Victim focus from new family violence laws

Changes in the Family Violence Amendments Act emphasise the well being of victims in an attempt to reduce awful levels of family violence. This includes changes to the  Bail Act 2000 which makes the safety of victims the priority.

RNZ: New law aims to reduce family violence and put victims first

The new Family Violence Amendments Act will significantly improve the response to domestic violence, a domestic abuse organisation says.

The act aims to keep victims, including children, safe and reduce family violence. It also creates three new offences, including one of strangulation or suffocation, which carries a maximum sentence of seven years imprisonment.

The new legislation allows victims to give evidence via video recording made before the hearing. It also makes changes to the Bail Act 2000 by making the safety of the victim and their family the primary consideration when granting bail and imposing conditions.

Shine director Jane Drumm said the new legislation will help agencies and organisations deliver a unified approach to dealing with family violence.

“What they’re doing is they’re reflecting on all of the gaps that we’ve currently got and how we respond to family violence and they’re starting to mop those up,” Ms Drumm said.

“These amendments put the victim first. The challenge now will be ensuring these laws are enforced and supported by policies and procedures across a range of government agencies and service providers,” Ms Drumm said.

The safety of victims and potential victims should be the priority in dealing with family violence, but the rights of offenders and alleged offenders need to be protected as well (in a minority of cases allegations can be trumped up or overstated).

Green MP Jan Logie was interviewed about the changes on Q+A last night.

A focus here is changes to assault by strangulation or choking (it is horrendous what some people inflict on others).

Q+A Panel on new domestic violence legislation – & Meng Foon:

The Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill passed in July and starts to come into affect today.

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7 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  December 3, 2018

    one 1ewes they announced that the crime male assaults female is to be replaced with assault on a family member – to reflect the full truth & statistics about who is assaulting who in family situations. Good one Jan Logie

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 3, 2018

      Photographed on wall in corridor at Wellington Hospital during a visit

      Reply
  2. Pink David

     /  December 3, 2018

    I notice Golriz Ghahraman again taking out the gold for victim status in The Guardian.

    “A New Zealand MP has spoken of an abusive relationship in which her partner attempted to strangle her, and welcomed parliament passing legislation tackling domestic violence……..Greens MP Golriz Ghahraman was trapped in a violent relationship and escaped only after changing her phone number and address, and with the support of friends.”

    You would think she would be very keen to see this man charged to make sure he does not abuse others, yet, strangely, this has not happened. She has had an eventful like, first a refugee, then escaping abusive relationships all while defending war criminals. Quite a remarkable mixture.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/03/new-zealand-mp-speaks-of-abuse-ordeal-as-new-laws-tackle-strangulation-attacks

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 3, 2018

      Given her well demonstrated capacity to fantasize and over-hype her background & experience I’ll take a pass on whether I believe her or not. I’d like to hear the story from her alleged assailant’s viewpoint before accepting this lady’s tales as true.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  December 3, 2018

        The sad thing is she seems to have a compelling story without making such claims. Nor does it help when she, a lawyer, makes these statements;

        What on earth is “an atrocity crime”

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  December 3, 2018

        Possibly tried to strangle himself first? Who knows with this attention-seeker.

        Reply

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