Open Forum – Tuesday

18 December 2018

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54 Comments

  1. Gerrit

     /  18th December 2018

    Wonder how the tax working group and ultimately Labour will get around Maori wanting exceptions to paying Capital Gains Tax due to the treaty of Waitangi.

    That is one big hurdle to overcome. Scrap the tax or grant separate taxation regimes based on race privilege.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/109421304/treaty-claims-could-be-the-straw-that-breaks-the-back-of-capital-gains-tax

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  18th December 2018

      Whats your guess on how Peters would react to that .
      You keep forgetting , its one groups proposals to a Working group, who may not like and if they did a coalition government may not like it either.
      Sector groups have weird ideas about tax all the time, farmers, fishing etc

      Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  18th December 2018

    It’s tuff at the top
    Soper:
    Salary-wise, Jacinda Ardern doesn’t come within cooee of the boss at ACC, who’s on well over $800,000 a year – and he’s not alone at that level of remuneration.

    There’s one appointment she’s just made to a top public service role though who’ll earn a good deal more than her, but who could earn even more in the private sector. That’s the Chief Justice’s job which has gone to 56-year-old Helen Winkelmann who’ll now be cushioned for the rest of her career to ensure she doesn’t have to think about what they’re earning on the outside.

    We’re told a Queen’s Counsel can expect to rake in more than a million a year.

    Dame Sian Elias, the current Chief Justice, has been in the job for almost 20 years and will leave her Supreme Court office next March as a very wealthy woman, not that she isn’t already.

    The taxpayer cushion provided to judges is gold-plated, like no other super scheme. They’re allowed to contribute up to 5 per cent of their salary, which is topped up by the taxpayer by a staggering $7.50 for each dollar they contribute.

    It means the money Elias may have contributed over the years could see her walking away with subsidies close to $3 million. But that’s conservative with the Herald on Sunday predicting she could retire with $6.5m in the bank.

    Several years back Andrew Little, who’s now Justice Minister, described the judicial super as one of the most generous he’s ever heard of. Not surprising considering the MPs get a piddling $2.50 for each dollar they invest.

    But of course the politicians can’t interfere with the judiciary’s pay and conditions, it’s called judicial independence and it means they’re a law unto themselves.

    The moral to the story is, law is the vocation to follow.
    More…
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12178482

    Reply
    • David

       /  18th December 2018

      Good work if you can get it and she runs arguably the slowest commercial justice system in the developed world. NZ has such a reputation that basically everyone settles out of court and therefore there are very few rulings to base anything on.
      Anyway I am shocked she has been replaced by another woman, we have a woman PM, governor general and chief justice and the inequality is glaring, how are men supposed to be heard in this #metoo era with no role models to aspire to because the matriarchy has them all sown up.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th December 2018

        Not only are they slow but they’re so bad people keep getting their decisions overturned on appeals.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  18th December 2018

          really ? I saw Talleys lose the same case for the third time last week. No overturning

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  18th December 2018

            You can’t base your overall assessment on one or two cases where some judge got lucky the first time >:D

            Reply
          • David

             /  18th December 2018

            What case ? Some government department enforcing something or other no doubt or some stroppy pommy unionist wasting his members cash on lawyers.

            Reply
  3. David

     /  18th December 2018

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/109423336/govt-raises-price-caps-for-homestart-grants-and-lowdeposit-loans-outside-of-auckland

    The Twyford debacle continues its morphing into a branch of Harcourts as rather than doing something about the escalation in building costs and land or actually building a house himself he has been forced to up the price he pays to developers for their spec homes and ensure there is a margin for them.
    With the lift in the cap in the regions to a price way above the median for a typical first home one has to question if the whole thing should be shut down.
    He was supposed to ramp up supply, hasnt happened. He was supposed to encourage the market to build a load more starter homes, he hasnt. He was supposed to help struggling FHBs but the only ones who can afford his stock are the wealthy who could easily afford to buy anyway.
    What Twyford is actually doing is making things worse, who thought we could find someone worse than Nick Smith.

    Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  18th December 2018

    The wellbeing budget idea
    Editorial:
    A “wellbeing” approach to budgeting has been under study by the Treasury for many years but clearly did not excite the previous Government. It does excite this one. In essence it means economic growth will not be the most important measure of the 2019 budget, it will be just one of several measures of national progress. Of equal importance will be indicators such as child poverty reduction, inequality and climate change.

    Delivering this philosophy last Thursday in its Budget Policy Statement 2019, the Treasury said, “Recent history shows that too narrow a focus on economic growth can be associated with negative outcomes such as growing income inequality and economic degradation.”
    More…
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12178347

    So it’s not just some off-the -wall idea of Labour’s. But it needs sustained economic growth, the editorial says.

    Reply
  5. David

     /  18th December 2018

    “Jeremy Corbyn has tabled a vote of no confidence in Theresa May, as he accused the Prime Minister of “cynically running down the clock” towards the Brexit deadline.

    Mr Corbyn put forward the motion after claiming Mrs May had forced the UK to face two unacceptable choices: leaving the EU with her flawed deal or with no deal it all.”

    I hope she loses and is turfed out, most inept PM the poms have had since Heath. The Tories bottled it last week with the inevitable to come as she is wedded to her horrid Brexit plan, she cant negotiate and she never listens. I think she has some mental health problem and is under the delusion that being stoic against all sensible advice is somehow a virtue and a quality.

    Reply
  6. robertguyton

     /  18th December 2018

    National under-funded the Census.
    https://www.pundit.co.nz/content/the-census-flop

    Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  18th December 2018

        I just got that too from Chrome on Android. Rebooted no change. Switched from wifi to mobile data and it’s working again.

        Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  18th December 2018

      No, they overfunded it. The census is a waste of time and money. Most of the data is worthless and all of it is late and inaccurate. The less politicians and bureaucrats think they know, the better.

      Reply
  7. kluelis

     /  18th December 2018

    All our politicians are doing a great job…well the best they can so can y’all just stop moaning.

    Reply
  8. lurcher1948

     /  18th December 2018

    Spare Wellington HDPA is giggling because a female fractured her neck riding a lime scooter.I can see NZME saying HDPA is really stupid,who can we inflict her on….i know

    Reply
  9. PDB

     /  18th December 2018

    If anybody was still in any doubt over who was really running the country…

    Reply
  10. lurcher1948

     /  18th December 2018

    In the ancient days Knights were brave people who fought for the people and country, AND WERE STUNCH, nowadays they are RICH moneymarket dealers who get a knighthood for running away to make money for another country, standards have slipped,

    Reply
  11. lurcher1948

     /  18th December 2018

    There are brave knights there but lets remove the money market leechers, and get the brave plebs who work hard, there are so many out not cowards like key

    Reply
  12. lurcher1948

     /  18th December 2018

    Thompson and Clark and,the NATIONAL PARTY and Sir Key, a bunch of arseholes deserving each other, gone forever unless the tempory leader of the opposition the soon to be shafted simon bridges has a brain fart,

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  18th December 2018

      The Sir Key is stale and tired.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th December 2018

        Personally I quite like it. Some of Lurch’s little idiosyncrasies, epithets and nasty nicknames I’ve come to find quite amusing, even rather endearing. He must be a hoot in a bar, dodging punches …

        Reply
  13. lurcher1948

     /  18th December 2018

    What do you call an Irish man holding the Rugby World Cup???……. ….. The engraver !!!!! 🖕🏼🖕🏼

    Reply
  14. Kitty Catkin

     /  18th December 2018

    Two idiots mixing chemicals for huffing and blowing themselves up might be a bit short of sympathy….

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  18th December 2018

      Wot?

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  18th December 2018

        3 News, I missed a little bit at the beginning, but it seemed that they were huffing and it went badly wrong…I have turned it on to +1, but the ads are interminable…ANOTHER ONE !!! Dies waiting.

