After a year how transformative has the Labour-led Government been?

Not much, yet.

The Labour-NZ First-Green government is now a year old. Thomas Coughlan at Newsroom asks whether the current Government is truly a government of change – One year on: Change worthy of its name?

Transformation is a word we hear a lot to describe this Government.

The Government’s speech from the throne promised a “government of transformation”, and followed that up in May with a Budget that Finance Minister Grant Robertson said was “the first steps in a plan for transformation”.

The second word we hear a lot is “transition”.

What they mean to say is “government of change”, which was Ardern’s wording in what became known as her reset speech, which she made in September.

All governments change things, and the world changes. The pertinent question here is whether Ardern and her government are living up to her hype.

The Government has finished just 18 KiwiBuild homes (although it has started construction on more), the waitlist for social housing has grown, and the $2.8 billion investment in fees-free tertiary education hasn’t changed enrolment numbers, although the University of Auckland has tumbled down global league tables.

As for climate change, apparently our “nuclear-free moment”, under the current Government, big dairy can still dial up a a $600 million M. Bovis bailout for a self-inflicted crisis, while the much-lauded Green Investment Fund gets just $100 million.

Nuclear-free moment? Pardon me, but I think I can smell the methane on your breath …

The problem for this Government is that it knows what change looks like and it’s afraid.

It knows that true change is ugly and real people get hurt.

People living under the big-change governments of the 1980s knew they were living in a time of massive change.

So, can Ardern be kind and transformative at the same time?

One year on, we’ve seen this Government’s definition of change.

With the exception of KiwiBuild, its flagship change policies signal change in direction without enacting specific policy.

Supporters say this means the change will be more lasting – and they’re probably right. Both the Child Poverty Reduction Bill and the Zero Carbon Bill have bipartisan support, meaning they will likely survive into the future. Likewise, the Wellbeing Framework has the potential to change how we look at the economy, although proof of that is many years away.

But, especially on the issue of climate change, its slowly-softly policy platform absolves the current Government from making any of the tough decisions necessary when implementing change.

It’s an unpalatable truth that change means picking losers as much as picking winners.

The question hanging over the Government now is whether there is time to implement what it calls a “just transition”, to a halcyon economy of low unemployment, high productivity, and fair incomes.

“Just transition” is essentially the oil and gas exploration ban writ large — big change, but slowly. But a just transition doesn’t need to be slow and there’s nothing just about waiting 30 years for house prices to stabilise.

Just transitions could mean using the power of the welfare state to cushion the pain of change, like the governments of the 1980s should have done.

There’s little room to be complacent. The window of opportunity is closing.

Change is the sword of Damocles hanging over all our governments. And while this Government thinks the lesson from the 1980s is that slow change is best, it would be wise to pay attention to the other lesson from that decade: governments are not the only agents of change and those who fail to act in time will often find their hand forced by events.

Governments are always forced by events to act. They need to manage forced change along with reforming or transformative change, if they can.

In their first year the Government has changed some things, but they have only talked about most changes they propose, and it’s still not clear what they are going to change this term as they await the outcome of their many working groups/inquiries etc.

Also from Newsroom – One year in: the fault lines ahead

The first anniversary has provided a chance for Ardern and her team to look back on their successes and failures so far – but what challenges lay in wait for them before the next election?

Here are some of the fault lines the Government may need to navigate if it is to hold onto power in 2020:

Waterfall of working groups

National’s gleeful mockery of the coalition’s working group fixation seemed a little insincere at the start, given the party was not averse to the odd policy review and panel during its first term.

However, there is a kernel of truth in that the Government is now waiting on the results of numerous inquiries into some critical policy areas, some of which will not report back until just before the next election, until it takes action.

As the reports and recommendations trickle in, the potential bill for implementing all that is asked for will slowly mount up.

Justice reform:

The Government’s plans to shake up the criminal justice system loom as perhaps its highest-risk, highest-reward reforms.

If Justice Minister Andrew Little and Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis succeed, the prison population will be reduced by 30 percent within a decade, addressing what Bill English once called the “moral and fiscal failure” of prisons.

