Media watch – Saturday

13 October 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

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52 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  October 13, 2018


    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?
    HERALD: staff writer
    12 Oct 2018
    It was a head-scratching afternoon at the White House as rapper Kanye West and so many of his opinions descended on the Oval Office to discuss a range of topics, including North Korea and bipolar disorder, with his “brother” President Trump.
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=12141090
    . . . . . . . . . .
    HERALD: Lizzie Marvelly
    13 Oct, 2018

    Celebrity political endorsements are becoming increasingly common, and I tentatively welcome such a phenomenon. The louder the conversation around participation in the democratic process, the more normalised voting behaviour becomes.

    Reply
    • David

       /  October 13, 2018

      Its been interesting watching the coverage in contrast to the endless line of celebrities going in and out of the Obama White House none of whom were called mental, token negro, minstral show and generally hammered.
      JayZ was a regular and the media thought it was cool and if anything Kanye is just a little bit better as a human, just.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  October 13, 2018

      It’s not often President Trumpy is lost for words…unsure of what to do,..and upstaged. He is, and remains, the best entertainment in town.

      As for Kanye West… I’m sorry bro…bro Donny wont be able to save you from bros on the street..

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  October 13, 2018

        Kanye West is an opinionated boor. He doesn’t even have the grace to take off his hat inside.

        Remember when he grabbed the mike at (the Emmys?) and ruined someone’s award by ranting on that someone else should have had it?

        He’s a rude, conceited egomaniac who’s totally enamoured of the sound of his own voice; or that’s how he comes across.

        Reply
  2. David

     /  October 13, 2018

    Another Saturday another ra ra piece from Arderns biggest fan Tracy Watkins who as a “hardened” political journalist manages to praise Ardern for using strong language aimed at the fuel companies as if that is something new but fails to point out that once again Ardern misled the public. She quoted figures in her attempt to pin the rise on the fuel companies by using data that conveniently didnt include her latest excise tax rise and when after 4 days someone bothered to do the maths Ardern hid behind using “MBIE figures” but ones that were 2 weeks old.
    A pattern of behaviour that she should stop, just front it and claim the tax rise is for projects that she campaigned on.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/107801609/making-government-look-hard

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  October 13, 2018

      Didn’t you like this bit at the end?

      “It might have been a knee jerk reaction. But there was more than a touch of John Key or Helen Clark about her playing the blame game. No politician ever lost votes putting the boot into petrol companies.

      And the Government’s perception problem was only going to get bigger when the Crown accounts were published the next day revealing a $5.5 billion surplus.

      With a surplus that big, motorists aren’t interested in hearing all the fiscal ins and outs of why the two – petrol taxes and surpluses – are unrelated. Especially when coupled with the fact that the Government collected a staggering $1.9 billion in fuel excise last year.

      But while it was politically expedient for Ardern to talk tough on petrol prices, it also highlights the size of the headache ahead.There is actually nothing desirable about lower petrol prices in terms of this Government’s climate change policies. The opposite is in fact true – that if we want to decrease our reliance on fossil fuels, petrol prices will need to go up – and taxes will be a part of the mix to achieve that.

      But Ardern on Monday opted for the political expediency of kicking that can down the road.”
      . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
      I realised this morning, with a weeny bit of surprise, that I already actually trust Jacinda Ardern to be telling the truth less than I trusted John Key.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  October 13, 2018

        I trusted Key to actually know what the truth is – unlike Ardern.

        Reply
      • David

         /  October 13, 2018

        I think we all had higher expectations of Ardern, she has perfected that disarming earnestness, and if she did what Key did in his first term and just looked down the camera and told the truth she would be fine.
        One shouldnt forget she has spent all of her life immersed in the dark arts of political spin.

        Reply
        • Patzcuaro

           /  October 13, 2018

          Did someone mention Jason Ede?

          Reply
          • David

             /  October 13, 2018

            Dont think so, must have missed his premiership.

