World view – Sunday

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For posting on events, news, opinions and anything of interest from around the world.

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28 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  December 30, 2018

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  December 30, 2018

      Bahahahaha!

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  December 30, 2018

        Next they’ll be telling us the two damaged drones they found (which have been ruled out as culprits) were their own they had shot down or crashed.

        Their incompetence is unbelievable. Never mind. They are sorry for the couple they held under arrest for 36 hours while they refused to hear from the guy’s boss who was telling them he couldn’t have been involved as he was working on a job with two workmates miles away the whole time. What a bunch of idiots.

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  December 30, 2018

      😄😄😄

      Reply
  2. Missy

     /  December 30, 2018

    There is trouble in (EU) paradise.

    A day or two ago the EU Commission announced they would overlook ‘this once’ France going over the maximum deficit for Eurozone countries. This is despite threatening Italy with large fines for doing the same thing. Also, many have pointed out on Social Media that this will not be the first time France has exceeded the maximum deficit of 3%. This will cause some tensions in the EU if they show favouritism to one country over other member states, especially as they have continually told Britain the rules cannot be bent for them as all member states must conform to the rules. Yet another case of the EU’s hypocrisy and double standards.

    Today, for the seventh week in a row, the Yellow Vest protests occurred in France as pressure mounts on Macron to resign. The media are reporting that momentum for the movement may be waning as less people turned out today, however, this could just be because it is right in the middle of the Christmas / New Year holiday period and people are away.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 30, 2018

      Aljazeera tv has noted shrinking turnouts for protests ever since the height of the protests (which Aljazeera noted quite early on from interviews with yellow-vesters eventually went well beyond being over just petrol prices) & Macron panicked & capitulated on what appeared to be quite a number of diverse demands. He may have got away with heeding the very clear warnings that if he didn’t, he was a goner.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  December 30, 2018

      Anyone who thinks France will abide by any inconvenient rule is sadly deluded.

      Reply
  3. Missy

     /  December 30, 2018

    Unlike in NZ the New Year’s honours list in the UK is announced a couple of days before New Year’s Day. Today the list was released, and of the list of a lot of people I have never heard of, it is congratulations to Sir Michael Palin and Dame Twiggy (though I imagine she will officially be Dame Lesley Lawson).

    Gareth Southgate received an OBE for services to football, though personally I think it should be services to fashion as (if only briefly) he did inspire many British men to dress a little bit nicer over the summer. Though why a coach of a team that didn’t even make the semis in the World Cup gets honoured is beyond me, though it does illustrate how dire England have been that they see it as a victory.

    For Downton fans it is nice to see Carson (actor Jim Carter) get an OBE.

    And for the most deserving honour, two of the British cave divers who rescued the Thai Schoolboys have been awarded the George Medal, the second highest medal for gallantry for civilians, and three others have been awarded an MBE.

    One of the most talked about omissions is the lack of a dame hood for the former head of Crown Prosecution Service, a departure from her predecessors, after a number of failed rape cases in which the prosecution failed to investigate properly or disclose evidence that proved the innocence of the accused. It is unclear as to whether she refused or was snubbed.

    Notable people to miss out were Gary Linekar, David Beckham, Robbie Williams, Wayne Rooney and Rio Ferdinand. This is believed to be due to them having poor tax behaviour after a HMRC memo leaked earlier this year indicating this would be a barrier to gaining an honour. Essentially anyone engaging in tax avoidance will be excluded. This is believed by many to be the reason David Beckham has not received a knighthood.

    Reply
    • kluelis

       /  December 30, 2018

      @Missy. England did make the semis of the World Cup… got beat by Croatia 2-1. And Liverpool won this morning beating Arsenal 5-1. But your a woman so I do not expect you to know much about sport except what clothes the players or managers wear or what they call their children 🙂

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  December 30, 2018

        It is my error, but there is no reason for the incredibly sexist and condescending remark at the end. Football isn’t my sport I admit, but just because I am a woman it does not mean I don’t follow some sports.

        You should apologise for your sexism it is uncalled for.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  December 30, 2018

          I think kluelis might be trying to make a point with sarcasm after her(?) comments yesterday, Missy.

