Bridges still complaining about compensating meth house victims

No one has suggested that drug dealers should be given any money when it was announced that people evicted from state houses over the meth contamination panic – see Housing NZ to compensate 800 tenants over bogus meth testing

The apology and offer to compensate kicked-out tenants by between $2500 and $3000 comes as a report into the agency’s meth testing regime was finally released on Thursday morning.

It found that between July 2013 and May 2018 nearly 5000 Housing New Zealand (HNZ) properties were tested for meth contamination, with about half of these tests testing positive for the too-low standard at the time.

Just one in five primary tenants were rehoused. The majority, just under 800, were found responsible and were kicked out of their properties, and 275 tenants were suspended from being housed by the agency for a period of one year.

Just one fifth of the tested properties would fail the new standard set in May, which is ten times higher than the previous extremely low trigger.

Given most homes have more than one person but just a single primary tenants, around 2400 people were likely affected.

Furthermore, about $7m in damages was charged to 542 tenants. But less than two per cent of this was actually recovered before HNZ stopped seeking them earlier in 2017, and that debt has now been cancelled.

But that’s the line of attack that National leader Simon Bridges took last week:

Remarkable Bridges is continuing his opposition to “what Phil Twyford is doing” this morning.

Bridges agrees with compensation but is barking at a passing Twyford regardless.

Jones is happy to see Bridges making a mess of leading the Opposition.

Phil Twyford has run in after Bridges’ interview making it clear that no ex state tenant convicted of meth manufacture or dealing will get compensation.

Bridges is not only barking at a passing car, he is inventing the car.

92 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  September 24, 2018

    Bridges and Collins both trying to beat up the Labour soft on criminals line…and actually hanging themselves..slowly.

  2. lurcher1948

     /  September 24, 2018

    I amazed anyone understands what he says,Bridges mumbling and crusher”Collins always grinning like a cat that got the cream, Jacindas safe why the B team dribble on.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 24, 2018

      I have no trouble understanding Simon Bridges; is it your hearing ? Deaf people always say that others are mumbling.

      • robertguyton

         /  September 24, 2018

        Not everyone has a functioning mumble-filter, Kitty. It’s wonderful that you can understand Simon – what’s he saying? Something about tourettes?…tourism…???

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 24, 2018

          I have normal hearing. that’s all. Perhaps when I am old, I will be like you and Lurch and have trouble with understanding what people are saying and think that people are mumbling when they are doing no such thing. There are excellent hearing-aids on the market now. Or you could try an eartrumpet.

          Lawyers are not know for unclear speech; it must be you and Lurch whose hearing is the problem.

          The context should tell you which it is; make an intelligent guess.

          • robertguyton

             /  September 24, 2018

            Bridge’s diction is poor. You are building a flimsy case. My hearing, tested recently, is excellent – what???

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              Bridges’

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              If everyone had your trouble, you might have a case.

              If you can’t afford hearing aids, try a lemon in each ear; lemonaids.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              “Bugalugs”, ever hear that one, Kitty? Someone who “earwigs” the conversations of others. I’m not meaning anyone here, just remembering back…my mum used to use the word, “bugalugs”.

  3. PartisanZ

     /  September 24, 2018

    National must be receiving exceedingly poor political advice &/or directives from somebody …

    As pointed out by Corky [I think?] a while ago, it’s nice to know that conservatives find this comforting …

  4. robertguyton

     /  September 24, 2018

    “Twisted sister mounting ludicrous defences doesn’t cut it against fair-minded relentless positivity” – Jane Bowron on Collins’ meth nonsense.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 24, 2018

      The thought of relentless positivity is hideous. That sounds like mindlessly grinning and dismissing danger signals, like some idiot ignoring the flashing lights on the dashboard.

      • robertguyton

         /  September 24, 2018

        “fair-minded relentless positivity”, to be fair.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 24, 2018

          Even that is an appalling prospect.

          • robertguyton

             /  September 24, 2018

            To you. Why do you defend Bridges (regularly) and attack Jacinda (regularly)?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              Because I think that she is a fluffette, and that he is treated with a childish spite that has nothing to do with reality.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              I bet whatshisname is buoyed by your support and St. Jacinda utterly unfazed by the lack thereof.

  5. duperez

     /  September 24, 2018

    Over years I’d heard references to the best young legal minds from around the world congregating in fancy universities like Oxford. There the ebb and flow of discussion and debate of notions and nuances of justice and law fertilised and formed the young minds.