However, National’s cries of the coalition being “soft on crime” provide a taste of its likely campaign against any firm proposals for reform, as well as the outcry which may result from any crimes following law changes (no matter their merit on balance).

Tax reform:

Part of that proliferation of working groups, but worthy of mention in its own right, is the Government’s Tax Working Group – a political slow-burner that could divide the coalition right up to the next election.

Chaired by former finance minister Michael Cullen, it will present its final report on the future of New Zealand’s tax system next February.

However, the Government has committed to putting any recommendations from the group to the electorate in 2020, meaning any changes would not be implemented until at least April 2021.

The sticking point is the issue of a capital gains tax.

So at best this will be a plan for transformation put to voters at the next election.

Climate change

It’s one thing to call climate change the nuclear moment of our generation, it’s another to do something about it.

Climate Change Minister, and Green co-leader, James Shaw said the IPCC report was broadly in line with the Government’s direction on climate change. But talk, as they say, is cheap.

There have been some climate-related policy changes, including a ban on new oil and gas permits and the establishment of a $100 million green investment fund. Also in the wings are a Zero Carbon Bill, emissions trading scheme changes and the creation of a Climate Change Commission.

The biggest pressure on the Government is its own rhetoric. Those disappointed by the environmental record of Helen Clark’s Labour-led coalition will be looking to the Green Party to push the Government into taking stronger, tangible steps.

Ardern has talked big on climate change, but we are yet to see how her Government will transform things.

Also, not mentioned in the Newsroom article, is another issue that Ardern has staked her reputation on, child poverty. Her Government quickly increased some benefits, but there has not been much sign of a revolution on poverty yet.

The Government has another two years to prove to voters that they are capable of walking the walk and delivering meaningful transformation at the same time as they competently manage normal management and also dealing with things that are thrown at them.

Greens also have a lot at stake – they have talked about a green revolution for long enough. They have to deliver something significant to justify voters’ trust in them.

NZ First probably just need to deliver Winston Peters to the voting papers for the party to survive.

As a whole the Government has been far more talk (and working group) than walk.  They may end up sprinting to the next election hoping voters will pass them the baton for another term.

Leave a comment

86 Comments

  1. Patience, Pete. It’s coming…

    Reply
    • So’s Christmas. I don’;t expect to see much transformation by then. But there will need to be tangible signs of significant, sensible and sustainable change by Christmas next year. I’ll believe it when I see it.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 29, 2018

        Christmas! Yes, Pete, the achievements of Labour/Green/NZ1st Government will be like Christmas: here soon and a wonderful experience for everyone, full of good cheer and happiness; kindness to, as Jacinda has promised! You were right to use Christmas as an analogy, Pete!

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  October 29, 2018

          Please don’t take this the wrong way, robert, but looking at your silly replies on this thread, including to me below, I can see why you said some other blogs have eventually given you the elbow.

          Reply
    • David

       /  October 29, 2018

      No its not Robert, if they were going to make any big changes they would have done it by now. The only time Ardern gets any criticism is when she does anything or makes a captains call so expect less and less and more watered down.
      Her lying about the regional fuel tax last week was very telling, she is a people pleaser rather than someone who will say move us away from fossil fuel dependency.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 29, 2018

        Stopping oil and gas exploration was a “people pleaser” – please, David!

        Reply
        • David

           /  October 29, 2018

          Yup she went out and off the cuff pleased the crowd of hippies who had assembled, she wont do that again because it displeased nearly everyone else. Keep up man.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  October 29, 2018

            I haven’r ever heard any political parties promising poverty for all, UNkindness, illfeeling and ruining the environment, so anyone who promises the opposite is stating the blindingly bleedin’ obvious

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  October 30, 2018

              Some people’s benefit raise was less than $1 a week. How generous.

  2. robertguyton

     /  October 29, 2018

    The transformation they haven’t made is the one National has; from Government to shattered, humiliated husk of a party. Labour, The Greens and NZ1st are looking governmental while their Opposition looks done.