          Reply
        • kluelis

           /  December 31, 2018

          Only if you apoligise for your incredible condescending remark about the English football team and judging great athletes by the clothes they wear. You should apologise for your sexism it is uncalled for.

          Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  December 30, 2018

    to serve is its own reward…apparently.

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  5. Missy

     /  December 30, 2018

    Reply
  6. Gezza

     /  December 30, 2018

    Baltimore police begin cash-for-guns campaign to check violence
    Police hope to curb gun violence in a city where more than 300 people have been killed in each of the past four years.

    This short video clip is interesting. I don’t expect it will change much. From what I could see I wondered many people were just handing in broken firearms for cash they might just use to buy working ones.
    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/12/baltimore-police-cash-for-guns-campaign-check-violence-181227112523264.html

    Reply
    • The Consultant

       /  December 30, 2018

      Baltimore police begin cash-for-guns campaign to check violence…
      Of course. Another useless gesture by another useless US city government.

      In fact the crime rate, and in particular the murder rate, have soared in Baltimore for entirely predicatable and controllable reasons, almost all of them stemming from the outrage generated by the death of Freddy Grey while in police custody in 2015.

      Immediately following that death, people started rioting, and the mayor pulled the police back from trying to stop it, making the incredible comment that she had told the police to give “those who wished to destroy, space to do that.”.

      She and the rest of the local politicians then brought baseless charges against officers involved in the Gray incident, only for an African-American judge to find each of the defendants whose cases he decided “not guilty” on all counts.

      As if that were not enough, the Obama Justice Department then got stuck in, accusing the Baltimore police of a pattern of violating blacks’ civil rights. The methodology for reaching that conclusion is the (by now) standard of saying that because Blacks are stopped and arrested by the Baltimore police at a higher rate than their representation in the Baltimore population, the police were guilty of racial bias. But Blacks are also the overwhelming proportion – like more than 80% – of crime victims in the city.

      Not surprisingly, officers became passive in enforcing any laws (a tale repeated in Chicago for the same reasons), simply waiting for calls to attend a crime. Morale plummeted, and the police force shrank as cops quit or retired early and were not replaced – because who the hell would want to be cop in that situation?

      The result, as reported by The Washington Post:

      Baltimore has seen a stunning surge of violence, with nearly a killing each day for the past three years in a city of 600,000. . . .

      Baltimore is also one of 30 cities that have seen an increase in homicides in recent years, with the greatest raw number increase in killings of any city other than Chicago, which has four times the population. . . .

      The wave of violence here began not long after the April 2015 death of Freddie Gray. . .“It’s an open market, open season for killing,” said Daphne Alston [a co-founder of Mothers of Murdered Sons and Daughters United], whose son Tariq was murdered in 2008. “After Freddie Gray, things just went berserk.”

      No, arsehole politicians went beserk.

      For most of the decade before 2015, Baltimore’s annual homicide arrest rate hovered at about 40 percent. Since 2015, the arrest rate hasn’t topped 30 percent in any year. And while most cities saw their arrest rates drop gradually, Baltimore’s decline was sudden — plummeting 15 percentage points in 2015, after Gray’s death, the largest single-year drop for any city already solving less than half its homicides.

      And that’s just arrests. Given the general atmosphere I’d bet the conviction rate for those arrests has also dropped a lot. What a fucking surprise. A depleted, demoralized police force that’s under concerted assault and demonized by local politicians and the federal government is going to receive less help from residents and will struggle to solve crimes, especially when crime is increasing.

      And that’s also when you get farcical non-solutions like “cash-for-guns”.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  December 30, 2018

        Baltimore, like most democrat run cities, is exactly what the democrat’s want it to be. Black communities are systematically under-policed, and the governments allow those communities to be the perpetual victims of crime and a criminal underclass.

        Everything then gets blamed on whitey, and the votes roll in. It’s a nice little machine they have running and it won’t be changing any time soon.

        Reply
    • The Consultant

       /  December 30, 2018

      It’s probably time for the Baltimore moron politicians to re-read the classic article on reducing crime, Broken Windows, The police and neighborhood safety – The Atlantic March 1982.

      “If a window in a building is broken and is left unrepaired,” they wrote, “all the rest of the windows will soon be broken.” Broken windows are “a signal that no one cares”—an emboldening message for those who would commit serious crimes.

