwilling people. Better to recognise Te Reo Maori as a wonderfully poetic window into a past that has gone.