    Reply
    • Ray

       /  October 29, 2018

      You should stick to plain water, first thing in the morning Robert, because what ever you are drinking, smoking is obviously brain altering.
      A “shattered, humiliated husk”!

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 29, 2018

        Honestly, Ray; National are looking like a dog’s-breakfast!

        Reply
        • David

           /  October 29, 2018

          Robert, you have been gently manipulated away from the theme of this thread of listing all the transformative things this government has done already.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  October 29, 2018

            David – transformation is an ongoing process, not a one-off event; does it have a cut off point, then stop of take on a new name? The best transformations are those that start out gently, like a train that eases out of the station, rather than starting with a jerk. Hacienda’s driving this train with finesse; that some here haven’t noticed that the journey is well under way already is no surprise to me.

            Reply
        • Corky

           /  October 29, 2018

          So was Labour at the last election. For National it was meant to be a formality..turn up; get elected and resume office.

          Hmmm.. don’t count your strike rate until all seeds have had a chance to spout, Robert.

          Reply
    • The Consultant

       /  October 29, 2018

      It’s typical of a Leftie government that they waste resources. For example, [Deleted personal attack . PG]

      Reply
  3. David

     /  October 29, 2018

    The coalition has transformed the press gallery from hard bitten cynical journalists into fan girls and enthusiastic stenographers.

    Reply
  4. David

     /  October 29, 2018

    They have transformed the lives of 18 middle class families by subsidizing an expensive Kiwibuild house for them, that is quite an achievement in just a year as long as no one mentions the 10,000 first home buyers who manage it each year without the photo shoot.

    Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  October 29, 2018

      Reply
  5. Blazer

     /  October 29, 2018

    can’t frighten the horses’ in the first term.
    Done more in 12 months than the Nats in 9 years ,when it comes to addressing problems like housing .

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  October 29, 2018

      Hilarious, B. And you said it with a straight face. Amazing.

      Reply
    • Traveller

       /  October 29, 2018

      Sorry Blazer, but you’re wrong.

      The McLennan Development. In which a 25 year old doctor and her 24 yr old Mark.Manager BF were handed the keys to a 4 bed house was a house (among others) started under National. Phil, in having us subsidise this “deserving” couple because he dreamed up KIWIBUILD has unleashed what’ll be far too few and what there are going to the middle classes. A travesty.

      Bahamas, Hawaii, New York, Vegas, LA, Croatia, Austria, Paris, London, Spain, Amsterdam… in May June this year for this couple. Their FB feeds show they’ve never struggled, never will and that this jackpot lottery has added to their luck pile.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  October 29, 2018

        just highlights the salaries needed to get into housing after 9 years of ramping property prices under National.
        I spoke to a RE manager of one of NZ’s biggest agencies and he said the extension of the brightline test to 5 years and the foreign buyers ban had halted the rise in house prices.=thanks Col govt.

        Key has flipped another recently for a tidy profit.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  October 29, 2018

          No mention of people leaving the country now Labour has wrecked the economy then?

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  October 29, 2018

            O.K….show how Labour has ‘wrecked the economy’….go right ahead…if you can.

            Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  October 29, 2018

          Show us how a 5 year BL has impacted on house prices in any way at all other than perhaps reducing listings?
          Foreign buyer ban came into force last week, so your RE manager was pretty quick off the mark.
          Do you think the fact prices are softening world wide, after going up world wide may have had some impact?

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  October 29, 2018

            Flippers/speculators don’t like the 5 year provision.
            The foreign buyer ban was foreshadowed .
            The RE manager has 40 years in the biz and knows the 3% figure for foreign buyers is pure B/S.
            His concern is selfish …he sees his revenues declining.

            Reply
            • High Flying Duck

               /  October 29, 2018

              Flippers / speculators always pay tax on their property sales so Bright Line has no impact whatsoever on them if they follow the rules. And IRD have been spending millions over the last 10 years ensuring people do.
              The foreign buyer ban will be interesting. We’ll see if there is any lasting effect.

