Te Wiki o te Reo Māori (Māori language week)

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori

 

‘He mauri te reo Māori nō Aotearoa māu, mā tātou katoa’

‘MAKE TE REO MĀORI AN ESSENTIAL PART OF NEW ZEALAND FOR YOU, FOR US ALL’

Ahakoa iti, ākona, kōrerotia – Learn a little, use a little

 

58 Comments

  1. sorethumb

     /  September 10, 2018

    Nothing new then. How about a te reo free day so we can have a breather?

  2. sorethumb

     /  September 10, 2018

    Duncan Garner says that they make it compulsory at Auckland Grammar (Tamati McKowrua) and 90% vote with their feet next year. The Government are trying to push up Maori and downsize Pakeha as they owe Maori (they feel) but want Pakeha to be “the same as everyone else” (Spoonley).

  3. david in aus

     /  September 10, 2018

    They are getting closer. Soon compulsory Maori. Next, they tell you what to think and say by weaponizing political correctness.

    Maori is a fantastic language and transmits Maori culture and beliefs but it should never be made compulsory. It is a Trojan horse to inculcate Maoriness into all spheres of NZ life. And also a make-work scheme for Maori speakers.

    The road to serfdom is coming into view.

    • robertguyton

       /  September 10, 2018

      “Maori is a fantastic language” says David in Aus.
      Ka pai, David!

  4. david in aus

     /  September 10, 2018

    The peculiarity of Maori culture in NZ is the levels of fundamentalism. The Maori population in NZ is of an admixture. There are degrees of affiliation and connectedness to traditional Maori culture. However, it is the fundamentalists that have the voice.

    Perhaps it is a reflection of the insecurity of the culture. But when you look at the proponents they have an overarching Left-wing identity-politics agenda. It is really about asserting dominance.
    The underlying message is “We are the ‘real’ owners of this land”, the rest a lesser Beings.

    • Blazer

       /  September 10, 2018

      ever though of migrating to…Australia?

      oops…I see …now.

      • david in aus

         /  September 10, 2018

        Sorry Blazer, I didn’t see any of your ideas. I guess if you don’t have anything intelligent to say -attack the person.

        • Blazer

           /  September 10, 2018

          this…’Perhaps it is a reflection of the insecurity of the culture.’….as an idea lacks any balance and is almost abstract or…absurd.

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  September 10, 2018

            is almost abstract or…absurd

            Self-referencing much.

            • Blazer

               /  September 10, 2018

              why is Al so bitter and miserable?
              Hey try Viagra…it won’t make you James Bond but it may make you…
              roger….more.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              I’m not at all bitter and miserable, just amused at the absurdity of your meaningless criticism of a perfectly reasonable comment by DiA.

            • Blazer

               /  September 10, 2018

              perfectly reasonable?-‘Perhaps it is a reflection of the insecurity of the culture. ‘!

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              The only word in any doubt there is “Perhaps”.

    • robertguyton

       /  September 10, 2018

      “it is the fundamentalists that have the voice”
      Good observation. All fundamentalists, whatever the genre, “have the voice”.
      Very profound, david in aus.

    • sorethumb

       /  September 10, 2018

      In the 1956 Census European = 95%? Funny that.

  5. Griff.

     /  September 10, 2018

    I am over it already.

    Spending billions trying to keep Maori going in a waste of time and money.
    The language is able to be spoken by less than 5% of us and declining.
    Let it die.

    • david in aus

       /  September 10, 2018

      The people keeping a language alive are those who value it and use. Government dictates never the solution to cultural issues. It is up to Maori households.

      By all means, our education system should support those making the effort. But compulsion is not an answer. People must want it.

      • Blazer

         /  September 10, 2018

        people have things foistered on them whether they ‘want’ them or not.

        Just like banning smoking in public places…you will get over it.

        • david in aus

           /  September 10, 2018

          Your concept of compulsion and liberty are worrying. Smoking is banned is because of the harm to others.

          I am not sure of your point.

          • Blazer

             /  September 10, 2018

            what about tax?

            what about alcohol?

            • Griff.

               /  September 10, 2018

              Alcohol use is also restricted in public.
              Tabasco is taxed out of proportion to the harm it does.
              More revenue is gained than its use costs the government .
              Alcohol is not taxed enough to offset its harm.
              Are you suggesting we tax Maori users to offset the cost of supporting the language?
              That idea has my support .