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  18th December 2018

        HNZ block…put the fear of God into the other residents. They were 15 and 17, living alone under the aegis of something with a name like Lifeline, but of course it isn’t that. They have caused a lot of trouble and the boys in blue are frequent visitors. The organisation has an office upstairs.

        I didn’t realise that they were critically and seriously injured when the chemicals caused a flash fire; I missed that bit.

        Reply
  15. PartisanZ

     /  18th December 2018

    Gone to the dogs?
    Very sad and angry to hear about Kaikohe’s 95 y.o. Jim Morgan losing his dog Sandy in their fourth pack-dog attack. I’m not surprised though, unfortunately.
    A series of somewhat necrotic ‘exchanges’ between corporate-political elites and the people of Aotearoa New Zealand occurred during the 1980s and 90s while neoliberal economic policies were being imposed upon us. In return for our compliance, and often complicity, we ‘Kiwis’ were granted a raft of carefully orchestrated foreign policy decisions, ‘social justice’ and so-called ‘individual freedom’ legislation. These popular, progressive ‘advances’ inversely mirrored our political transition from ‘the social contract’ to legitimized or ‘contract’ corruption and consultantocracy.
    Nuclear-free and ‘Civil Union’ law reform are two of the best known of these quasi-democratic pay-offs: Timely and socially necessary but nonetheless conscience-salve for politicians flying beneath the ethics radar elsewhere.
    One of the very worst of individual freedoms bestowed upon us from on-high was permission to own and breed a variety of vicious, hitherto banned attack dogs.
    Neoliberalism, characterized by the ‘free market’, espouses individual freedom with minimum social responsibility. The ‘Pit Bull’ mentality of relaxed dog ownership perfectly reflected the ‘New Right’ dog-eat-dog economic paradigm. The often horrific, ongoing consequences of both are case-studies in lack of personal and communal obligation.
    It’s so ‘embedded’ today we don’t even notice. A daily dog attack ‘toll’ we rarely even hear about. From 2001 to 2017 in Far North District alone ACC claims for dog-related injuries rose steeply from 44 to 348. 359 in 2015! From 8,353 to 14,026 for the whole country: 39 per day.
    Neoliberalism’s hidden agenda proved to be “Privatize the profits [or gains]: Socialize the losses”. Every day our emergency services, doctors, nurses, vets and dog control personnel do exactly the latter on behalf of irresponsible lawmakers who ‘deregulated’ dangerous and malicious dog breeds, and feckless owners – vested with their cherished personal freedom – whose animals harass, attack and maul people – often children and the elderly – along with pets and livestock. How many attacks and near-misses go unreported?
    There’s profits aplenty for breeders, but it’s difficult to see what the “gains” are.
    To what purpose these dogs? To protect our houses – formerly homes – a dwindling proportion of which we ever own – our treasured ‘private property’ – that nowadays have two metre high fences all-around them anyhow, often in conjunction with security alarm systems and CCTV.
    Dogs to protect our selves? From whom? From our neighbours? The ones we lost in a series of somewhat necrotic exchanges back in the 1980s and 90s …
    Pit Bull substitutes for Social Security.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  18th December 2018

      The people who own pit bulls, pit bull crosses and other vicious dogs around here certainly aren’t neoliberals.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  19th December 2018

        Pathetic … If you can’t see that I’m using neoliberalism analogously you’re an idiot Gezza …

        People didn’t need to know what neoliberalism was to ‘buy into’ its so-called ‘freedoms’ … its instant gratification and ‘comfort’ …

        As their pay decreased they were driven to buy at the Warehouse and the $2 Shop, accepting poorer quality overseas manufactures without thinking that every purchase destroyed a local manufacturing job …

        Dog-attack statistics speak volumes about a correlation between Rogered-nomics and Ruthanasia, growing numbers of dangerous and malicious breeds and cross-breeds, and diminishing owner responsibility …

        I’m offering a partisan view of why …

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  19th December 2018

          Pathetic … If you can’t see that I’m using neoliberalism analogously you’re an idiot Gezza …

          I am an idiot for reading through that pile of tortured shite. But if I’m an idiot, that was written by a raving lunatic.