    Simon Bridges must have been busy on his much mentioned stint at Oxford when they had the sessions about doing ‘what is right.’ Maybe he was cloistered at a meticulous desk surrounded by motivational sayings and whakatauki in his faraway outpost. Did the biggest and boldest ones of those proclaim: “What is right for oneself is the only right” or “The only place Justice is ahead of Politics is in the dictionary”?

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 24, 2018

      I hardly think so.

      Oxford a ‘fancy’ university ? It’s an ancient and prestigious one, and incredibly beautiful, but fancy is hardly the word that anyone who’s been there would use.

      What is a meticulous desk ? My desk is an inanimate object.

      • duperez

         /  September 24, 2018

        Anyone not getting Oxford being called ‘fancy’ was likely to struggle with a ‘meticulous’ desk.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 24, 2018

          Oxford is ‘dreaming spires’, one of the loveliest cities in the UK as well as being a great seat of learning; one doesn’t call it ‘fancy’. I take it that you have never been there. It’s absurd to call it fancy, it’s like calling Michelangelo’s David a nice ornament.

          You must mean a meticulously tidy desk.

          • robertguyton

             /  September 24, 2018

            Calling Mikey’s Dave, “a nice ornament” is pretty cool in my book.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              Spare me.

              Did you ever see Shakespeare’s Painted Room in Oxford (I am assuming that you have been there) ? What luck that it was panelled over and not painted over.

              We had a friend who was an Oxford don and lived in a beautiful old house by the river full of books, floor to celing, lucky sod.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              We once uncovered a tiled fireplace that featured scenes from Romeo & Juliet, beautiful; fortunately, it had been plywood-over, rather than painted. But a “river full of books” – can’t beat that story!

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 24, 2018

          I have spent a lot of time in Oxford, and can assure you that there is nothing ‘fancy’ about it. That’s a silly, trivial word to use of it. Just as meticulous is a silly word to use of an inanimate object.

          • robertguyton

             /  September 24, 2018

            While you were there, did you wear your fancy pants?

          • duperez

             /  September 24, 2018

            I guess I’ll have to accept that the absurd responses of Bridges and Collins have you discombobulated given the bewildering reaction. Or, since we seem to be in Extremely Pedantic Street, maybe that should be the bewildering response of those ‘leaders’ ending in your absurd reaction.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              It may be bewildering to you, but to anyone who has travelled & is well-read, it wouldn’t be.

              And no, they haven’t. Straw man argument.

  6. NOEL

     /  September 24, 2018

    “Just one in five primary tenants were rehoused. The majority, just under 800, were found responsible and were kicked out of their properties, and 275 tenants were suspended from being housed by the agency for a period of one year.”

    There was no specific clause for using meth in a HCNZ tenancy agreements. It’s was covered by another clause.

    If a former tenant of a private rental with the same agreement was to seek compensation in the Courts they wouldn’t be successful.

  7. robertguyton

     /  September 24, 2018

    Bridges reduced to big noting; “I was in the same room as Jacinda!

    “Simon Bridges says he and Jacinda Ardern have been working behind the scenes to develop an “enduring” plan to combat climate change.

    He told The AM Show on Monday he’s had one private meeting with Ms Ardern,”

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 24, 2018

      That is hardly big noting. I am sure that he has been in the same room as Jacinda Ardern too many times to count, so is unlikely to have used the words that you attribute to him, or anything like them.

      • robertguyton

         /  September 24, 2018

        Does Simon struggle with counting as well?

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 24, 2018

          They have both been in politics for a long time; the chances of their being in the same room once in all those years are zero. You do realise that they are in the chamber at the same time…how could anyone count the number of times that they have been in the same room ? It must be in the hundreds.

          • robertguyton

             /  September 24, 2018

            Is the chamber a room? Why is it called a chamber?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              Debating Chamber. It’s another word for a room, but this sort of ‘room’ is usually called a chamber. It has been for a very long time.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              If you’re in the gallery of the House, are you in the same room as the politicians?

  8. It sounds like Natl are still chanting ‘Tough on Drug Crime & ZERO-tolerance’ even if there is no evidence that those evicted were even responsible for the ‘Meth contamination’

    How narrow-minded.. Its interesting that Customs checking of shipping containers, reportedly went down under Natl.. which was suggested to be a major reason the precursors (from China) started to flood in to NZ ?
    They also promoted the Sky City Casino in Akld.. which has been referred to as ‘a Chinese laundry’

    ‘we’re Tough on Drug Crime’ but ‘lets just make it easier to get the stuff in’ & promote money laundering of the profits which could well be used, to buy up all the real estate ??

    go figure…. hints & allegations.. rumors & innuendo :/ 😦

    • Blazer

       /  September 24, 2018

      National we love banks,we love board positions at Chinese coys…

      A series of former National leaders of the past have also had success in gaining paid positions on banks, albeit the New Zealand branch boards.

