Submitting to the Criminal Justice Advisory Group

It’;s fair to say I am not entirely happy with my experiences with the judicial system. I think there are ways it can be improved, so I have approached the Criminal Justice Advisory Group offering some input. They are visiting Dunedin and I will be able to meet them.

I have specific issues to address, but am open to other ideas to put forward.

Any suggestions on how our judicial system could be improved?

From Hāpaitia te Oranga Tangata Safe and Effective Justice:  Criminal Justice Advisory Group to visit the regions

The Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group – Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora – is visiting towns and cities across New Zealand to hear what people want from their criminal justice system.

They will hold a series of meetings from mid-October 2018, including public drop-in sessions.

Chair of te Uepū, Hon Chester Borrows said he is looking forward to hearing from people whose lives and work are affected by the criminal justice system, and canvassing ideas on how it can be improved.

They will be in each region on the following dates:

  • Taranaki: 15 November
  • Whanganui/Manawatū/Horowhenua: 16-17 November
  • Otago/Southland: 19-21 November
  • Wellington: 23 November
  • West Coast: 27-28 November
  • Hawke’s Bay/Wairarapa: 28-29 November
  • East Coast: 3-4 December
  • Tasman/Marlborough: 10-11 December

They plan to carry out further public engagement in 2019.

You can also make submissions: Tell us your views

We want to hear your views so we can have a conversation about building a better justice system.

What we will do with the information you give us

  • We will read the information you give us, and analyse it so we understand it.
  • We might use the findings to propose recommendations to the Minister of Justice on changing the justice system.

Submit here: https://safeandeffectivejustice.govt.nz/have-your-say/your-views/

 

 

7 Comments

  1. High Flying Duck

     /  November 15, 2018

    The justice system is anything but – and it is a worldwide issue.

    This story from the UK is breathtakingly sad – a boy killed and killers end up getting a better life because of it, while the victim’s family get ignored and are left with nothing.:

    “The father of James Bulger last night reacted with fury after one of the toddler’s killers admitted he had enjoyed a “better life” as a result of being locked up for a crime which shocked the United Kingdom.

    Robert Thompson also said he had benefitted from “a better education” during eight years in a secure unit after he and Jon Venables were convicted of murdering the 2-year-old, a documentary to screen tonight in the UK reveals.
    ….
    Thompson says: “I do feel aware that I am now a better person and have had a better life and a better education than if I had not committed the murder.

    “There is obviously an irony to this but it is part of my remorseful feelings as well.”

    But last night James’s father Ralph said the confession confirmed what he and James’s mother Denise had long believed – that Thompson and Venables had been rewarded rather than punished for the crime.

    “For 25 years I have insisted that Thompson and Venables have been rewarded not punished for murdering my baby son,” Bulger, 51, told the Daily Mail.

    “The message here is horrific – kill a child and you will get a privileged and cosy life in return.

    “I have always said that these pair have never been punished at all.”

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=12160159

  2. Kitty Catkin

     /  November 15, 2018

    Childkillers as a rule have anything but a nice life in prison from what I gather; they and paedophiles are seen as fair game. The two words ‘better life’ are taken out of context. The other killer has had a more predictable life, I think.

    I remember when the UK Government wanted to send the two out here and were told what NZ thought of that idea.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  November 15, 2018

      The other one is back inside and likely to remain there.

      The interview also says that he is desperately sorry and remorseful for the crime. It needs to be read in full. His own childhood was so bad that being inside was better, as being on the streets was better than being at home at the age of 10. He was also a victim.He has made something of his life, unlike the other boy who was the one who persuaded him to take part.

      The other one has been convicted of child porn offences and shows no signs of wanting to change. He will probably spend most or all of his life behind bars.

  3. Gezza

     /  November 15, 2018

    If there’s anything that can be done to stop Sir Alan adorning his fences with the bodies of dead bureaucrats that might be worth getting them to consider.

    • Gezza

       /  November 15, 2018

      Can’t be good for the horses.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  November 15, 2018

        Horses have spring fever and bucked off my stepdaughter tonight. Hobbled in with a sprained ankle. Reckons the young grass has too much sugar. Might have to take a few bureaucrats off the fence to make a softer landing. Guess it was a bad idea to use the bareback pad instead of the saddle.

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