            • Blazer

               /  October 29, 2018

              its supposed to be ineffectual according to National.

              According to you NZ is an exception in imposing a foreign buyers ban.
              As was pointed out to you the other day ,your knowledge about this topic is…’limited’..to be charitable.

        • PartisanZ

           /  October 29, 2018

          I concede that it doesn’t look good, and it does speak to the extraordinary expectations of young ‘Kiwi’ middle-class adults nowadays … but who wouldn’t take advantage of an income-unrestricted ballot?

          Righties can hardly blame a young, professional, entreprenuerial, ‘opportunist’ couple – one of their own – can they? [Yet here they are blaming them … Go figure!]

          Also, there could be several extenuating circumstances involved in their travel … which may have been planned well in advance of the ballot or its outcome …

          1) Combining Med School overseas ‘section’ or ‘sections’ with personal travel …
          2) Combining extended family travel into the above (which parent/elders may have subsidized or paid for … Righties can hardly blame them, can they?)
          3) Visiting other friends before “settling down” …?
          4) Other professional networking … by Fletcher … an element of ‘work-related’?
          5) Others … bereavement … who knows? I don’t care …

          And who would stalk them on Twitter FB to find out? Isn’t the issue Labour-led’s housing policy FFS?

          Maybe Labour-led should means test the ballot?

          Then the problem becomes so-called ‘democracy’, vote retention and the electoral cycle …

          Even in the derivative form of universal payment and differential tax, it was the death of the short-lived but imminently sensible superannuation clawback scheme years ago …

          Reply
      • https://instagram.com/envyfletcher?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=18lythkz4gfn4

        The male recipient of taxpayer largesse has a truly sybaritic lifestyle.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  October 29, 2018

          he is the archetypal American dreamer…( National voter feature),but if he is a qualified doctor at 25 he must also be quite smart.

          Ordinary people have been shut out of home ownership,compliments of..National.

          Reply
          • Traveller

             /  October 29, 2018

            No, he’s a marketing manager. She’s a doctor. You’re excused the heteronormative, sexist assumption

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  October 29, 2018

              very good…you stated it clearly…thanks for increasing my word power today..’.heteronormative’ and especially …’sybiritic’!

        • The Consultant

           /  October 29, 2018

          It’s long been the problem in NZ – and other Western nations too I admit – that the social welfare system, including health and education, supposedly designed to look after the poorest, have all been twisted into supporting the Middle Class (and above).

          This has been done because universal, free-for-all schemes could not have survived politically without the support of that class, hence the payoffs to them, the latest being the first year of university being “on me”. That’ll be expanded incrementally as well, election by election.

          Maybe Labour-led should means test the ballot?

          Yeah. I doubt it will happen though, because once you breach that wall of universality…

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  October 29, 2018

            Yes and no … Social Security was designed to look after everyone, which obviously meant looking after the poorest more than others …

            You make a pretty good argument for some fairly draconian ‘Fair & Just’ legislation which would take Superannuation – for instance – out of the political arena … make it ‘untouchable’ … like (so-called) Fiscal Responsibility appears to be …?

            Otherwise we’ve got no option but to continue dealing in ‘vested interest’ oligarchy or whatever you want to call it … ‘managed democracy’ or Inverted Totalitarianism …

            Just don’t try to convince me this so-called ‘democracy’ is the ultimate form of social organisation …

            Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  October 29, 2018

    Watched David Parker last night trying to be transformative – trying to smooch Trump on trade after Saint Jacinda’s thoughtless cheap shots screwed NZ’s pitch for the same deals as Oz.

    Reply
  7. robertguyton

     /  October 29, 2018

    The Prime Minister has transformed our international image from the laughing-stock Key made it, to NZ as the darling of the world’s governments. Mother Jacinda has done more for New Zealand’s reputation than any PM before her and done it with good humour and grace.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  October 29, 2018

      On a par with B for sheer, wilful and inane fantasy.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 29, 2018

        Focus on the question of Pete’s post, Alan, not attempting to demean the ideas of others, then we’ll take note of what you write.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  October 29, 2018

          You do not speak for others, What “we” take note of is what each of us decides to.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  October 29, 2018

            You are speaking for others – funny!