      STACY SQUIRES/STUFF
      Former prime minister Sir John Key has joined the ANZ board.

      As well as chairing Genesis Energy, Dame Jenny Shipley has been a director on the New Zealand board of the China Construction Bank, Don Brash has sat on the board of the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, while Sir John Key recently joined the New Zealand board of ANZ as chairman.

      Chinese companies often view politicians as celebrities, and as a former Prime Minister, English’s star is likely to be bright for Chinese companies doing business here.

      There have been suggestions that English may look for an international position, possibly with the IMF’

      Not hard to see why the Nats hate Kiwi Bank which keeps profits in NZ…is it?

      • PartisanZ

         /  September 24, 2018

        God, that’s kinda depressing Blazer … Makes me think the Nats don’t need to give a hoot about what they’re politicians do and say … They’re in charge of all the big ‘policy making’ players anyhow …

  9. david in aus

     /  September 24, 2018

    I don’t think the stance by Bridges is a loser. People on the public teat, supposedly financially disadvantaged but have the money to use expensive illicit drugs. They break the conditions of their lease and this government is compensating them for their breach.

    Wow, thoughts on what is right or wrong are seriously ‘reinterpreted’ these days by some. However, I don’t think Middle NZers have changed their moral outlook.

    • robertguyton

       /  September 24, 2018

      “…Bridges is a loser. People on the public teat…”
      Isn’t Bridges one of those …on the public teat?

      • David in aus

         /  September 24, 2018

        Only if you think politicians are beneficiaries.
        If you don’t believe in work, it is easy to conflate elected politicians with those on welfare.
        If i was a landlord and a tenent was smoke meth in my property, i want them gone. I want compensation and not for me to give the lawbreaker money.

        • robertguyton

           /  September 24, 2018

          What if they hadn’t smoked meth and in fact it was the tenant before them that had? Testing couldn’t differentiate, yet good people got tossed out, to the wolves, as a result of un-nuanced policy.

        • Blazer

           /  September 24, 2018

          you want compensation from the gummint…when the scenario you describe is a cost of doing business.
          Just love handouts you..righties.

          • David in Aus

             /  September 24, 2018

            No sue the tenant and claim the deposit from the tenancy tribunal.

            • Blazer

               /  September 24, 2018

              are they depositing 30k these days?Bol.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  September 24, 2018

              Anyone who thinks that politicians don’t work for their money is an idiot who has never known any.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              You can be “on the public teat” and work hard, no question.

  10. duperez

     /  September 24, 2018

    Someone on radio claimed to be in that position. Goes into a house, has it tested herself to ensure it’s safe, it makes the limit, she gets chucked out. According the David in aus and Simon Bridges that’s tough tittie. According toJudith Collins the woman is getting recompense so she can go back into a HousingNZ house and will cook meth there.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  September 24, 2018

      Did Judith Collins say that or are you putting words in her mouth ?

      • duperez

         /  September 24, 2018

        Because I’m struggling on a small device I can’t track it down. I posted the quote on here last week. Words from her mouth. I suppose she will find some agreeing that those getting recompense will use the money go back into their houses and cook up their meth. There are probably some who want to believe that each and every single one of them will do that. Judith will be pleased to have as many as possible in that sad delusional headspace. Not cooking and using but thinking that that is how it is and that she is The Answer.

  11. robertguyton

     /  September 24, 2018

    #Lets keep Simon

  12. Corky

     /  September 24, 2018

    I have just one wish…please Simon, while Jacinda is wowing everyone on the world stage..please keep your head down and mouth shut. This is Jacinda’s moment. Woman, baby, good looks and PM of a country is an unbeatable hand. If they interview you during this time your Billy Bunter persona will turn everyone off.

  13. David

     /  September 24, 2018

    Meth is a class A drug and is illegal to take, supply, and manufacture and that is what 800 of these people have been doing in what is a home subsidised by the taxpayer. Meth is expensive and how do you think people get the money for its use.
    The tenancy tribunal has smacked numerous landlords incredibly hard over trace residue of meth that was below the levels the government said was safe. Having a near zero tolerance level is appropriate when you are a landlord because the next tenant could well have a baby crawling across contaminated carpets and it does end up in their livers. No one knows for sure what is safe and not safe because meth users dont live long enough and dont live in houses long enough to establish safe levels.
    Compensation is a bloody outrage for the 800 who were known users, dealers or manufacturers..this isnt the cohort who were accused without proof.

