The deep south?

Maybe some people up north see everything south of Wellington as ‘the deep south’, but when Otago is referred to as the deep south it bemuses me.

Stuff: Otago’s defence stands tall in successful Ranfurly Shield raid against Waikato

The Ranfurly Shield is heading to the deep south for the summer as Otago matched their successful 2013 raid in Hamilton by holding on for an enthralling 23-19 win against Waikato in the Mitre 10 Cup.

It seems similar to including Auckland in ‘the far north’. Otago to me is just Otago.

If there is a ‘deep south’ then surely it is Southland. Or Fiordland.

ODT:  NZ’s most remote place is in the deep south

Where do you go in New Zealand to be farthest away from civilisation?

Hamish Campbell, a software engineer who works at Koordinates in Auckland, said he used a range of open-source data tools to pinpoint the place which was farthest from any structure, including far-flung conservation huts.

He started by using a Land Information NZ map which showed the location of every building in the country – 653,358 in total.

That quickly narrowed his search to Fiordland, on the south-western edge of the South Island.

After a bit of digital wizardry, he found what he believed to be New Zealand’s most remote spot. It is the south end of a bay which the Coal River empties into, and is south of Doubtful Sound.

Fiordland is certainly the most inaccessible region in mainland New Zealand, except by boat or by helicopter.

But parts of Otago are further south than the bottom of Fiordland, and further south than Invercargill, and further south than Bluff.

File:Position of Otago.png

 

That shows Otago stretching almost as far south as the southernmost point of the South island, Slope Point (incidentally the southern Catlins is a great area to visit).

It also shows that Lumsden is north of Dunedin! And Kaka Point is about as far south as Riverton, and Milton is as about far south as Gore, and Tuatapere is north of Balclutha.

Quite a lot of Otago is north of parts of Canterbury. Lakes Wanaka and Hawea are completely north of parts of South Canterbury. Makarora is actually north of Timaru (about the same latitude as Temuka).

But to me Otago generally is not the far south. That’s Southland. We are just south-ish.

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26 Comments

  1. robertguyton

     /  October 14, 2018

    Otago! Call that South?!? Geddaway! Tropical! Hurricane country. Pineapples and bananas! Practically on the world’s waistline! South! I’ll give you SOUTH !
    (I spent time on a small island south of Stewart Island a few years ago but others have been souther than that!)

    Reply
    • I didn’t include overseas. I referred to mainland South Island, excluding souther islands.

      Reply
    • I must confess I have family connections with the deep south.

      A grandfather was born in Invercargill, grandfather eventually settled in Bluff where he was secretary of the harbour board for several decades. He was even on the Southland Rugby board, but that was when they could win.

      My mother lived in Monowai in the 40s, and married a Fortrose farmer and lived there in the 80s (they moved to Otago after that).

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 14, 2018

        Good Lord, Pete – you’re part stag!

        Reply
        • No no no no! Blue and gold through and through. I’m aware of some more southern ancestral connections, not quite as remote as my English and Welsh ancient history.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  October 14, 2018

            Your Stag roots cannot be denied! (That’s a common expression down here, Pete; you’ll hear it often enough in any Southern pub).

            Reply
            • Southland is far better known for it’s oysters than it’s deer. And proof that I’m not a dredger (some relatives were), I really dislike oysters. When I was a kid living in deepest rural Central Otago we were sent sacks of oysters in season, and sent boxes of apples in return. I was and remain loyal to my fruit tree roots, I love apples and hate oysters. I don’t eat stag either, I’m not into gamey tastes.

            • I will just whisper this very quietly – my first New Zealand ancestors were from Canterbury (my Southland grandfather’s grandmother).

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  October 14, 2018

              A closet Crusader fan then, PG?

            • Nope. That part of my family past is merely a historical curiosity, as is Turvey, Liverpool and Caernarfon.

  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  October 14, 2018

    It is an enduring mystery to me, Robert, why the Scots would travel halfway around the world and then settle in Invercargill. Seems like some kind of genetic masochism. I have spent my adult life migrating northward. Probably why I like global warming.

    Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  October 14, 2018

      Thought you didn’t believe in global warming and now that we find you do, it’s disturbing to learn that you like it. My “folk” are from Shetland and Orkney, consequently, they travelled even further south, to Stewart Island and beyond, the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands even, to take advantage of the skills they had developed over the generations, for surviving in hostile environments, feeding their livestock and themselves kelp, bring peat to keep warm (on McQuarry Island, the residents there burned massive chunks of elephant seal blubber to warm their hovels – hard men, those, no namby-pamby Jaffas they).

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 14, 2018

        “Burning” peat. Peat, of course, being a common but not popular Christian name for boys born into Tory families on the islands.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  October 14, 2018

        Bonkers Scots as I thought, Robert.

        As a one-time scientist, I believe thermometers but not so much models. So no problem with global warming, just sceptical of climate alarmism. What cannot be proved is just speculation and must be scrutinised accordingly.

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  October 14, 2018

          Better than being a two-timing scientist, I suppose. Believing inanimate objects doesn’t sound very scientific though – do you also believe pipettes and Bunsen burners?

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  October 14, 2018

            Science depends on reproducible facts that can be independently confirmed and on the testing of those facts. You should know that.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  October 14, 2018

              I read an article about the ‘deep South’ and they interviewed a Somali man who now lives there. He loves the place, the people and his life there, but the climate was a bit of a surprise.

  3. Gezza

     /  October 14, 2018

    My general understanding of deep south is basically anywhere south of Akaroa.

    Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  October 14, 2018

      And the Far North – anything above Akaroa?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  October 14, 2018

        Nope. Anything from Whagarei and further north 😀 .

        I should clarify – deep south just gets deeper the further south you go from Akaroa. Actually I’m joking. I generally think of Otago & Southland as “deep south”. My turangawaewae’s New Plymouth, Taranaki and I live in Welly. South starts across Cook Straight for me. I ain’t never living anywhere where water freezes in the pipes.

        Reply
      • duperez

         /  October 14, 2018

        When you live in the middle of Northland and hear of some incident in the area described by a Wellington newsreader as being in the “far North” you get that Pete George ‘deep south’ feeling.

        Reply
  4. artcroft

     /  October 14, 2018

    My first nz ancestor arrived at the Catlins by jumping ship in the 1860’s. All his kids were terrified of him and fled, when old enough, to the North Is to escape. We’ve been here ever since.

    Reply
    • Have you visited the Catlins? It was very remote and isolated, especially in the early days, but since they sealed the road right through (I think in the 1990s) it has become a popular but usually not too busy, with plenty of interesting things to see all the way down from Kaka Point to Curio Bay. Slope Point is rather sparse and some will find that a disappointment but I quite like it.

      Reply
      • artcroft

         /  October 14, 2018

        It’s on my bucket list and I will certainly make it there some day. Just have persuade my wife that while there aren’t many malls in the Catlins, it’s worth seeing.

        Reply

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