Media watch – Friday

23 November 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

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26 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  November 23, 2018

    Weird happenings with Gezza, not Corky
    MARK QUINLIVAN 12:06, Nov 22 2018
    “An argument between a husband and wife at a South Canterbury address on Wednesday night led to police being called after the woman wanted to go to the pub, but the man did not.

    A police spokeswoman said they were called to the “family harm episode” in Mill Rd, Waimate, on Wednesday night after a man and woman were arguing.

    The spokeswoman said one of the parties had reportedly been consuming alcohol.

    Acting Senior Sergeant Grant Lord, of Timaru, said the argument was caused by the man wanting to go to bed, but the woman wanting to go to the pub.

    Lord said police attended the scene to offer advice to the couple. No charges were laid and no police safety orders were issued.”
    . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Stuff.co

    Reply
    • Ray

       /  November 23, 2018

      Waimate women have a certain reputation down here, [deleted, that’s not fair], I could do some investigation if you really wanted to know more.

      Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  November 23, 2018

    Identifying war hero Willie Apiata ‘adversely impacted’ his Afghanistan service

    At the inquiry into claims made in the book Hit and Run, Paul Radich argued that the identities of past and serving SAS soldiers should be kept secret.

    Identifying Victoria Cross recipient Willie Apiata hampered his military service when he returned to Afghanistan, a lawyer for the Defence Force has argued.

    Former SAS corporal Apiata was honoured with the military’s highest award for bravery for his actions in Afghanistan in 2004. That attracted widespread publicity – as did the publication of his photograph during combat in Kabul in 2009.

    “The importance of anonymity to them underlies the essence of the service itself,” he said.

    But he was questioned by inquiry co-chair Sir Terence Arnold about Apiata’s return to Afghanistan. Radich said he understood the publicity “adversely affected” his operational capability.

    Hit and Run journalist Nicky Hager arrives at the High Court on day two of the hearing.
    Radich explained the ranks of the elite soldiers are small, with limited numbers on stand-by. “If this is compromised the ability of New Zealand to respond comprehensively with this special force is restricted,” he said.

    He also said they may become targets for exploitation or extremists, and their personal safety and “wellness,” as well as that of their families, must be protected.

    The Wellington-based Government inquiry is testing events described in Hit and Run, SAS raids in Afghanistan in 2010 and death of six civilians.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/108781718/disclosing-foreign-intelligence-risks-nzs-reputation-hit-and-run-inquiry-hears

    Reply
    • Noel

       /  November 23, 2018

      Hager been on the slopes. Racoon look probably be appropriate when the result comes in.

      Reply
  3. Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 23, 2018

      Māori slam Taxpayers Union for koha comments

      is an annoying headline. Isn’t that rather like saying

      Pakeha slam Jones for taking money from National

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  November 23, 2018

        Yes, it’s witless and a generalisation. ‘Slam’ is a cliched weasel word, like ‘snub’ and ‘adorable’, both of which have been used and used and used.

        The TPU has a point, though. It could be seen as, well, not a blatant bribe but placing an unspoken obligation on someone, depending on how much it was. If someone does something like that, it does put a moral obligation on the other person, it’s a very old dodge.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  November 23, 2018

        @G, No it isn’t because Maori still claim an iwi structure whose existence justifies compensation for historic wrongs and whose leaders speak for Maori.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  November 23, 2018

          Kitty, Corks and PDB make good points. Yours goes totally off the rails as that has nothing to do with the issue of koha.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  November 23, 2018

            Neither has your comment which I am disputing then.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  November 23, 2018

              I improved on it below, though, miseryguts.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  November 23, 2018

              Sore loser.

            • Gezza

               /  November 23, 2018

              I know you are. We all do.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  November 23, 2018

              Everyone can see who started the name-calling, G. Don’t make it worse. See what happened to Robert.

            • Gezza

               /  November 23, 2018

              😳

              I didn’t call you a sore loser. You called yourself one !

              I even agreed with you ! God, you’re a contrary blighter, Sir Alan ! :/

              What are they putting in the water up there? o_O

    • Corky

       /  November 23, 2018

      As long as the government gives Pakeha koha when they visit a pakeha community hall for meetings, I don’t have a problem. But the government doesn’t do that, so this practice should be stopped.

      Witness the Waitangi Marae fiasco using government koha.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  November 23, 2018

        That’s a good point – Davis is talking like only Marae provide volunteer services so there is a need for koha just in those instances. Govt ministers would visit hundreds of non-Maori community groups each year yet those groups wouldn’t receive (or expect) a payment for any volunteer works carried out in relation to an MP visiting.

        Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  November 23, 2018

    Koha is an example of the reciprocity which is a common feature of much Māori tradition, and often involves the giving of gifts by visitors (manuhiri) to a host marae. Traditionally this has often taken the form of food although taonga (treasured possessions) are also sometimes offered as koha, and in modern times money.

    The koha reflects the mana of both the giver and the recipient, reflecting what the giver is able to give, and the esteem they hold of the person or group they are making the gift to – and hence plays an important part in cementing good relations, and is taken very seriously, with misunderstanding having the potential to give offence.

    This traditional practice of koha remains active today in New Zealand in Māori contexts. At hui, any money given helps with the actual costs associated with the meeting, and for the benefit of non-Māori unfamiliar with the custom some marae may suggest a particular amount to be given as koha, but it remains a freely given gift rather than a charge for services or a facilities.
    – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
    Wikipedia. Although this is what I have understood koha to be, and in particular, when visiting marae that it is intended to help with the costs of providing hospitality and services to manuhiri (visitors).

    I first encountered this in practice when I was invited aboard a bus full o fof manuhiri from Northland who were visiting Kokiri Marae in Seaview for the dedication of a major carving work to be installed at my workplace and which had been carved by a member of the Northland marae.

    It was a funny and fascinating bus ride. A lot of humour, although much korero in Maori and it needed explaining to me. Then the bus stopped, before we got to the marae and they all got off, and I asked why – “Mimi” they said, “before we get there”. When they’d all had a wee at some public loo I think from memory they all got back on the bus and then one of them came round with a big envelope and they all put money in – big notes, not small change.

    “Koha”, one of them said to me. “It’s for the marae, to help pay for our costs”. So I reached for my wallet, and one of them put his hand on mine and said “No. You don’t need to. You’re with us. We’ve covered you”.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 23, 2018

      (Also, when we got there, and they had the powhiri – the speeches went on for well over a bloody hour and there was a lot more laughing at jokes that needed explaining to me – and I was soon wishing I’d got off for a mimi too! They knew what they were doing ! 😀 )

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  November 23, 2018

      Yes, it’s a sad Maori who turns up at a marae function without koha. The pre mimi is a prerequisite for anyone who’ll be a guest of honour on the paepae. The worst comes with the hongi and greeting. Maori who look after their oral hygiene fear those who don’t; along with those who don’t discreetly pop a mint or a quick spray before the meet and greet.

      Reply

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