More on decolonisation

Yesterday’s post on decolonisation was a popular topic to discuss. It also fed discussions in a number of other forums:

There was also a discussion at Kiwiblog from here but you may not be able to see it – it ended up in moderation and is currently still hidden there.

I still have no clear idea what decolonisation actually means for New Zealand. It appears to be promoted by a small number of people, and the discussions yesterday showed not a lot of support for it.

One person at The Standard took a ‘shut up and listen’ approach, suggesting that I (and by implication the others who thought it a worthwhile discussion to have) should leave it to some Māori only to talk about it.

Sacha:

“‘Decolonisation’ sounds to me like going backwards.”

I’m confident today’s Māori leaders will accord your opinion all the respect it deserves.

I would rather hear their thoughts on matters like this, in the spirit of contra proferentem that applies to interpreting colonial treaties.

So perhaps he should go and listen to who he prefers to listen to rather than dump on a popular discussion.

I think that all New Zealanders should be free to interpret our ‘colonial treaty’ – it impacts on all of us, and I don’t think it was ever intended to be the sole domain of some.

More from Sacha:

“I don’t think the colonial nor the Maori ways of dealing with power and class and equality are appropriate in the modern world.”

Your personal beliefs are noted, again. This may not be the thread you think it is – what are your practical suggestions or approaches, not your opinions?

Me:

What are your what are your practical suggestions or approaches? You haven’t addressed them yet after how many comments.

Sacha avoided answering that, continuing with his attempt to diss discussion.

When someone turns up lobbing loaded phrases like “We are more or less ‘one people’” without any provocation, you bet resisting harmful framing takes priority over any ideas I as Pakeha may have about how to proceed. Brash and chums do not need any help.

As you wrote on your own blog:

“Decolonisation can’t mean going back to how things were pre-colonisation, that is impossible. So it must mean a reassessment of many things in relation to power, money, race and gender. [Following quote from Jessica Hutchings: Decolonisation and Aotearoa – a pathway to right livelihood:]

“I believe decolonisation is opening the minds of many Maori and non-Maori in understanding both a truer history of this country and generating new tools to create a more meaningful process of reflection and dialogue.

For non-Maori people, part of participating in decolonisation processes is about recognising their role as belonging to the dominant colonial grouping.”

I have no idea what this means.

Yet that did not cause you any pause for thought, did it.

Read it again. Then resist the desire to flap those gums for a moment or two longer. Better still, take the rest of the year off and open your ears instead.

A ‘shut up and listen’ on top of his wanting to here selected views only on the topic.

RedLogix joined the thread:

@Sacha

Fine … I’m interested as well. I’ve no clear sense of what’s meant by ‘decolonisation’ either; it’s one of those chameleon words that seems to change shape a lot depending on who you listen to.

So without prejudice I’m genuinely curious to know exactly what you mean by it, and what implications you think this would have both constitutionally (in the broadest sense) and in ordinary people’s lives?

Sacha continued to comment on trivial side issues, but never answered this (and didn’t tell RedLogix to shut up and listen to who Sacha respected only.

Fortunately this negative approach to the discussion along with avoiding giving any of his own views was the exception.

The issue of decolonisation may or may not become any more than a fringe thing, but if those who think that it is something that needs to be pursued then as wide a discussion on it as possible should be encouraged.

Leave a comment

88 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  January 7, 2019

    Follow the money if you want to know what it means and if indeed it means anything.

    Reply
  2. Griff.

     /  January 7, 2019

    Decolonization is nothing more than a power grab by a bunch of far left nutters.
    What decolonization means to its supporters is they get the power to subjugate the majority.

    The Maori elite happy to go along with the rhetoric as it directly benefits them .
    Maori as a group would end up worse off.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 7, 2019

      “CHARGE!!!” ….click … click … click click click click click …

      “The story of the “Māori tribal elite” is a fiction generated by those allied – consciously or unconsciously – to an enduring colonial project that insists on subverting the place of Māori in our ancestral lands of Aotearoa.