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018
            • Griff.

               /  September 10, 2018

              My excuse this week is new glasses .
              Progressive lenses and I forget to look down though the near sight portion.
              Stay tuned.
              Next week i will find another one to justify my atrocious spelling and lazy proof reading.

        • PartisanZ

           /  September 10, 2018

          Like compulsorily having to learn English if you’re Maori …

          Like compulsorily having to go to school for that matter …

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  September 10, 2018

            Those are qualifications for contributing positively rather than negatively as an adult to our community, PZ.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              Matter
              of
              opinion
              Alan.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              Nope, rational sanity, Robert. A recipe for making useful stuff for others rather than robbing them – capitalism vs socialism.

            • PartisanZ

               /  September 10, 2018

              Useful stuff like Meat & Dairy Alan …?

          • David in Aus

             /  September 10, 2018

            English is a compulsory language to enable participation in NZ society and it is not being used as a cudgel to enforce ideology.
            The Maori language for all its virtues does not have socio-economic currency that English has. If powerful Maori business and people would like to only conduct business only in Maori, all power to them; But it should not be the role of government.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              “it is not being used as a cudgel to enforce ideology.”
              Yes
              it
              is!

            • PartisanZ

               /  September 10, 2018

              “English … is not being used as a cudgel to enforce ideology.”

              And presumably never has been …?

              A FFS moment if ever there was one!

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              I’m taking a moment to brew a nice cuppa Celon’s finest while my heart settles down a little…

            • David in Aus

               /  September 10, 2018

              @robertguyton“it is not being used as a cudgel to enforce ideology.”
              Yes, it is!

              There is an element of truth there. Language transmits sets of beliefs and codes of behaviour. There are concepts and words in some languages that are not present in others.

              English in NZ, is the language of day-to-day, basic communication and commerce. It does transmit Anglo-sphere values but its main purpose is communication.

              The proposed compulsory Maori in school has nothing to do with communication but rather indoctrination. There are very few fluent Maori speakers who are not also fluent in English.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              There are very few poets in NZ. Poetry should not be taught in NZ schools. ‘K?

            • David in Aus

               /  September 10, 2018

              few poets- Poetry should not be taught in NZ schools.

              I agree to an extent but it is a matter of degree. Poetry is taught much less in school than in the past. New media has taken over: Presentations, Film, and interpretation of print media have largely replaced poetry in the syllabus.

              Poetry is less relevant today.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 10, 2018

              Poetry is needed now more than ever before. Our “prosaic” approach to living has produced…the mess we find ourselves now in. To get out of that. we need to employ a different way of thinking – poetry can describe a new path and provide us a new language for travelling that path.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              Speak for yourself, Robert. I don’t find myself in a mess. In fact I spent yesterday fixing a big mess my wife had made on our deck. Pristine now.

              As for poetry, it is just one art of many and formalising what many do informally – using language and analogy to charm, persuade, console and entertain. We all experience that far, far more frequently than we read or hear formal poetry and by far the most poetry we do hear is in music.

            • David in Aus

               /  September 10, 2018

              “Poetry is needed now more than ever before” That is your opinion.

              I don’t agree with you. Expressing oneself in an articulate manner is powerful, whatever the form of communication.

              Prose, radio, TV, film and even Youtube are more powerful forms of communication. The scope for discussing complex ideas in poetry in a deep and meaningful way is very limited.

              It is of the same status as calligraphy, I’m afraid. A form of expression that is pleasing aesthetically but limited.

              You can keep your Haikus.

  6. Zedd

     /  September 10, 2018

    kia ora koutou..
    I agree that ‘Te Reo’ should be seen as ‘Te Reo o tenei whenua.. Aotearoa’ (the language of this land)

    Maori iwi are ‘nga Tangata’…. ‘Te Reo’ is the language

    btw; when my whanau emigrated to NZ (1970s) I was surprised that at school they taught, mostly English history & French, Latin & German languages etc.
    Not much NZ history or Te Reo at my schools 😦

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  September 10, 2018

      Maori is useful when its words add richness and meaning to our language. That should be the criteria for non-Maori.