            Reply
          • duperez

             /  October 13, 2018

            If she did what Key did, just look down the camera and tell the truth she’d be fine. I can imagine her getting away with telling us that GCSB is actually spelled GBSC. 🙃

            Reply
  3. NOEL

     /  October 13, 2018

    New type of Teflon. For Keys the mantra was be vague. For Arden deflect.

    Reply
  4. Patzcuaro

     /  October 13, 2018

    Reality

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  October 13, 2018

      Only Emmerson could manage to make Princess Eugenie look like the Saudi Foreign Minister.

      Reply
  5. Patzcuaro

     /  October 13, 2018

    Bare skin

    Reply
  6. Blazer

     /  October 13, 2018

    Reply
  7. Reply
    • Corky

       /  October 13, 2018

      ”The Donald” went one better than “The Gipper”. Ronald Reagan was only a B-grade movie star, Trump is a billionaire. In his person the broken white American working-class glimpsed the possibility of recovery. Not simply because they judged his promise to run America the way he ran his business empire as unlikely to produce a worse result than the nightmare in which they were currently enmeshed, but because Trump held out the additional promise of telling their supposed “friends” in the Democratic Party, the despised liberal elites: “You’re fired.”

      Liberal elites? More like liberals in general. Liberals have little time for their disabled tribal members. They are used as a political meal ticket and not much else.

      Jacinda should take this lesson to heart.. her heartland is starting to hurt. Watch out!

      Reply
  8. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2018

    Remember the stouche over the Otago Settlers Musem. Christchurch now has a new library. The name “Turanga” was “gifted” – nothing to see.

    Today’s grand opening of Tūranga shows what can be achieved when local iwi play a lead role in city design.

    Ngāi Tūāhuriri – the local Ngāi Tahu hapū that is mana whenua for the city – heavily influenced the design and build of Tūranga. This was led by Matapopore Charitable Trust cultural advisors alongside Christchurch City Council and resulted in a library experience that clearly reflects Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Ngāi Tahu values.

    “The stories of Ngāi Tahu and Ngāi Tūāhuriri are expertly woven into Ōtautahi’s new central library, and this is something we should all be proud of,” said Lynne Te Aika, trustee of the Matapopore Charitable Trust (and Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu General Manager, Te Taumatua)…..

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1810/S00290/cultural-treasu
    re-unveiled-in-central-otautahi.htm

    Nothing to see.

    As I have pointed out there were fewer than 500 Maori in Canterbury at Colonization and the city is entirely the results of that colonisation.

    Labour has embarked us on the path to “decolonisation” and yet the media looks the other way.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  October 13, 2018

      It’s good for tourism …

      Reply
      • sorethumb

         /  October 13, 2018

        How is it good for tourism? Christchurch is not a Maori story?

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  October 13, 2018

          here is the Maori story of Christchurch
          https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/landmarks-main-trunkline-1981

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  October 13, 2018

            Aotearoa New Zealand is a bicultural (and multicultural) story … hapu/iwi Maori are one of the two central protagonists in our story …

            1981 eh? The very end of the Right Brigade’s magic, delusional era of New Zeal Land homogeneity and an assimilated “one people” … Pakeha …

            Wow … and folks here accuse me of wanting to return to the halcyon days of ‘socialism’.

            Reply
            • sorethumb

               /  October 13, 2018

              If your story is so secure why did Southern & Molyneux create such a stir?

            • PartisanZ

               /  October 13, 2018

              Firstly, they didn’t create a stir with me … which, according to Alan’s formula of personal ‘me’ projection onto the whole of society might mean they didn’t create a stir much at all …

              What’s happened about the Free Speech Coalition’s court proceedings anyhow?

