NZ First 2018 convention

Stuff: “Just over 200 members were gathered at Tauranga Racecourse for the party’s annual conference.”

So far at least there is not much detail on the NZ First website about the convention they are having this weekend, apart from notices about it.

Convention & AGM 2018 – Tauranga

On behalf of the Board of Directors I would like to invite you all to the 2018 Convention & AGM to be held at the Tauranga Racecourse on the 29th and 30th of September. The Convention and AGM is New Zealand First’s largest gathering and networking event of the year. It will be a pleasure to see you all again as we mark an important milestone in our Party’s history – 25 years.

The Convention weekend will be fun filled and energetic as make the big decisions that will define our party for the next 25 years. Since the last election New Zealand First has had a significant role in shaping the Government of our country and I am proud of the work the Rt Hon Winston Peters, our Ministers and our MPs have been doing.

Make the decision to join the other movers and shakers in our Party and if you have any issues please get in touch with our Convention organising team.

Yours thankfully,

Brent Catchpole

Leader’s Message

On 18 July, New Zealand First celebrates its 25th anniversary. No other new political
New Zealand First was formed to represent the views of New Zealanders concerned
about the economic and social direction of our country after the radical market
reforms of the 1980s and early 1990s. At our founding, we set out 15 Fundamental
Principles which guide us as we negotiate common-sense policy outcomes for the
betterment of our people and our country.

The 25 year milestone is a result of us remaining steadfast in our principles and
enthusiasm for a better New Zealand, whether we are in government, or on the
opposition benches.

Our record precedes us: free health care for our children, a more dignified life for our
elderly, workers receiving a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work, safer communities,
and many other achievements that have impacted lives of everyday New
Zealanders.

Today, our mission in Government is restoring lost capacity after nine years of
National neglect, regenerating regional New Zealand, the lifeblood of the country,
and putting the interests of all New Zealanders at the forefront of government
decision-making.

We could not have embarked on this mission without your support and contributions.
On the 29th and 30th of September, we will be holding our Annual Convention and
AGM in Tauranga. I urge you to join me, and my parliamentary colleagues, as we
celebrate our 25-year anniversary and look toward the future.

There is some coverage from Stuff. NZ First’s 25th birthday bash a chance to push right into the culture wars

Party conventions serve many purposes. The base of diehard supporters – who you need to enthuse so they can volunteer at the next election – have to be kept happy. But there are also a lot of TV cameras and mischievous journalists there – so the party must project itself as sensible, coherent, and able to win over any voters who have faded away since the election.

And while polling of NZ First between elections is notoriously bad, the party does need to win some votes back. Most of the recent public polls put it below the all-important five per cent threshold, and it seems most of the internal polling has it below there too, with the Greens still above the line. You can’t be the kingmaker if you are outside of Parliament, as Peters knows well from his stint in the wilderness after 2008.

Behind all the blustering there is one large question that faces NZ First: who does the party turn to when Peters finally retires? It could happen in a few years, it could happen in ten, but the MPs behind him have been maneuvering like it could happen tomorrow. Shane Jones has his billion dollar fund and high media profile, putting him solidly in the lead. But don’t count out the very charismatic Fletcher Tabuteau, who won the deputy leadership and will deliver a caucus report speech on Sunday morning, ahead of Peter’s speech in the afternoon. Sometimes a little bit of anonymity goes a long way.

NZ First conference takes aim at banks with several remits

NZ First members have voted for several remits aimed at the banking sector, including a $50m levy to keep banks open in small towns.

The remit seeks to levy $50m from the banking sector that was redistributed to banks as a subsidy to keep banks in small towns open and for longer hours.

Other remits aimed at promoting the Government’s use of New Zealand-owned banks, buying back shares of KiwiBank from the Super Fund and ACC were also passed with no opposition.

However, accepted policy remits from the conference have a long road to becoming actual Government policy, including the caucus policy committee of NZ First and Cabinet itself.

NZ Herald:  Boxer Joseph Parker surprise speaker at NZ First’s annual convention

Boxer Joseph Parker was the surprise speaker at New Zealand First’s annual convention in Tauranga today. What probably made it more surprising is that he is the nephew of National MP Judith Collins.

Parker played down any conflict though, saying he supported everyone.

“I feel like my aunty knows where my heart is. It’s just about going about there and saying something that we hope can inspire and motivate others and help others.”

Parker said he had a close relationship with Peters.

There will be more from the NZ First convention today, but I may not have time to post on it.

Leave a comment

40 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  September 30, 2018

    1 ewes at 6 had an item on the scathing criticism the Australian banks have just had from a Royal Commission which has been looking in to the Industry.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-6217649/Greedy-Australian-banks-pilloried-scathing-official-inquiry.html

    The item drew attention to the fact that NZF has consistently accused the Australian-owned banks in NZ of ripping Kiwis off, mentioned that officials here have tended to pretend they behave better in NZ, & that we should possibly expect NZF to make the most of this Royal Commission’s findings to once again question the profits and practices of the Aussie banks in NZ during the leader’s speech today.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  September 30, 2018

      those aussie banks rinse kiwis big time with the most feeble rationale about 2 different markets.Depositors insurance in Oz…OBR haircut for Kiwis.

      Contrary to HFD ‘s assertion that the aussie banks here do not make excessive profits ,the reality is that they absolutely do,just look at their cost of capital.

      Thieves and parasites that suck the energy out of the productive sector.

      Not forgetting the tacit ‘Govt guarantee’ to bail them out when their greed over reaches.

