Pookie corner (aka general chat)

“Is there any way we could have a thread for the more lightweight stuff like music and general chat?”

Do it here. Please no personal attacks or bickering. Anything abusive, provocative or inflammatory may be deleted.

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8 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  November 25, 2018

    Elvira Longfin put in a brief appearance yesterday afternoon as I was coming up from feeding Granville Shortfin, but the earlier short period of rainfall was making the stream was rapidly get murky – and although I still had some eel food, so turned round, went back down to her regular feeding place Eel Spot, & put some food in the water on the end of the Eel Feeding Stick, after about 10 minutes she still hadn’t appeared & taken it. Nor had Granville. And it was soon too murky to see either of them anyway.

    They seem to know when there’s another eel in the water. Possibly she just came up to have an eel word with Granville about whose Eel Spot this is. I wonder if they’re like snakes & if Elvira has had so much food (she was getting pretty fat in the middle) she’s now going to spend a few days digesting it or just isn’t hungry again yet.

    I’m still waiting to get the video Money Shot of Elvira. It’s a tricky business trying to feed her, keep my balance on the uneven, grassy edge & and not fall in, & video her, all at the same time.

    She sometimes actually stands up in the water, in the deep water part of the Eel Spot, puts her head out, & begs. She’s done it several times for me & it’s quite something to see. She looks a bit like Flipper the dolphin. But it happens very briefly, & the lighting has to be right, at the right time of the day, & the stream has to be running very clear, & I have to have my camera ready or even running, to have any hope of getting a clear body & head shot of her doing this.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  November 25, 2018

      10.15 am on a sunny morning, like today, is the kind of perfect conditions I mean above. But only Granville showed up from upstream somewhere. Elvira must still be otherwise engaged. Granville must be doing regular circuits all day because there’s no way he could smell the eel food up-current.

      He did his best, but it’s not the cute begging performance Elvira puts on.

      Still, anyway, anyone who’s learning to like my eels can see what a cutie he is in this gif. I gotta shop and get down to ma’s now. Might post one of him feeding later.

      The other problem this wildlife cameraperson has is avoiding getting dog roll and meat chunk bits on the cellcam workings because I need one hand to hold the Feeding Stick, and one to put the food on it. I really should be getting sort of award for these videos probably. David bloody Attenborough has it easy – he’s not having to do all the bloody filming as well as yacking and smiling at the camera – is he?

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  November 25, 2018

        He’s lovely, almost bronze colour.

        If Elvira is getting fat around the middle, could she be ???

        More rain, so the bird breakfast was lunch again. I never know how they all know when it goes out. Mutt or Jeff was hanging around, but catch them spreading the word, the mean things.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  November 25, 2018

          Elvira can’t be preggers. I thought Big Ella was when she got really big last season, but she just went somewhere else for a few months and then returned this duckling season for a while. They migrate to the sea to breed.

          New Zealand longfins breed only once at the end of their lives, making a journey of thousands of kilometres from New Zealand to their spawning grounds near Tonga. Their eggs (of which each female eel produces between 1 and 20 million) are fertilized in an unknown manner, but probably in deep tropical water.The mature eels then die, their eggs floating to the surface to hatch into very flat leaf-like larvae (called leptocephalus) that then drift along large oceanic currents back to New Zealand.This drifting is thought to take up to 15 months. – Wikipedia.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  November 25, 2018

          Yesterday and today I have refused to feed Bluey or Sweety in my back yard & they are learning they have to jump down over the fence, streamside, for wheat or bread chunks. This is because they were separately hopping in to my yard for feed as they used to do, but then young Alex would wander along the fenceline, screaming his poor little head off, alone, vulnerable, missing out on the action, whatever it was, while the adults would be stupidly picking up grains for him and making the “come here” noise, oblivious to the fact that the gate was closed and he can’t jump the fence.

          He seems to be getting used to me at last. He won’t come near me at the fence on his own but he’ll happily eat below me if an adult is with him.

          I don’t want to open the gate and let him in because (a) the adults get all jumpy and ridiculous and noisy about what I’m doing, and (b) he gets up to mischief.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  November 25, 2018

          I got back from ma’s about 7.15 pm & as is the norm when I parked her car in the parking space outside my lounge (I have a separate internal garage for mine) & came through the front gate, Sweety peered around the corner of the house from where she had been waiting for me on the lawn. I told her to wait, let myself in from the patio, unpacked a couple of things for the fridge, heard Bluey and Alex from over the fence, so told her to join them, and then fed all three of them by name. Very cute scene, all quietly & busily eating together as a little family 3 feet below me.

          Then I just went back out with a coffee at 7.50 pm and all is quiet as the overcast sets in & the light is fading. It was a lovely, peaceful, scene. Alex was whistling contentedly somewhere, and Sweety flapped up into the foliage opposite and started walking around in it, pulling out carefully selected grasses and long-leafed plants and munching on their roots and leaves.

          And Granville swam into view and circled round, checking out the eel spot. A blackbird hen was busy picking through the cut grass at one end of the pook promenade and a single sparrow was hopping around below, looking for wheat grains the pooks might have missed.

          There was a very slight norwesterly breeze. I wouldn’t swap my place for anywhere else in the world at these moments.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  November 25, 2018

            I know what you mean ! I sometimes feel the same.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  November 25, 2018

              Your garden looks really nice mate. And your own artworks in it really add to its charm.

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