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              No, I’m not. Are you truly THAT much of a fool, robert?

              If you had the skills to read for comprehension – and not seemingly just allow words flow past your eyes with nothing but random connections – to the biases in your mind, you would see that instantly, as I imagine most other people do.

              Each of us decides individually what we do, and I am simply telling you that above. It seems you are one of those very limited people who cannot see anything beyond the confines of their own blinkers.

            • “as I imagine most other people do.”
              Classic!

            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              Idiocy confirmed.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 29, 2018

              Gezza – your ideas don’t always have inner consistency, something I’m trying to point out to you. For example, you said:
              “Each of us decides individually what we do, and I am simply telling you that above. It seems you are one of those very limited people who cannot see anything beyond the confines of their own blinkers.” but failed to notice the inner contradiction where you’ve declared that “each of us” makes decisions about what to do, but then you went on to describe people, into which group you assigned me a place, who don’t do that. Curious. I won’t call you a fool or describe your claims as idiotic, as it’s not how I roll, despite the temptation to do as the Romans do.

            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              Look don’t worry about taking the time to nicely & patiently explain the strange workings of your pendantic mind to me, robert. I’m busy & I’m going up to visit ma soon and I think I’ll probably just be skipping over your comments today because reading and replying to any of them is just wasting my time, which I think is what you want.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 29, 2018

              And there it is – proof-positive that we think the same way about somethings! I hope your ma is comfortable and well and/or improving.

        • For you to say Key made us a laughing stock over his 9 years is patently ignorant of all facts. Keep up living in this imaginary parallel universe as much as you like, but the reality is is that much of what the left consider transformative is illusory virtue signalling .

          It is not enough to talk to empty UN chambers, to Captains call and use NYC agencies to chronicle vacuity, staged rhetoric and baby pimping. This focus on Ardern will not transform a society. CHILD POVERTY, ostensibly Arden’s biggie, has not been impacted one iota. It won’t be as long as education continues on it’s one size fits all race to mediocrity, as long as unemployed, unloving, uncaring parents are rewarded for failing in their duty of care.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  October 29, 2018

            I remember well Key’s media flops overseas, as do many, many New Zealanders. Jacinda behaved flawlessly and wooed the world’s media; would you like me to link to some of those examples?

            Reply
            • No thanks, I have both a memory and a full life. Knock yourself out though

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  October 29, 2018

              I remember she wore a nice cloak, likes Trudeau and insulted Trump.

              I’m unconvinced thst transformed our international image or even hers.

            • The Consultant

               /  October 29, 2018

              I remember well Key’s media flops overseas, as do many, many New Zealanders.

              Surely then you could have identified them, perhaps with links to prove your point?

              On the other hand, I could point to the comments captured at various international meetings, which showed that Key was held in high regard by leaders as varied as Cameron, Gillard, Turnbull, and Obama:

              Column inches have been written in newspapers and magazines around the world exploring the reasons for the Key government’s success. There are also plenty of questions about it from curious foreign leaders whenever Key attends an international gathering.

              That’s from Tracey Watkins, not exactly a cheerleader for National or Key but a grudging admission.
              He got on so well with the Queen of England that she invited him and his family to stay at Balmoral.

              And I say all of this as somebody who was never anygreat admirer of the man as PM, regarding him as a go-along-to-get-along character from before he was elected. Certainly not transformative – but in that respect Jacinda will follow in his footsteps, in keeping with the NZ’s voters and their philosophy of extreme centrism.

            • Blazer

               /  October 29, 2018

              @the Consultant…’

              He got on so well with the Queen of England that she invited him and his family to stay at Balmoral.’

              So did Assad.

              Google Key-Hardtalk’….torn to shreds.

            • The Consultant

               /  October 29, 2018

              So did Assad.
              Back when he was also being wined and dined by Obama’s Secretary of State, John Kerry.