    • High Flying Duck

       /  September 24, 2018

      David, get with the program – Class A drugs are a “health issue” these days, not a crime.
      You can ban pets and smoking, but once the glass barbie is in play, these people should be compensated for stinking up the place.

    • phantom snowflake

       /  September 24, 2018

      I am unable to tell whether you just don’t “get it” or you are deliberately spreading false information. Unfortunately there is no such doubt where Simon Bridges is concerned; he has access to all the relevant information.
      It’s really quite simple! No baseline tests for Methamphetamine were performed at the beginning of the tenancies of these ‘800’ who are referred to. Therefore there is no way of knowing who was responsible for the contamination or when it occurred!

      • David

         /  September 24, 2018

        No Snowflake the 800 are the ones where it was proven it was the thousands of others where compensation should be made.
        If you smoke it once in one of my houses you are out, if you cant smoke a cigarette in a rental why the hell should it be ok to smoke meth in there. Labour are making a big error here giving millions to illegal drug takers, spending millions in the health system on them to get off drugs is fine but what do you think the compensation will be spent on !

        • phantom snowflake

           /  September 24, 2018

          Oh dear. Complete comprehension failure. But nice Strawman; nobody said it was “ok to smoke meth”. It’s useless trying to argue with you; I have made my point (quite clearly) and I’ll leave you to it.

        • robertguyton

           /  September 24, 2018

          If you smoke a single tobacco cigarette in one of your rentals, you are “out”?
          Sounds…draconian! How will you decide? By using your olfactory organ? What if…the smell is carried from elsewhere to your rental on someone’s clothes? What if the child of your tenant has a secret smoke, as most young people do sometime in their lives. You sound…unpleasant, David.

          • David

             /  September 24, 2018

            If you want to smoke inside rent somewhere else its a free country. Have you ever tried cleaning after a smoker, probably not, ever been to visit a friend who smokes inside their home its just disgusting.
            Its a simple rule Robert my part is I will provide an immaculate, insulated house with a heat pump and the tenant will keep the house like that.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              Bit tough on the responsible parent who’s child experiments with smoking, as so many do – cast them out into the cold, on the street with you, smokers!

    • Griff.

       /  September 24, 2018

      David goes into full on conservative morel panic mode .
      They have a good handle on how much meth is safe its been used as a prescription drug for decades.
      The health department level was never intended for testing for use it was a level deemed safe for an ex meth lab after decontamination.
      Millions have been wasted in this country because of your type of idiocy.
      A level of 15 microgramms per 100cm2 is now deemed safe.
      There is no reason to test if you just think someone has just been smoking it .
      Only if you have reason to believe the property has been used for a meth lab.
      The issue with meth labs is some chemicals used to make meth are extremely toxic and testing for meth is a good proxie for them.
      If you get a high positive just wash the walls lightly with sugar soap no need to pay tens of thousands for a decontamination company they have been ripping off suckers wholesale.

  14. phantom snowflake

     /  September 24, 2018

    A side issue: Because methamphetamine vapour is completely odourless, and methamphetamine use crosses the boundaries of all our social and socioeconomic groups; pretty much anyone could have had a visitor getting fried in their bathroom/toilet and been completely oblivious!

    • David

       /  September 24, 2018

      Having been in a contaminated house from a regular smoker you havent got a clue what you are talking about. Smells like a bloody chemistry set.

      • phantom snowflake

         /  September 24, 2018

        No. As someone who has smoked methamphetamine I am in a position to know for certain that methamphetamine vapour is odourless. You’re wrong. (again)

        • Griff.

           /  September 24, 2018

          I will back phantom snowflake.
          You can not tell if someone is smoking P a few meters away.
          You do not smell P You can however sometimes taste it.
          Only way you will know the taste is if you have tried it .
          P is expensive @ $60 to $100 a point 0.1 of a gram.
          Its not a drug for the dole bludgers it more a drug of choice for those who earn good money . If you think someone is fried look at their eyes the pupils will be dilated and users often chew their checks ,grind teeth or make repetitive jerky movements. They will be inclined to drink excessively yet alcohol will have little effect. They will not eat much if anything . If you think a co worker has been doing it in the weekends look for erratic mood swings and aggressive behavior .