      The Māori tribal elite. Ruminate on that phrase for a moment. A combination of words expunged of context. It erases the lived experiences of Māori in a colonised society, as if our cultural, political and economic renaissance in a system that was militantly thrust upon our tīpuna was delivered to us without struggle through the goodwill of our bleeding heart colonisers. Where iwi rangatira are excluded as products of colonisation because they have come to occupy roles that give them access to influence and power.”

      https://thespinoff.co.nz/politics/19-04-2017/the-phrase-maori-tribal-elite-really-tells-you-something-about-the-person-using-it/

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  January 7, 2019

        Tell the ordinary Joe Tainui that the tribal elite expression tells you something about the person using it. There are a few families who are the elite; I won’t name them, although I know who they are. The rest are no better off than they were before.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  January 7, 2019

        … an elitist apologist speaks.

        Reply
      • Trevors_elbow

         /  January 7, 2019

        Tuku Morgan, the Tirikatenes, The Mairi King, the Mahutas… and don’t forget Steve/Tipene O’ Regan, the Loves of Wellington…..plus a nice cadre of lawyers and researchers involved in ToW gravy train

        Yip that non existant Maori Elite doing very nicely thank you….

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  January 7, 2019

          Plenty in academia and the bureaucracy too. And on govt appointed boards and committees.

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  January 7, 2019

            @Alan – “Plenty in academia and the bureaucracy too. And on govt appointed boards and committees” … where, like Pakeha in similar positions, they WORK!

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              Possibly, or just entertained each other pontifcating and deciding what is good for other people.

  3. Gezza

     /  January 7, 2019

    Wikipedia summarises it thus:

    Decolonization (American English) or decolonisation (British English) is the undoing of colonialism, the latter being the process whereby a nation establishes and maintains its domination over one or more other territories. The concept particularly applies to the dismantlement, during the second half of the 20th century, of the colonial empires established prior to World War I throughout the world.

    However, decolonization not only includes the complete “removal of the domination of non-indigenous forces” within the geographical space and different institutions of the colonized, but it also includes the intellectual decolonization from the colonizers’ ideas that made the colonized feel inferior.

    The United Nations Special Committee on Decolonization has stated that in the process of decolonization there is no alternative to the colonizer but to allow a process of self-determination, but in practice decolonization may involve either nonviolent revolution or national liberation wars by pro-independence groups. It may be intramural or involve the intervention of foreign powers acting individually or through international bodies such as the United Nations.

    Although examples of decolonization can be found as early as the writings of Thucydides, there have been several particularly active periods of decolonization in modern times. These include the breakup of the Spanish Empire in the 19th century; of the German, Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman, and Russian Empires following World War I; of the British, French, Dutch, Japanese, Portuguese, Belgian and Italian colonial empires following World War II; and of the Soviet Union (successor to the Russian Empire) in 1991.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decolonization

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  January 7, 2019

    but it also includes the intellectual decolonization from the colonizers’ ideas that made the colonized feel inferior

    Fatuous. It wasn’t the colonisers’ ideas that made the colonised feel inferior, it was their technology, knowledge, accumulated written world wisdom and philosophy.

    The only escape from that is to incorporate the new knowledge, skills and wisdom into your own culture.

    Why do people write and believe such utter, obvious drivel?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  January 7, 2019

      No it’s not fatuous. It was a common feature of imperialism that those ruled over by Europeans needed to be ruled over by Europeans simply because they were inferior races.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  January 7, 2019

        Rubbish. NZ elected Maori MPs back in 1867. There was a concern by colonists that they might be outvoted, that’s all. The rules for voting eligibility were the same irrespective of race.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  January 7, 2019

          Actually fatuous X 2.

          Firstly, you made a specific statement rejecting a Wikipedia definition or explanation that applies to colonisation generally, when in fact you only wanted to talk about the New Zealand experience. So, total fail there. Embarrassingly so for you.

          Secondly, in the New Zealand context The Treaty of Waitangi was quickly abrogated because the settler governments overwhelmed Maori with numbers and it then it became all about protecting & promoting the interests of the foreign settlers and ignoring the alternative system of local governance that Maori lived by – because they were inferior at protecting the interests of the foreign settlers.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  January 7, 2019

            More drivel. The NZ experience was driven by humanitarian beliefs in the coloniser – from London. It wasn’t local at all.