              As well as Assad being talked up by them, Hillary Clinton, and many US Lefties, as a “moderate” Arab leader who could be reasoned with by smart Democrats after that Wrecking Cowboy Bush. In fact I recall various Lefties here in NZ ooing and aaahhing over all this Smart Power at the same time.

              So the Queen probably felt she was in virtuous company in treating Assad like a normal political leader.

            • Blazer

               /  October 29, 2018

              @the Consultant…you do not need to try and make excuses for Liz….with your long bow assumptions.

            • PartisanZ

               /  October 29, 2018

              OMG … the Consultant … didn’t you know?

              Democrats and Republicans are slightly different branches of the Right …

              Like the East & West ‘Wings’ of Buckingham Palace …

            • The Consultant

               /  October 29, 2018

              you do not need to try and make excuses for Liz….with your long bow assumptions.

              Chuckles. “Excuses”: way to stay on the offense when you’ve been presented with history that runs contrary to your narrative. I merely demonstrated that “Liz” was in good company with all the Leftie folks who were thinking this way about Assad before in 2009-10 – including you I’d bet and… oh wait…

              Democrats and Republicans are slightly different branches of the Right …

              Chuckle. Of course, of course, of course….. Like Labour and National, amiiright? That’s your fallback position as well, Blazer? Like PatisanZ there was no mindless cheering for Barack in 2008, correct?

              You two are pure Lefties. You’ll likely be saying the same about Jacinda by the mid-2020’s.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 29, 2018

              I remember Key minced.

            • PartisanZ

               /  October 29, 2018

              I’m saying the same about Jacinda NOW!

              This, however, does not write her off … just as MJ Savage committing NZ to WW2 does not write him off …

          • Blazer

             /  October 29, 2018

            Consulting ‘life coach’ to her Majesty…

            ‘So the Queen probably felt she was in virtuous company in treating Assad like a normal political leader.’. 😉

            Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  October 29, 2018

          I already did, Robert.
          https://yournz.org/2018/10/29/after-a-year-how-transformative-has-the-labour-led-government-been/#comment-321485

          And then I focused on B’s and your claptrap and words didn’t fail me.

          Reply
      • The Consultant

         /  October 29, 2018

        Ah – so my little crack above was a “personal attack”. Okay then, how about this – and note its similarity to that of Alan’s comment…

        Guyton’s statement reveals that he lives a rich and deep fantasy life in his head?

        Personal attack? I’d say that it’s a little bit of humour entirely in keeping with a comment as deeply and trollingly ludricous as:

        …. from the laughing-stock Key made it, to NZ as the darling of the world’s governments. Mother Jacinda has …..

        [For guidance, you can say what you think of what someone says here, or what you think of them (within reason), but suggesting thinks like psychiatrists is not appropriate, nor is it necessary to make a point. One person’s ‘humour’ can be seen or taken as an attack by others. And it can easily escalate. Debate works better without it. PG]

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  October 29, 2018

          Thank you, Consultant, my inner world is rich and deep, it’s true. All inner worlds, btw, are fantasy, yours included.

          Reply
          • The Consultant

             /  October 29, 2018

            I’ll take you at your word, given that your inner world has Mother Jacinda inside it. I must admit I got some good chuckles at that piece of overblown trolling and imagery.

            Reply
            • Lol must admit that the label “Mother” Jacinda got to me. She’s given birth to a child, yes. Let’s at least double that and come back in twenty years and see what sort of a “mother” she has been before we bestow that label shall we.

            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              Nope – she’s got a baby, she’s a mother. Clarke has too & stays home to look after her. So he’s a mother, too . 😉

            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              Although I know what you’re saying – Mother To The Nation my arse. Gotta be a grandma before you can call yourself that.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 29, 2018

              “Although I know what you’re saying – Mother To The Nation my arse.”
              If that’s what you thought I was saying, you thought wrong.
              Was Mother Teresa, “Mother To The Nation”?

            • Gezza

               /  October 29, 2018

              I wasn’t talking to you. I was talking to TC and Trav.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 29, 2018

              Oh, I see – goddit!