          • phantom snowflake

             /  September 24, 2018

            Cheers Griff. That’s all true, of course, although there are people who are very good at hiding the ‘signs’. The only giveaways with a previous workmate of mine were the pupils, rapid breathing, and occasional fluttering of eyelids.

          • phantom snowflake

             /  September 24, 2018

            HAHA! Fucken hilarious, looks like I got downvotes for admitting to having smoked meth. I’m loving that Rightie moral outrage!

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              You look at the tick-metre? Here ???

            • phantom snowflake

               /  September 24, 2018

              Yes Robert, and I’m humbled in your presence! My best effort so far is a mere 9 downvotes…

            • robertguyton

               /  September 24, 2018

              Early days, ps.

            • Gezza

               /  September 24, 2018

              I didn’t downtick you but having seen what it did to a niece I’m not impressed snowy.

            • robertguyton

               /  September 25, 2018

              What did down-ticking do to your niece, Gazza?

            • Gezza

               /  September 25, 2018

              I dunno what downticking done to Gazza’s niece but meth smoking got my niece hopelessly addicted and exposed her & her kids to the violent meth smoking drug addicted burglar she had them to – until he eventually got locked up for beating him up. The kids have had a nightmare time growing up – with him turning up in breach of protection orders.

            • Gezza

               /  September 25, 2018

              *beating her up

  15. PDB

     /  September 24, 2018

    Phantom Snowflake: “HAHA! Fucken hilarious, looks like I got downvotes for admitting to having smoked meth.”

    Silly I agree – going by previous posts I would have thought it pretty obvious?

    • phantom snowflake

       /  September 24, 2018

      An uptick for that one! lol

      • PDB

         /  September 24, 2018

        Only joshing 🙂 I presume you’ve stopped – reason?

        • phantom snowflake

           /  September 24, 2018

          Was something I tried (maybe 5 times) just to see what all the fuss was about. It really doesn’t measure up when compared to fullblown mania hehe.

        • PDB

           /  September 24, 2018

          Fair enough. Not something I’d even try to be fair – just doesn’t appeal.

          • phantom snowflake

             /  September 24, 2018

            What I experienced primarily was excitement, energization and enhanced confidence. Yet the experience was somewhat shallow; not intellectually interesting at all.

  16. robertguyton

     /  September 25, 2018

    Mike Sabin’s name keeps coming up…
    “Simon Bridges and Mike Sabin
    I agree with John Minto whom I am quoting below.

    “Instead of denigrating state house tenants Simon Bridges should be calling for an independent inquiry into the meth-testing industry which drove the hysteria about meth contamination.

    … How much of the $100 million wasted went through MethCon?

    … There must be an inquiry into this unregulated, cowboy industry. We need to know how the National government came to waste over $100 million in taxpayer money.””

    • phantom snowflake

       /  September 25, 2018

      Was just about to post this when I saw that

      Simon Bridges’ claim the government is compensating “meth crooks” is vile and despicable.

      His comments continue the cruel, abusive derision directed against so many State tenants and beneficiaries under the National government.Bridges knows the meth testing was bogus. He knows people were thrown out of their homes when there was no evidence when the contamination occurred or who had caused it.

      Bridges and his National colleagues gloated as Paula Bennett put the boot in again and again against beneficiaries and state house tenants on the meth issue.

      We are inviting New Zealanders to condemn Bridges rather than condemn state house tenants caught up in National’s cruel campaign.

      Bridges should be calling for an independent inquiry into the meth-testing industry which drove the hysteria about meth contamination.

      Bridges colleague Mike Sabin, former policeman and former National MP, was at the heart of the moral panic over meth.

      Before he entered Parliament as an MP in 2011, Sabin was a policeman and founded an anti-methamphetamine company called MethCon.

      It was an appropriate name for the company and the campaign Sabin ran in the National Party to drum up hysteria around methamphetamine.

      As a result of Sabin’s campaign and National’s joy in attacking state house tenants and beneficiaries Housing New Zealand wasted over $120 million on meth testing and remediation of contaminated homes.
      https://thedailyblog.co.nz/2018/09/25/simon-bridges-mike-sabin-and-the-national-governments-120-million-taxpayer-rort/

  17. PDB

     /  September 25, 2018

    Not sure if posted elsewhere but interesting counterpoint from someone who has actually read the full HNZ report. As always the truth is somewhere in the middle of the debate;

    “https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/opinion/107321361/why-are-we-frittering-away-big-bucks-on-compensation