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  19th December 2018

            I grant you it was written in too much haste and heat …

            I have to remember I’ve seen the consequences first-hand … but that only makes me want to rewrite it with a cooler head …

            People who think that prevailing political ideologies do not have an affect on public behaviour and personal behaviour in public are ‘turn a blind eye’ stupid IMHO …

            The phenomenon of teen ‘binge drinking’ began with when Douglas rogered those teens parents as well … and we allowed him to … that kinda thing …

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  19th December 2018

              The phenomenon of teen binge drinking was so common when I was 16 me and the others would drive out to Paddy’s place in Waitara every Friday night with one dozen full size bottles of beer (Taranaki Ale was the cheapest) EACH and try to drink the lot that night. If we couldn’t manage to do that because we were chundering too much and breaking things in his bachelor pad or just plain going off to sleep or falling over we’d finish whatever was left on Saturday night and top up with more from the bottle store. His mum would offer to make us breakfast in the morning but most of us couldn’t face it.

              This was quite normal for teen boys we knew back then.

            • PartisanZ

               /  19th December 2018

              So you were a part of the kind of thing we see on TV in Queen Street and main streets around NZ every Fri & Sat nights, were you?

              Or virtual riots with major police presence as seen at parties around the country?

              I know there was a drinking culture among teens back then, I was part of it too … but there’s a difference … and the difference is pre-and-post neoliberalism …

            • Gezza

               /  19th December 2018

              The difference I see with the folk on Main Street is there are more of them because the population has grown & many are younger becos their parents don’t know or don’t care where they are.

              It’s too easy to get booze now – yes. But there are too many parents teaching their kids to drink the bloody stuff. Neoliberalism is not responsible for every ill in our society, like neither is past colonialism. Much of it is down to piss poor parenting, some of which is a legacy of the “sexual revolution” of our day and the anything goes approach that came out of our generation.

              There are other factors as well. And the vicious dog situation is a different matter altogether but has bugger all to do with neoliberalism and more to do with arseholes who want to own them and arrogant owners who just believe “my dog’s never given me any trouble he’s wonderful with kids” because they’re such great dog trainers.

    • Gerrit

       /  19th December 2018

      All that dialog to prove dog attacks can be blamed on neo liberal policies.

      I guess squirrel sightings will be blamed on neo liberal policies as well?

      What dog breeds were outlawed prior to Roger Douglas and able to be introduced after his neo liberal policies were enacted?

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  19th December 2018

        There is indeed a great deal that can be blamed on neoliberal policies Gerrit … because the prevailing ideology ‘sets the scene’ and significantly influences the collective psyche … that’s why it took so many years to indoctrinate us into it … all those TV commercials and all that ‘spin’ …

        Okay, I got the “hitherto banned” part wrong …

        Should read ” … one of the worst was the permissive encouragement to own and breed …”

        The whole neoliberal ideological malaise is contained in this issue.

        It can’t be a problem, it hasn’t happened to “ME”!

        But wait … “other people’s money” is paying for children to have their faces sewn back on … but not “MY” child …

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  19th December 2018

          “The German state of Lower Saxony has provided a valuable lead on how an owner licensing system can operate without unreasonably ensnaring responsible people. Licensing of dog owners is not about being anti-dog or curtailing enjoyment of owning and keeping a dog.

          Rather, it recognises that like vehicles and firearms, dogs can attack and kill if placed with the wrong person. Hopefully, New Zealand will not have to endure the anguish and horror of a child being killed by a dog, before it comes to the realisation that current dog control legislation does not provide adequate protection to the public from the dangers posed by dogs not under effective control.”

          https://www.otago.ac.nz/law/research/journals/otago065275.pdf

          Reply

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