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  October 29, 2018

      Mother Jacinda…pass the bucket….

      She had her 15 minutes and is probably now forgotten by the people who fawned on her during it.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  October 29, 2018

        Kitty’s right, there’s no doubt! Jacinda’s a has-been and her brief window of popularity is over . No one cares about her or her baby . It’s time we got a real PM, such as John Key was surely a great one and played golf and didn’t breast feed in the House. Ardern! Flibbertigibbet! Girl!

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  October 30, 2018

          I don’t think that many people want to see the PM’s tits.

          John Key played golf in his own time, not work time; that’s the difference.

          If you seriously think that people in the US are still thinking about NZ’s PM, you’re dreaming. John Key was a great success there, but I don’t suppose that people are still thinking about him.

          I wish that Jacinda Ardern would buy a hairbrush, she looks very unkempt,

          Reply
  8. PartisanZ

     /  October 29, 2018

    Matike Mai Aotearoa is transformational ….

    This Labour-led government is a significant improvement on National. They might be described as movers of some minor short-term change, and ‘reframers’ and possible precipitators of some potentially more major long-term changes, like zero carbon and justice … which could easily be undone by our irrational so-called ‘democracy’ with its 3 year election cycle.

    Governments are hamstrung by the economy now – by corporate-political elites – as proven by our response to the GFC compared to, for instance, First Labour’s response to the Great Depression …

    Our response to the GFC was to as quickly as possible recreate very similar conditions for another possible GFC … Like, there must have been something wrong with the toxicity levels, lets try a slightly different toxic blend …

    Nothing transformative about that …

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  October 29, 2018

      Very progressive not:

      When Matapopore published its urban design guide for the anchor projects in 2015 it included the words: “For the Christchurch rebuild Ngāi Tūāhuriri are the right people to engage with, and as is the custom on the marae, the locals always have the first say and the last say on any matter.”

      And
      Sacha McMeeking, the head of Canterbury University’s School of Māori and Indigenous Studies, says attaching the monopoly label to Matapopore’s rebuild role is misleading.

      As mana whenua, the iwi with authority over the land, Ngāi Tahu has a mandate similar to a local council, she says.
      https://matapopore.co.nz/a-matter-of-trust-iwi-voice-in-ch…/?

      Crown counsel likewise challenged – we think correctly – its use to describe the general authority of a particular group over any area of land. We are inclined to think that the term “mana whenua” is an unhelpful 19th century innovation that does violence to cultural integrity. However, subject to such arrangements as may have been settled by the people themselves, our main concern is with the use of the words “mana whenua” to imply that only one group can speak for all in a given area when in fact there are several distinct communities of interest, or to assume that one group has a priority of interest in all topics for consideration. Some matters may be rightly within the purview of one group but not another.
      https://www.victoria.ac.nz/law/research/publications/vuwlr/prev-issues/vol-42-2/Iorns.pdf

      Reply
  9. sorethumb

     /  October 29, 2018

    Winston Peters has yet again used an obvious and absurd anti-migrant diversion to distract from his failure to achieve his core promise of reducing migration, Bernard Hickey argues.
    https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/10/03/263430/when-deflection-and-distraction-are-easier

    But what would you expect with the Greens in the coalition of loosers

    Reply
  10. Zedd

     /  October 29, 2018

    Sadly.. It will likely take more than a year.. or even one term in Govt. to repair the damage of 9 loooong years of total neglect & policies that only supported the wealthy OR at least the 50.1% who kept them in power during that time.

    “All we are saying.. is give Lab/NZF/Grns (& peace) a chance…” 🙂

    Reply
  11. wooden goat

     /  October 29, 2018

    Labour have been **very** “transformative. Problem is, the “transformation” has been from good to *bad*.

    Charter schools. Staffed by people *hugely* passionate about their work, and did a *great* job with their students, particularly Maori and Pasifika children. The children loved them. The parents loved them. Now gone, thanks to union-run Labour.

    Taranaki oil industry – Destroyed, thanks to Labour and the Greens.
    No-one in their right mind would invest in the oil/gas industry there now. Far too much political risk (to add to the risk of even *finding* oil in the first place).

