Britain and EU agree on post-Brexit relationship

Reuters:  EU, Britain agree draft deal on future relations

Britain and the European Union have agreed a draft text setting out a close post-Brexit relationship, though wrangling with Spain over control of Gibraltar must still be settled before EU leaders meet on Sunday in order to rubber-stamp the pact.

“The British people want Brexit to be settled. They want a good deal that sets us on a course for a brighter future,” British Prime Minister Theresa May told parliament.

“The deal that will enable us to do this is now within our grasp. In these crucial 72 hours ahead, I will do everything possible to deliver it for the British people.”

Her spokesman said she believed she could win a critical vote in parliament on the deal, expected next month, but many of those she needs to persuade appeared unconvinced.

Guardian: May defends under-fire Brexit plan: ‘a deal is within our grasp’

Painting the agreement as a bespoke and carefully negotiated plan, May told MPs it disproved the idea that the only relationships on offer would be Norway or Canada. “The text we have now agreed would create a new free trade area with the EU, with no tariffs, fees, charges or quantitative restrictions. This will be the first such agreement from the EU with any advanced economy in the world – and will be good for jobs,” she said.

“Crucially the text we have agreed has an explicit reference to the development of an independent trade policy by the UK beyond this partnership with the EU, so we would have the abilities to sign new trade deals and capitalise on new trade deals with the fastest-growing economies around the world. We will be able to get on with this negotiating deals during the transition period.”

May said there was “an explicit commitment to consider facilitative arrangement and technologies to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland”, and thanked Iain Duncan Smith and Owen Paterson for their input on that, which was jeered by some Tory MPs. Paterson and Duncan Smith saw the prime minister in Downing Street last week.

May also reiterated that she had held talks about Gibraltar with Spain, saying: “I was absolutely clear that Gibraltar’s British sovereignty will be protected.”

She ended: “The British people want Brexit to be settled. They want a good deal that sets us on course for a brighter future. And they want us to come together as a country and to move on and focus on the big issues at home. The deal that will enable us to do this, is now within our grasp. In these crucial 72 hours, I will do everything in my power to deliver this to the British people.”

Guardian: Brexit political declaration fails to offer frictionless trade

A joint document on Britain’s post-Brexit relationship with the EU fails to offer any hope of frictionless trade, said to be vital to the British economy, but provides Theresa May with arguments to bolster her hopes of selling the deal to Brexiters in parliament.

leaked 26-page political declaration, to be approved by EU leaders at a Brexit summit on Sunday, paints a picture of the future relationship that differs substantially from the proposals made by the prime minister at Chequers in the summer.

According to the declaration the two sides “envisage having a trading relationship on goods that is as close as possible”, but the EU and the UK would be separate markets with inevitable barriers to trade, and there is no reference to a common rulebook.

The document does reassert the plan for both sides to “build and improve on the single customs territory” already negotiated in the withdrawal agreement.

 

Leave a comment

11 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  November 23, 2018

    Yes and No. They have only agreed on what areas they will look at and explore in the post Brexit relationship, however, the chances of this 1. being translated into any kind of FTA and 2. even getting to the point of being able to be negotiated are still looking shaky.

    If May gets the withdrawal agreement passed then if the deal isn’t agreed in the transition period (which it won’t be as Spain want concessions on Gibraltar and France want free access to UK waters for fishing) then the backstop comes into force, and basically that is the end of any hope of the UK extricating itself from the EU apparatus, as there is no clause for UK to have unilateral removal from the backstop, and the EU most likely won’t let them as long as they have control over the UK and are getting its money, and stopping the UK from being able to negotiate FTA’s outside the EU.

    May’s negotiating team are just digging the UK in deeper and deeper with no chance of them ever getting out.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  November 23, 2018

      The UK is a sovereign nation and as such is able to abrogate any treaty it wishes and then deal with the consequences.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  November 23, 2018

        Same with any arrangements between Bibi>Jared/Ivanka>Trump & Saudi Arabia

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  November 23, 2018

          And we could be doing something similar too. What’s our Foreign Minister doing about the Crown Prince organising a murder in an Embassy? Or are we dealing with this with kindness? Anybody know?

          Reply
      • Missy

         /  November 24, 2018

        Unfortunately Remainers (and the EU) have some blind spot regarding the EU in thinking that it is some God Like organisation that everyone must bow down to, and the UK Government is too weak to challenge them.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  November 24, 2018

          Honestly, can’t they see that if the French were in their shoes they wouldn’t give worrying about bucking the EU a second thought?

          Reply
          • Missy

             /  November 24, 2018

            They are brainwashed into the cult of the EU.

            The French won’t be in the same situation in the near future, Macron has said he would never give the French people a say on EU membership because he believes they would vote the same as the UK has. That says it all about how the EU is.

            Reply
  2. david in aus

     /  November 23, 2018

    It’s sad to see Britain is afraid of her own shadow.

    Worry-worts on food supply and medicine after Brexit. How does NZ survive by being out of the EU? Sad.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  November 23, 2018

      Just like our flag “debate”, David. It turns into a proxy for a zillion other things and is completely irrational.

      Reply
    • Missy

       /  November 24, 2018

      That whole ‘how does (insert country of choice) survive out of the EU’ argument is the one Leavers throw out, but according to Remainers the EU is different and it isn’t that easy for a country that has been inside to survive outside it. *rolls eyes*

      They are going overboard with their panic, and the more extreme their panic is the less anyone listens to them.

      Reply
  1. Britain and EU agree on post-Brexit relationship — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s