      Reply
  2. NOEL

     /  September 30, 2018

    On average a Royal Commission costs around 82 Million AUD.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-14/bank-royal-commission-how-much-will-misbehaviour-cost-the-banks/10246846

    The real losers will be those with interest only loans and that’s a lot of people in Australia.
    The down stream effect with be interesting to watch.

    Reply
  3. Zedd

     /  September 30, 2018

    NZF has likely survived, because they are the strongest ‘centrist party’; alternative to those seen as Left & Right only.. after demise of U/F etc.

    BUT for MMP to progress further.. we need more parties for viable coalitions (drop threshold to 2% ?); look out folks.. TOP is coming back !

    Reply
  4. Corky

     /  September 30, 2018

    Lordy..pontificating Jonsey was a sight be behold….and hear.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  September 30, 2018

      Did you see that clip of him on 1ewes at 6 last night?

      He was saying something to the conference about the Provincial Growth Fund, along the lines:

      “And it’s not true that the first thing I approved was a roundabout 500 metres from my house. >:D

      It’s a kilometre from my house 😀 “

      Reply
  5. Kitty Catkin

     /  September 30, 2018

    200 people ! This will, I hope, mean less sarcasm from Auntie Winnie about the size of other party’s conferences .

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  September 30, 2018

      Well, the one’s they showed on 1ewes last night were very supportive & they think he’s the best politician in NZ politics and that the country needs Winston Peters.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  September 30, 2018

        200 is not very many people for a party conference.

        He makes snide remarks about the size of other conferences, now it’s his turn.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  September 30, 2018

          I wouldn’t be completely surprised if the crowd extended all the way to the Washington Monument, according to Winston. None of the reporters who interview him ever know what they’re talking about anyway. According to Winston. Can’t see him being fazed by the size of the crowd. Has it ever been any bigger?

          Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  September 30, 2018

        These are the people who brayed at the two whites not making a Wong ‘joke’ as if it wasn’t meaningless nonsense, so they are not very discerning.

        They probably think that this is the 1950s and he is Winston Churchill.

        Reply
    • Zedd

       /  September 30, 2018

      @kitty

      attendance at conferences, is usually delegates from branches/electorates.. not usually related to the number of members or supporters ?!

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  September 30, 2018

        I have been to party conferences which are open to all party members. 200 would be a lot of delegates, as we only have 120 MPs.

        Reply
        • Zedd

           /  September 30, 2018

          sometimes they send more than one delegate per electorate or branch……. 😀

          I once attended a party conference (no party mentioned) & they sent 3 per branch 🙂

          Reply
  6. Gezza

     /  September 30, 2018

    Peters tears at Nats
    NZ First leader Winston Peters delivered a blistering attack on free market economics and National with a major speech on Sunday afternoon, defending his decision to go with Labour.

    Peters was speaking to about 500 people at his party’s 25th annual conference in Tauranga, its first since coming to Government in a coalition with Labour late last year.

    The speech lacked any major policy announcements, instead acting as a clear statement of his party’s history and values and why those values saw him pick Labour.

    This included a direct frontal attack on National and its leader, Simon Bridges, who he said would not last until the next election.
    More… + video
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/107491740/winston-peters-attacks-simon-bridges-and-national-in-conference-speech

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  September 30, 2018

      Winston + baubles = happy man

      Have to agree about Simon, though. Unless he smartens up biggly. Poor strategy and worse execution.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  September 30, 2018

        Winston is losing his composure. If he didn’t care what National was saying or doing he would’ve simply ignored them instead of spending a good chunk of his speech talking about them. Rattled.

        National need to draw a line in the sand and do what they did in 2008 and say they will not go into any possible coalition with NZL First and if that means they miss out on govt then so be it. Winston’s only hope next election (if both major parties remain strong) is that he can continue to pretend he could either go left or right, his votes depend on it unless one of the major parties slump as Labour did in 2011 under Goff.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  September 30, 2018

          My stepfather had a saying about not giving the other fellow free publicity.

          Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  September 30, 2018

          “Winston Peters had harsh words for National, saying the party had become ‘bitter and jealous’.”
          That’s it. It’s all you need to know. I will be reminding the forgetful of Winston’s insightful comment ad nauseam .
          National: ‘bitter and jealous’.”
          Bitter and jealous.

          Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  September 30, 2018

      Beautiful!

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  October 1, 2018

        Not to me, he’s too old, and I’m hetero as. I suppose he might have a certain charm to those who aren’t CIS-gendered.

        Reply
  7. Blazer

     /  September 30, 2018

    ‘baubles’ Winston interoduced this term into the everyday lexicon of language here in NZ.
    Be interested in exactly how baubles are…defined.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  September 30, 2018

      I looked it up at the time – it means worthless trinket. And typically for Winston (words matter) although he was accused of accepting baubles – his portfolios (eg foreign minister) were not worthless trinkets.

      Whenever Winston uses words, it always pays to check the dictionary – he’s a master of ambiguity.

      Reply
  8. Kitty Catkin

     /  September 30, 2018

    The two candidates did the party no favours, droning whingers both who were parroting Auntie Winnie in a mindless way, especially the second one who was a very poor speaker.They didn’t look the part, either, they gave the appearance of having come from the garden and not changed clothes. Neither of them would make me want to vote for them or the party.

    Reply
  9. robertguyton

     /  September 30, 2018

    Lordy! You guys are …screwed…
    ““National’s behaviour since the election has only confirmed our good sense in choosing Labour. National is leaderless, moribund, and vacuous. It’s a shell of its former self because it’s been seduced by marketing. Substance will always trump shallowness so remember this, Simon Bridges will not lead National into the next election.

    “He is a desperate man,” Mr Peters said.”

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  September 30, 2018

      Why? We don’t take Winston seriously. It’s those who do that get screwed.

      Reply

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