Phil Twyford on the new Housing and Urban Development Authority

The new Housing and Urban Development Authority (HUDA) is going to have broad powers including being able to ignore existing council designations, amend or write its own by-laws and grant its own resource consent, and councils will have no veto power. “It’s going to be a tooled-up agency that can cut through the red tape” – Minister Phil Twyford.

I wouldn’t be surprised if that dismays some councils.

Also:

There will be ‘no change’ for Housing NZ tenants under the new Housing and Urban Development Authority

It is a shame that HUDA needs to be given extraordinary powers like this, other than making the Resource Management act fit for purpose.

More from and interview with Twyford on Nation yesterday:

  • Housing and Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford says the new Housing and Urban Development Authority (HUDA) will act “in partnership” with local iwi, councils and the private sector. “We’re creating a really joined-up one-stop shop that can sit alongside the council and unlock these big developments and allow us to crack into it with pace and scale.”
  • Mr Twyford said while the agency will also contain Housing New Zealand subsidiary HLC, becoming the Government’s primary provider for housing, there would be no change for HNZ tenants. “There will be no significant difference for those people. I want to reassure them that their rent, their tenancy arrangements, their houses – that’s not going to change at all.”
  • The HUDA will have broad powers, including being able to ignore existing council designations, amend or write its own by-laws and grant its own resource consent, and councils will have no veto power. “It’s going to be a tooled-up agency that can cut through the red tape,” said Mr Twyford.
  • He said land use regulation and the rules that govern development projects had been solely in the hands of councils and that was “not working”. “We have to change things, and we’re putting central government in there to work alongside councils.”
  • He said he hoped the authority will mean developments could go “from concept to building within 12 months”.
  • Mr Twyford said the HUDA will have a $100 million injection to get it started but will also have access to Kiwibuild and Housing NZ Funds, because state homes and Kiwibuild funds would be part of the projects.
  • The HUDA will also have the power of forced acquisition, where private land owners can be can be forced to sell to make way for a development – but the minister says the powers are just “in the back pocket”. “I don’t think it’s likely at all that someone’s private property or their house will be acquired for one of these projects.”
  • Mr Twyford said the cost of Kiwibuild had not been underestimated, and he would not be asking for more funds in the next budget. He said the point of the $2 billion fund was to be “recycled over and over”.
  • He said victims of the meth testing debacle would soon be compensated. “Every tenant who has come forward and has their eligibility for payment under the scheme we set up, we will get their payments [to them] before Christmas.” He said Housing New Zealand was proactively working with MSD to try and track down people eligible for compensation who haven’t yet come forward.
  • He said those who had been unfairly kicked out of homes were being prioritised on the HNZ waiting list. “People should not be living in cars. And my advice is that Housing New Zealand is doing everything it can to make sure that people who were affected in that way, that that situation is put right.”

Full interview transcript at Scoop.

Leave a comment

21 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  November 25, 2018

    It is a shame that HUDA needs to be given extraordinary powers like this, other than making the Resource Management act fit for purpose.

    1ewes at 6 gave Judith Collins a 2 second sound bite to say the same thing last night.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  November 25, 2018

      I missed the beginning of this story and now wish that I had watched it on 3+1.

      The idea of being able to override councils, who are elected by the people is appalling. What if the HUBRIS decides to take my house and put a block of flats on it, or force people off their lifestyle blocks ?

      A shame ? It’s appalling.

      Reply
  2. David

     /  November 25, 2018

    Brownlee had similar type powers in Christchurch and he and Nick Smith used them to open up large areas for new housing and forced the council to put in infrastructure and they funded the roads and schools etc. and Christchurch has had flat house prices for 5 years.
    Been very succesful and I say that as someone who would benefit enormously from rising house prices. First home buyers is where the action is and its cheaper to own than rent now.
    Lets see if Twyford will use the same approach in Auckland.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 25, 2018

      How did they force the council to put in infrastructure?

      Reply
      • David

         /  November 25, 2018

        Under the Christchurch earthquake legislation they were able to force the council to provide services to much needed new subdivisions. It was a partnership really with both sides recognizing the extreme pressure of finding houses for the 7000 that were knocked over.
        Auckland is in a similar situation just not such a sudden one.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  November 25, 2018

          Well, if you believe that this will be a partnership, you must believe that there are fairies at the bottom of your garden.