      • Griff.

         /  September 10, 2018

        That is English for you Alan.
        Even the word English signifies the ongoing assimilation of other cultures that is English .
        English dates from the invasion of the UK by Germanic tribes in about 450 ce.
        We dont really retain any words before that date that belong to those that called England home.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  September 10, 2018

          (I know. I was keeping that quiet to avoid upsetting the PC mob, Griff.)

        • Zedd

           /  September 10, 2018

          “you will be assimilated.. resistance is futile !”
          …or is it ?

          • Zedd

             /  September 10, 2018

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  September 10, 2018

            We are all assimilated, Zedd. The only question is degree and direction. That is the inevitable consequence of being social animals.

            • Zedd

               /  September 10, 2018

              “Resistance is NOT futile” just ask Capt Picard & his crew ! 😀

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              Not much resistance in our professional media, I suspect Zedd. They’ll all be towing the party line this week.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  September 10, 2018

              Damn: toeing. It’s amazing what you type when you are sounding the phrase in your head and not thinking about the writing.

  7. sorethumb

     /  September 10, 2018

    I saw people on FB saying their is lots of evidence that learning a second language is…..
    But
    Bryan Caplan, an economist at George Mason University, talks about how much time the average U.S. student spends learning a language, and how well that learning is retained. (Spoiler alert: not very well!) Caplan also tells us what he really thinks about foreign language education in the U.S.:

    CAPLAN: If people are going to get some basic career benefit out of it, or it enriches their personal life, then foreign language study is great. But if it’s a language that doesn’t really help their career, they’re not going to use it, and they’re not happy when they’re there, I really don’t see the point, it seems cruel to me.

    Perhaps most important, Caplan points to the opportunity cost of language study:

    CAPLAN: There are so many kids who remain barely literate, and numerate in their own language.
    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/is-learning-a-foreign-language-really-worth-it-a-new-freakonomics-radio-podcast/

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  September 10, 2018

      Learning a foreign language taught me that it wasn’t something I wanted to do. I guess that was useful.

  8. Steve Wrathall

     /  September 10, 2018

    To those saying Te Reo should be compulsory in Schools because it is an official language: It was explicitly promised by the government at the time of the 1987 Maori Language Act that this would not make Te Reo compulsory to anyone. https://twitter.com/SteveHWrathall/status/1038978402626093056

  9. lurcher1948

     /  September 10, 2018

    They dont like you over at the hatefeast called Kiwiblog,PG but hang in there.
    Pete George
    Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

    Thumb up 15 Thumb down 74 LOG IN TO REPLY REPORTSEPTEMBER 10, 2018 8:00AM

  10. lurcher1948

     /  September 10, 2018

    I think forcing te Reo on the WHOLE COUNTRY without consulting the country is covered by a common phrase”its a load of paru”

  11. alloytoo

     /  September 10, 2018

    Forcing a language on a child will have absolutely no impact in the long term usage of the language if the child has no need or intention of using it in every day life.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  September 10, 2018

      True. Teaching Latin didn’t bring it back to life.

  12. sorethumb

     /  September 10, 2018

    Notice the tactics: In the media every one , just everyone wants to learn te reo (thinking of The AM Show and RNZ).

  13. Nick

     /  September 16, 2018

    Why is there so much reverence for this primitive culture? At the time Captain Cook arrived Maori were a violent, warring people who were cannibalising each other and shrinking heads. Something the PC crowd likes to gloss over. The Maori people exterminated the Moriori. As ‘caretakers of the land’ they killed off about 200 species of native animals – including the Moa which might’ve been nice to have around.. And they were really only here a short time here before Europeans arrived. Is this really the culture we want to teach our kids?

    As someone of European origin, I have a proud history, and ancestors and a culture that’s more sophisticated and developed and dates back a lot further than Maori. Now normally you wouldn’t try to compare them, but I’m trying to make the point here, that English too deserves a bit of respect. So I’m not too excited about an ad on TVNZ for Maori Language week that says “English sucks”.

    I don’t mind if Maoris want to learn Maori. But now I’m getting angry. Leave me and mine alone. It’s not my culture, not my language. And while you’re at it, don’t denigrate English – that just gets my back up and makes me anti Maori language – surely the opposite of what the ad is trying to achieve.