Turkey challenges latest Saudi Arabia attempt to explain Khashoggi murder

As promised yesterday Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has a different story to Saudi Arabia on the murder of Jamal Khashoggi.

BBC:  Khashoggi murder planned days ahead, says Turkey’s Erdogan

The killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi was planned days in advance, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has told MPs from his ruling party.

He said Turkey had strong evidence Khashoggi was killed in a premeditated and “savage” murder at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 October.

He also called for the suspects to be tried in Istanbul.

He demanded Saudi Arabia provide answers about where Khashoggi’s body was, and who had ordered the operation.

The Saudi kingdom has provided conflicting accounts of what happened to Khashoggi, a US resident and Washington Post contributor. After weeks of maintaining he was still alive, the authorities now say the 59-year-old was killed in a rogue operation.

A rogue operation by a rogue state provided with weaponry by the US in particular but also by Britan and France and other countries.

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23 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  October 24, 2018

    Reports that the Turks have now found body parts and heavily disfigured face.

    Reply
    • Reply
    • Gezza

       /  October 24, 2018

      God you’re lazy, Sir Alan. No links? No sources cited. Leaving it up to others? Very disappointing.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  October 24, 2018

        I cruised the media first before coming here so by the time I realised PG hadn’t noted it I had forgotten where I read it – and I knew all the media would soon be covering it anyway. As it is, PG’s link has more info than I had seen.

        So I am as always, yours truly unapologetic.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  October 24, 2018

          Thank you, Sir Alan

          Much appreciated.

          I of course reject your hopelessly sad explanation, and accept your pathetic unapology in the spirit in which it was proffered.

          🐧 Sir Gerald 🐧

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  October 24, 2018

            Excellent. May your eels wriggle as adeptly as you, Sir Gerald.

            Reply
  2. Blazer

     /  October 24, 2018

    Reply
  3. Missy

     /  October 24, 2018

    I have some very mixed thoughts about this incident.

    It is horrific what Saudi Arabia did to this man, and they have been rightly condemned, but no-one seems to find it concerning that Turkey appears to have bugged a diplomatic mission.

    If Turkey have bugged the Saudi Consulate, then in this instance it has been a good thing in bringing this horrific crime to light, however, we need to be concerned that if the Turks have bugged this mission, what other diplomatic missions in Turkey have also been bugged. This potentially lays bare a spying operation on a very large scale, and I am concerned that could be brushed under the carpet in the rush to condemn Saudi Arabia. Remember, Turkey don’t have the best record at dealing with dissidents either.

    The way this has been exposed has some potentially long reaching consequences in terms of diplomatic relations with Turkey.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  October 24, 2018

      no-one seems to find it concerning that Turkey appears to have bugged a diplomatic mission

      I think there are many ways of effectively bugging consulates and embassies and there would be a lot more countries doing it than is known or admitted. Weren’t the CIA or the NSA even pinged for listening in on Merkel, an ally?

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  October 24, 2018

        I do realise that many countries are spying (or rather trying to spy) on diplomatic missions, but usually most countries do it via human intelligence and the use of local staff, electronic spying is considered a dangerous breach, and that no-one is commenting on this apparent breach in security should be of concern – aren’t you concerned that they are likely doing it to NZ’s diplomatic missions in Turkey?

        The listening in on Merkel is a different situation, it wasn’t done at a diplomatic mission, if I remember correctly it was done when she was at the UN HQ in the US. It is certainly considered bad manners to be spying on an ally, but it isn’t a breach of diplomatic protocol if the bugging occurs in a public space and outside the diplomatic mission.

        It isn’t the spying I have an issue with, it is that Turkey were doing it in a diplomatic mission. If they were spying on the diplomats and they committed a crime outside the Consulate I wouldn’t care about how they got the information, but that they have audio and images seemingly from inside the mission could be a problem if they are the ones that put the bugs there. Of course it is a different matter – and one for the Saudis to deal with – if they had an agent inside the Saudi Consulate. But I think the questions have to be asked.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  October 24, 2018

          …that no-one is commenting on this apparent breach in security should be of concern…

          Exactly. Have you wondered why no-one is commenting on it? I have. I have reached the conclusion that they dare not.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  October 24, 2018

            It has been my understanding for years Missy that all consulates and embassies are routinely and regularly swept for bugs. I believe the practice of bugging these to be standard for many countries including some Western countries.

            Reply
    • NOEL

       /  October 24, 2018

      Aw get real Missy dont be so prissy. Uk and US haven’t attempted bugging. ROFL.

      Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  October 24, 2018

    This situation is nearly always item one on Aljazeera tv and online print news, and they were suggesting that while he was hinting at finally releasing the audio evidence that proves the Turks’ case Erdogan was likely going to spin this out for longer.

    It has been commented on there constantly that Erdogan was at pains to state that he does not doubt the sincerity of the guardian of the two holy cities (King Salman) to the extent that he even used this honorific in Arabic as he paid deference to the sod, and that he is signalling to the King that he must do something about removing or controlling his evil son, the crown prince.

    That he is demanding the trial of those arrested be in Turkey and that they be extradited there (good luck with that one – the Saudis will obviously prefer their citizens be subject to their justice system, as the Americans must surely now support?)

    Erdogan is making it clear it is not acceptable to Turkey for MBS, without doubt the architect or authoriser of this murder, to be made responsible for overhauling the Saudi Security Services and that he wants him removed from power. As he should be.

    Reply
    • NOEL

       /  October 24, 2018

      From the start had a sense that Turkey was pulling punches by drip feeding evidence.
      http://www.arabnews.com/node/1392086/middle-east

      The world should have responded sooner to get a UN demand that Saudia Arabia ceed diplomatic immunity so the Turkish Police could get on with their job.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  October 24, 2018

        Fucking awkward for the US’s UN Ambassador, State Department, National Security Advisor, Secretary of State, Jared, Trumpy and their equivalents in the West.

        As for the rest of the world, a number of countries would be wondering what the fuss is all about (like MBS was) because they do shit a bit like this anyway and nobody does anything much about it – while others need or have Saudi money & need oil to keep flowing from the ME at current prices or lower.

        I think even NZ has been pretty low-key in its response.

        Reply
  5. Patzcuaro

     /  October 24, 2018

    This isn’t particularly intelligent.

    “The journalist’s remains were found in the garden of the Consul General’s home in Istanbul, Sky News reported, citing legal and political sources”

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=12147578

    Reply
  6. Patzcuaro

     /  October 24, 2018

    Jamal Khashoggi is quite well connected, his uncle was Adnan Khashoggi a colourful Saudi based billionaire arms dealer in the 70s and 80s. His aunt was married to Mohamed Fayed briefly in the 50s and their son Dodi Fayed was his cousin.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  October 24, 2018

      not just an oggi from muskoggi …then.
      Uncle could spend money like water,and had some beautiful women…his bald,rotund appearance no doubt ….radiated animal magnetism.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  October 24, 2018

        Pots of money has always been a strikingly attractive masculine feature for some types of beautiful women.

        Reply
  7. Blazer

     /  October 24, 2018

    Reply
  8. Blazer

     /  October 24, 2018

    Reply

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