      It sounded – and still sounds to some ears – too simplistic to be true, but there’s an interesting look at the two scholars who wrote that hugely influential piece, George Kelling and James Wilson (Wilson died in 2012 but Kelling is still going strong.), which clarifies a number of things about the theory:

      Meanwhile, Wilson in 1975 published “Thinking About Crime,” a book challenging the prevailing idea that dealing with “root causes,” such as poverty and racial bias, was a necessary prerequisite for reducing crime.

      I think that’s still the prevailing theory – at least it is every time I talk to a Lefty about crime.

      “This is a period,” Mr. Kelling notes, “when nothing seemed to work, and almost everyone had given up on the idea police could really do anything about crime.” Policing tended to be reactive: Officers would wait for a crime to happen, then try to catch the perpetrator. Broken-windows policing focused on preventing crime by maintaining public order, giving cops (and other authority figures) more discretion about how to go about it.

      Discretion? Individual judgement? Not more prescriptive, centralised control? That’s always going to make people nervous: they trust themselves, but not others!

      Mr. Kelling and Wilson based their ideas on conversations with residents of troubled neighborhoods. Somewhat to their surprise, they found the residents seldom listed violence as their worst problem. What they complained about most was everyday assaults on the civilized order: men urinating on their front porches, prostitutes soliciting on street corners, open-air drug dealing, vagrants sleeping in parks and transit stations, aggressive panhandling and so on.

      Mr. Kelling found that law-abiding residents of troubled neighborhoods were anxious for a robust police presence and aggrieved at the incivility and indignity they had to endure. And why shouldn’t they be? If the idea of focusing on minor infractions to reduce serious crimes seems radical, consider that it’s what police in low-crime suburbs do more or less by default. When I mention my New Jersey hometown, Mr. Kelling dryly notes: “You don’t worry about people peeing on your front steps in Madison.”

      But you do see it now in San Francisco, and for the same stupid, lessons-never-learned reason of dopey Lefty politicians being “kind-hearted” to the oppressed and the down-and-out. And it’s dollars-to-donuts that they have not really talked to people in those areas.

      Mr. Kelling says one problem is that his critics often don’t understand what broken-windows policing is. Some complain that it makes criminals of young African-American men over minor infractions. Others conflate it with tactical approaches such as “zero tolerance” or “stop and frisk.”

      “Broken Windows isn’t one-size-fits all, and it isn’t about increasing arrests,” Mr. Kelling says. “It’s about maintaining order and giving police more discretion.” It entails adapting to local conditions: What works in the South Bronx may not work in East Los Angeles—or even in East New York, a Brooklyn neighborhood. To figure out what works, beat cops constantly listen to citizens in the communities they police.

      San Francisco, Chicago and Baltimore are not listening to this. New York has, which is why it’s one of the safest giant cities in the world, but DeBlasio has been steadily rolling back all this, so we’ll see what happens there with crime in the next few years, as it seems to take about half-a-decade to see the results either way.

      Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  December 30, 2018

    A revealing look at the politicisation of justice in the USA:
    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/12/25/on-the-basis-of-sex-review-rbg-223557

    The writer’s partisan blinkers do allow enough side vision to spot some of the elephants in the room.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 31, 2018

      FFS Al. It’s a glorified, rambling, movie review. The only thing worthy of note in that whole screed is:

      Trump’s populist attacks on government institutions hit liberals on two levels. The nakedness of his desire to score victories on everything from Obamacare to abortion rights makes some liberals eager to respond in kind, to match their identity politics against his, their scorched-earth tactics against his. Those who’ve been agitating for a fight may even welcome Trump’s willingness to turn every agency from the Federal Reserve to the Supreme Court to the Justice Department to the CIA into a playing field for partisan politics.

      But it’s on the second level—the assault on the integrity of American institutions, the breaking of boundaries that have been honored for decades—that Trump threatens to have his most lasting impact.

      Liberals, who have spent decades questioning some of those same agencies and trying to scrub them of bias, should understand that Trump’s critique is different from theirs. They’re trying to purify the institutions; he’s trying to discredit them, creating a void he can fill with his own judgments.

      Reply
  8. Blazer

     /  December 30, 2018

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  December 30, 2018

      Fatuous in a democracy that changes government regularly and peacefully.

      Reply

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