2018 Child Poverty Monitor

When becoming Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said that dealing with child poverty would be a priority for her and her Government.  However there are no easy or quick fixes – yet at least.

 

Click here for the Child Poverty Monitor: 2018 Technical Report

20 Comments

  1. PDB

     /  10th December 2018

    Stuff: “The Monitor, released on Monday morning, said there was no new data on child poverty in New Zealand, but it put a “spotlight on critical areas”.

    “Data quality issues in 2018 meant that the Child Poverty Monitor – a gauge of the extent of child poverty in New Zealand – meant the data could not be reported on.
    “This is frustrating because it doesn’t allow us to update the sequence of measures we’ve provided for the last five years,” Becroft said.”

    “The Government had funded Stats NZ to provide a much larger sample and made other improvements to ensure that future child poverty statistics were robust and able to be used in relation to the requirements of the Child Poverty Reduction Bill, he said.”

  2. Ray

     /  10th December 2018

    So we don’t have any up to date figures because “quality issues” ie the results didn’t jell with what we believe or the vibe in the street?
    It seems this the current Governments default position and makes it awfully easy to claim just about anything.

  3. The Consultant

     /  10th December 2018

    The Smart Technocats And Benevolent Dictators Always Fail:

    Top down solutions to big problems don’t work. In fact, when it comes to stamping out poverty, the top down solution becomes an excuse for technocrats, bureaucrats, the smart people, the elites and “benevolent dictators” to keep trampling upon the poor all the while making themselves feel good and important.

    The article focuses mainly on an economist named Bill Easterly and his recent book, The Tyranny of Experts.

    There’s also this interview with him where he’s asked about the efforts in dealing with poverty in foreign countries, Bill Gates’ least favorite aid expert, but the critiques apply equally to domestic poverty programs.

    All very interesting but it’s largely him vs. bureacratic inertia.

  4. The Consultant

     /  10th December 2018

    Wierd how the US poverty rate kept dropping through 1965, continued to drop for about eight years after LBJ’s gigantic War On Poverty programs began – then began to rise and have averaged around 14% ever since.

    It’s almost as if the tens of trillions of dollars spent by The Great Society programs of the last fifty years, have had no positive effect on poverty. It’s like looking at The War On Drugs.

  5. David

     /  10th December 2018

    Get a bloody job there are plenty out there in fact so many we are having to import workers to plant Jones,s trees if he ever gets round to it because the locals are all too busy.
    Stop having children if you cant afford them given its 2018 and long term contraception is safe, reliable and free.
    If you do have children be in a stable long term relationship because the outcomes are so much better than doing it at random and by yourself.
    Move out of Auckland/Northland/Gisborne your outcome in life will be so much better.

  6. artcroft

     /  10th December 2018

    You can provided incredibly expensive wrap around services to many of the poorest but it will make no difference to outcomes. Its poverty of spirit, not poverty of means that’s the problem.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  10th December 2018

      Your wealth or poverty is largely between your ears. Some people epitomise that here. They have a wealth of knowledge, interests and skills that enrich their lives despite little material wealth. Other people’s lives are an impoverished mess despite plenty of money.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  10th December 2018

        The first Lotto millionaire had nothing left 12 months later, and being a millionaire then was a big thing (I knew someone who knew him; he just blew it) And someone who won $600,00+ a few years ago deliberately squandered it so that he could keep his sickness benefit which was much less than the interest on the money would have been.

        The miners who had the large redundancy payout were divided between those who bought or paid off houses and those who bought cars and expensive holidays.