              Secondly, the stir Southern & Molyneux did create was 1) Whipped to a frenzy by the media and 2) mostly among groups of people who are concerned – understandably IMHO – about the ‘fragility’ or resilience of gains in both the legal status and perception-recognition they have won for women, Maori and minorities …

              If you’re incapable of even seeing, let alone acknowledging their point-of-view then you won’t see the similarities between their fight and yours …

        • Corky

           /  October 13, 2018

          Christchurch is not a Maori city apart from a few ferals. Western values should be the taonga on display here. But it’s that colonisation thing. Its so unfashionable.

          Reply
          • Ray

             /  October 13, 2018

            Sorry Corky, got to call you on that.
            Kāi Tahau are the really big money end of town now
            Eat it up honky.

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  October 13, 2018

              I’m not too familiar with Christchurch… explain a little more, lickspittle.

          • PartisanZ

             /  October 13, 2018

            @Corky – “But it’s that colonisation thing. Its so unfashionable.”

            Yeah … Well … a lot of things that are so last millenium are also unfashionable now …

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  October 13, 2018

              Does that include Maori violence and the new tribalism called gangs?
              Or do we blame that on colonisation as well?

    • sorethumb

       /  October 13, 2018

      So what is decolonisation and who decides? Do people not have a right to feel proud of their heritage?

      As a moral background it sets out to propose, that of all the possible understandings of our history, the best is one which begins with the colonisation by the British of another people’s land. Further, the most morally valuable events since then have been those of Maori resistance to Crown sovereignty in the name of tino rangatiratanga, together with those recent events (both in practical politics and in people’s minds) which are able to be expressed as part of a history of continued de-colonisation, the tide of which continues to rise, and which the reader is urged both to recognise and to swim with. All other events and thoughts tend to be dismissed as self-seeking, obtuse and insensitive. Such a background is asserted rather than defended; and it is probable it cannot be defended in the authors’ own terms, which are perspectival and relativist, and ill-equipped to deal with truth claims.
      Against this background, the authors’ more precise prescription is that Aotearoa/New Zealand, should-recognising (and ’recalling’) the facts of past and present-remodel itself as both a bicultural and a multicultural society. It should also re-constitute itself as a bi-national polity in which Maori, as the indigenous nation of the land, become true partners with Pakeha ’at the level of official languages, national images and symbols, prevailing agendas, and institutional frameworks’. Such a partnership should not, though, detract from ’multiculturalism in providing due recognition of ethnicity in New Zealand’. The process of change, the authors warn, will not be easy because of ’resistance from vested interests and established agendas’; and a state of ’uncertainty and expediency is likely to persist until such time as conventional thinking accepts ’recalling’ partnership between two consenting peoples, both of whom are sovereign in their own right, yet inextricably interlocked as partners in jointly exploring post-sovereign possibilities’. The book is, in post-modern parlance, an ’intervention’ in the cultural politics of our country.”

      http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/003231870005200114

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  October 13, 2018

        Of course people have a right to feel proud of their heritage … I am immensely proud of my English, Border Scots, Jewish and possibly American heritage …

        People also have an obligation to ascertain the facts and, frankly, understand the feelings, of any other peoples they share their heritage with …

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  October 13, 2018

          Exactly but why should the Christchurch Library honour the local iwi over the people who built the city and why should te reo be in large bold letters with translations underneath?

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  October 13, 2018

            A) The library stands on present or former iwi whenua and the library doesn’t honour the iwi “over” the people who built the city … The library honours iwi “along with” those people … as well as … in partnership with … in ongoing relationship with …

            B) Why shouldn’t Te Reo be in large bold letters? You can still read the English can’t you?