    Unemployment – heading UP, for the first time in 8-9 years, coinciding with a great easing of benefit sanctions.

    “Refugee” numbers – heading up, due to Princess Cindy’s determination to follow Merkel’s lead and turn us into the Germanistan of the South Pacific.

    Strikes – massively up, again for the first time in nine years. The unions know that (a) they run Labour, and (b) Labour are a “soft touch”.

    Busioness confidence – DOWN. Surprise, surprise – businesses know that Labour are plonkers when it comes to running the country.

    The next couple of years should be very interesting. However, I would put money on Labour getting back in, if for no other reason than the group that put them in in the first place – women – are suckers for Cindy’s flashy smile and the nonsense that she spouts.

    – w.g.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  October 29, 2018

      Ok, now that’s got a distinct anti-Labour bias on it, but to me that’s a good comment, robert, because whether I agree with any of it or not, it’s his own thinking, not some copy & paste of someone else’s from another blog, and it sets out a number of specific reasons for his conclusion.

      Reply
      • Yep, really good comment, because it’s his own thinking! We need more of this sort of thinking – ” businesses know that Labour are plonkers” – astute, perceptive, balanced and pertinent. Wood goat is representative of thinkers we need to respect for the way they don’t refer to other’s views – keep it real, wood goat, ” Princess Cindy” is a fair title to use and exposes her for the shallow girl she is. Gezza, thanks for taking the time to put me straight on this! Now, I can rest easy.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  October 29, 2018

          I filter out the rhetroric and parochialism, and look at the underlying factors being presented for the conclusion that the government has been transformative but wg sees those as pointers to negative outcomes.

          I find tirades against parties or individuals not very interesting & sarcasm like some of that in there tedious – I’l just skip over it becos its meaningless dross – but lots of posters do this – & my point is that, for me, there are several factors listed that support his conclusion so his conclusion the outcomes may be more negative than positive is something I will take on board and think about.

          I’m not sure if you’ve listed any factors that you think indicate the transformation claimed is producing measurable positive results overall for NZers yet. They might do, I’m still open to that and would vote accordingly next time if I thought we were better off.

          But in terms of measurable results there’s not much to go on yet. Prison remands are down 7% – great. What’s happening to the crime rate? Is that up 7%? Is it even actually down?? Who knows? These are the sorts of indicators I look for with transformational change – not just one, but the impacts elsewhere if any.

          Like tons more strikes and government employees using them to demand more money than Labour budgeted for – and not giving a shit they haven’t got it. So that’s going to be tricky to manage. And petrol prices going up plus ADDITIONAL levies on them (#moretaxes).I’m keeping an eye on my wallet too, if you know what I mean.

          Reply
    • Blazer

       /  October 30, 2018

      I see you’re on a ‘fact free’ diet wooden goat.

      Reply
      • Griff.

         /  October 30, 2018

        Wooden goat is the well known troll kea/ krissx/ reality check from KB who changed his name there to get around the only permanent ban DPF has given out in over a decade.
        She has no interest in facts just makes up shite to troll.

        Taranaki oil industry
        The gas fields are running out.
        Nothing to do with the goverment.
        The future prospects are a long way from Taranak .

        Unemployment….Made up dribbling.
        https://www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/unemployment-rate

        Each year New Zealand accepts 750 refugees per year, increasing to 1000 in July 2018,
        Hardly mass immigration from refugees many more Muslims come here under our corrupted immigration regime a mess left by national.

        Strikes – massively up, again for the first time in nine years
        We can not keep nursers or teachers because we have not kept their incomes up to inflation for years .We have to increase pay or risk having to close hospitals and schools due to lack off staff to man them.

        Busioness confidence – DOWN. Surprise, surprise yet our terms of trade have improved and the share market is doing ok.
        It more the poor businesses worried they might have to treat their employees better and not shite in the environment than the reality of trading.

        Reply
  1. After a year how transformative has the Labour-led Government been? — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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