          Reply
          • David

             /  November 25, 2018

            The experience in Christchurch was a partnership…until Dalziel was elected mayor then it was a battle. For all his faults Mayor Parker understood the needs of his city especially the less well off parts of it and worked with Brownlee to supply land ready for developers.
            There is probably 20 years of supply all along modernized transport links. Its great for first home buyers/young persons where for a couple I think its 19% of a couples income needed for accommodation costs for your own home.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  November 25, 2018

              Thanks for that David. I find your perspectives on housing issues very informative generally, I might say. What I really meant – as artcroft spots below – was how were they able to compel the council to put in infrastructure, given that presumably ratepayers have to stump up ultimately for council-commissioned works?

    • Nookin

       /  November 25, 2018

      There was some justification for a degree of autocracy after the earthquakes. Day to day legislation does not really cater for the destruction of a city. In this case, Labour could quite easily have adopted a bi partisan approach to amending the RMA. Its problem was the fixation that anything National did was evil .

      Reply
      • This makes nonsense of councils being voted in by the residents.Why bother to have them if the Coal can just ignore them and the wishes of the people who live there?

        A village in the Waikato is having a new sub-division built which will really spoil its rural atmosphere. It’s a very small consolation to those whose views will be ruined that the new houses’ sections will flood in winter and the houses will be damp as the land is often under water.

        Reply
  3. artcroft

     /  November 25, 2018

    The question for HUDA in Auckland will be whether to build up or out? Both will be expensive but like Gezza says how do you force a council that can’t borrow any more funds to put in large stretches of motorway to service new and very distant subdivisions. Building up makes the Central Rail Loop work but you’d have to bulldoze lots of those old villas put up high rises and drop the sight line prohibitions. (Which HUDA might be able to force through) .

    Reply
    • David

       /  November 25, 2018

      They need to go out to greenfield sites and the government needs to provide the transport links, schools and infrastructure. The Auckland council have shown themselves to be totally inept so 60% of the rates from these areas should go back to the government for the first 10 years and then reduce the percentage over time as the council takes on responsibility for servicing these areas.
      Jones has a billion a year get him to invest and there is a ton of land surrounding Auckland just put in a green belt around the new areas and make them satellite towns.

      Reply
  4. PartisanZ

     /  November 25, 2018

    “It’s going to be a tooled-up agency that can cut through the red tape” – Minister Phil Twyford.

    I have to admit it’s not a good look adding another layer of bureaucracy rather than cutting through the red tape and reducing the existing encumbrances to create some form of fair play between market forces and regulation …

    Instead, corporate-political elitist oligarchy is trounced by corporate-political elitist dictatorship. In four words, how fucked-up is that?

    Aside from anything else it speaks to me of complete FIIRE economy dependence – a direct outcome of neoliberalism – with a distinct emphasis on Real Estate …

    Economic Real Estate Addiction … EREA …

    It speaks of governments both Red & Blue and parties Black, Green & Yellow utterly trapped in the paranoid fear and loathing of property prices falling … of ‘house & land’ commodity prices adjusting and stabilizing at a lower level than they sit today … of not having “economic growth” at any cost, of which property prices are a dubious measure to begin with …

    It speaks of the sickness at the very heart of (so-called) ‘capitalism’ – indeed, it is precisely capitalist arterial sclerosis – and the inability of (so-called) ‘socialism’ to remedy it.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 25, 2018

      That youtube video you posted a while back of the foreign dude speaking at some community seminar about how the government in Switzerland operates, with only about 20% of the federal tax take being spent by central government, and the rest being allocated to the Cantons to decide how it is to be spent, was very interesting. Often those spending decisions are devolved further to the cities and towns. I can’t recall if he covered housing issues but it’s a pity Sir Alan doesn’t watch videos as I think he might have found that very interesting. Essentially he was explaining how efficiently the money gets spent, because where there is wastage or mis-spending, and presumably lack of local accountability, businesses, people, and investment moves to the Canton and towns that spend it wisely.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  November 27, 2018

        Yes, one of the many victims of local body amalgamations has been the removal of competition to bad governance and the crestion and protection of incompetent monopolies.

        Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  November 25, 2018

    Vile socialism giving bureaucrats and politicians powers that belong to property owners. As usual, the Left’s solution to too much bureaucracy is more bureaucracy.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 25, 2018

      Interesting. Judith said that too. In the 2-second sound bite 1 ewes gave her last night, she said that in the first second, and then that it was a shame they didn’t just fix the RMA in the 2nd second. And that was her allotted 1ewes time all used up.

      Reply
  1. Phil Twyford on the new Housing and Urban Development Authority — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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