            You can’t accept that in the process of redress there might be a little healthy imbalance, can you? A tiny and mostly symbolic sprinkling of compassionate forbearance … a little extra offer in the negotiations on reconciliation … in which the Crown, at 1 – 13 cents in the dollar value, are getting a mighty good deal on financially …

            Your whole Right Brigade ‘tribe’ are incapable of seeing and understanding this simple concept and its associated actions …

            Books are written and sold to one another, websites duplicated, frequented and ranted upon, lobby groups like NZCPR get columns in newspapers and fanatical old white men bombard letters-to-the-editor on a weekly basis … producing blizzards of ‘cloned submissions’ to any government department or NGO investigation, panel or legislative initiative which threatens their ‘resistance’ to “a little healthy [and mostly only seeming] imbalance” …

            You people defy belief IMHO …

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  October 13, 2018

              Seems to me you are have a brainstorm, Parti. Here’s the thing. You will find little on the Marae honouring European culture. Is it too much to ask that the Christchurch rebuild not waste money on Maori culture no one gives a stuff about…not even the tourists, who will get better in other parts of the country?

            • PartisanZ

               /  October 13, 2018

              I’ve been on plenty of marae Corky … All of them I can recall where the buildings are built to European specs and regulations, however they may be decorated … where Pakeha-technology framed photographs and pictures of tupuna hang on the walls … where the Whare Kai is full of European furniture, crockery and utensils and te kīhini full of European fixtures and appliances … and where te korero is bilingual … welcoming … and friendly … even in disagreement …

              Show me some evidence that no-one gives a stuff about Maori culture … or biculturalism …

              I care about it … and I believe that New Zealanders who care about it are now in the majority … possibly a substantial majority …

            • Corky

               /  October 13, 2018

              No, Parti, you are talking of things..not culture. And, nobody forced these things on Maori. Imagine if a European wanted a say on how a Marae should be constructed?

              ”Show me some evidence that no-one gives a stuff about Maori culture … or biculturalism …”

              I was talking about Maori culture mainly in Christchurch.

              But now that you ask

              1- Maori TV…few Maori watch. It has a strong European following. Why do you think that is Parti? My guess is it’s quality television that needs an intellect to enjoy. Maoridom is more interested in rap, money and sport.

              2- The language…it’s dying..because Maori soon lose interest in learning .

              3- Maori in jail.

              4- Myself, and a quiet majority up and down the country. Don Brash proved that.

              I have repeated this many times. I will do so again:

              TAKE THE GOVERNMENT FUNDING OUT OF MAORI INITIATIVES AND MAORI CULTURE IS DEAD OVERNIGHT.

            • sorethumb

               /  October 13, 2018

              A. The Iwi sold it’s land in 1848. The library has allowed Iwi to dominate by naming art and building design plus te reo dominates English.

              B. Not worth the effort.

              C.The rest is just blather.

            • PartisanZ

               /  October 13, 2018

              Corky, a “quiet majority” is a contradiction in terms. How do we know they’re a majority if they stay quiet?

              “TAKE THE GOVERNMENT FUNDING OUT OF MAORI INITIATIVES AND MAORI CULTURE IS DEAD OVERNIGHT.”

              No need to shout … eh Gezza?

              So … Is that how Maori initiatives got going in the first place, before there was any government funding?

            • Gezza

               /  October 13, 2018

              Personally I think gangs are an issue, Treaty Settlements are issues, some of the Waitangi Tribunal’s more arguable rulings might be an issue from time to time, the degree to which expectations of Maori on governance over the whole population can realistically met might be an issue (although people who think they’re effectively running things now have lost the plot) and the resurgence of pride in Maori culture and Maori language are not really that big an issue and in very many respects good to see.

  9. PartisanZ

     /  October 13, 2018

    “Whatever the x-factor is that propels politicians like John Key and Jacinda Ardern to the top job, Little did not have it. But, at the same time, I was among many critics who greatly underappreciated Little’s talents as a politician — and, more importantly, his character as a man.

    Little’s record in his brief tenure as Minister for Justice and Courts and Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations has been one of frenetic activity and considerable accomplishment.”

    ‘Why I was wrong about Andrew Little’ – Shane Te Pou – Newsroom

    https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/10/08/268752/why-i-was-wrong-about-andrew-little

    Reply

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