            Your second paragraph is so utterly fatuous it doesn’t deserve comment.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              It’s not clear to me how your adding this kind of drivel to your previous fatuous remarks improves things.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              It saves me the tedium of having to step through the facts and logic your utterly fatuous paragraph ignores.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Piffle.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              You may call it that if you wish. I called it “utterly fatuous”.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Twaddle.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              Your brevity is an improvement.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Yes. I realised no further explanation was needed in reply to your poppycock, Sir Alan, and any further time spent would be wasted effort.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              Sadly that’s a regression.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Tosh.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  January 7, 2019

              Better.

  5. sorethumb

     /  January 7, 2019

    “I don’t think they were prepared for us in practice. We were intent on drawing attention to the museum as an imperial structure that is intimately tied to systemic whiteness. We also strove to highlight how individuals reproduced institutions. In meetings, we threw out phrases like ‘white fragility’ and ‘systemic racism’ to staff who had, perhaps, never been confronted in this way. Although we were allowed creative freedom within the exhibition and were encouraged to be candid, it often felt like the price of our honesty was any future chance to work with the museum or, worse, that it might jeopardise further decolonial projects. Though we were encouraged to be upfront, we were never sure where we stood.”

    They are now talking about Maorification. Christchurch’s $92m library “Turanga” is an example of that
    https://www.aam-us.org/2018/12/17/decolonisation-we-arent-going-to-save-you/?fbclid=IwAR3W7OXCdAmvJx-Gic_RThBWrmsnpiHGNy_din_La-l28Iv6cZSeqCi4hyQ

    Reply
  6. sorethumb

     /  January 7, 2019

    Good on you bring this up Pete George.

    Reply
  7. PartisanZ

     /  January 7, 2019

    I don’t think of decolonisation in Aotearoa NZ as going backwards. I think it’s just a rather indistinct term for a somewhat indistinct and very broad ‘activity’ …

    Decolonisation might equally be described as ‘Cultural Awareness & Sensitivity Development’? It can happen and is happening at every level from the individual to the nation as a whole … the collective psyche …

    I picture it more like a fledgling bird shedding its downy-feathers in preparation for taking flight.

    Having coined the word Optimocracy – “Rule of the Best” – I am investigating its implications, including whether in their own ‘fledgling’ or perhaps more full-fledged and advanced sort of way, Maori weren’t already operating their own ‘South Seas’ form of Optimocracy?

    As pointed out in a book I’m reading, Canadian Aboriginals were labelled ‘uncivilized’ because they hadn’t invented the wheel. But the wheel was no use for travelling in Canada – until roads were built. The Aboriginals (like Maori here) certainly were expert at travelling by canoe on the rivers though … This might be called ‘Place Appropriate Intelligence’ or PAI! So who are the uncivilized ones?

    Westminster might also be a flawed attempt at Optimocracy?

    There’s plenty of oral history evidence and modern-day assertion that pre-European Maori rangatira required some form of ‘mandate’ from their people … that it wasn’t only ‘might equals right’ … Leaders were identified young, trained and allowed to flourish, compete and cooperate … and could be changed …

    Likewise there’s plenty of evidence that ‘might equals right’ played and still plays a significant role in European government …

    I’m greatly heartened by the idea of Optimocracy. Having read in Matike Mai about the extraordinary goodwill that still exists among Maori towards Pakeha/Tauiwi, despite everything, I can see the offspring of these two fledgling birds – a Legislative Assembly/Marae Ture – soaring like te Kahu does above the river-hills at our place …

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 7, 2019

      Westminster – or variegated Westminster like we have – might also be a flawed attempt at Optimocracy?

      After all, that’s what today’s politicians try to do: They attempt to convince us they and above all THEIR PARTY are the ‘best’ party-person for the job … The best money managers, the best tax-savers, the best profiteers, the best inciters of race fear-and-hatred … or whatever … The best social reformers … the best national-debt reducers …

      So, while I favour MMP over FPP, electoral reform will definitely be necessary to reduce the power of Political Parties … which are relative anathema to the ideal of ‘best’ … and which are given far too much importance under either system …

      Genuine decolonisation and bicultural multiculturalism will go hand-in-hand with electoral reform … as part of our new Constitution …

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  January 7, 2019

        As I’ve said to you elsewhere, the World has had millenia of Optimocracies, PZ. They eventually become hereditary kings, emperors, and royal families, born and specially trained to rule. Or theocracies. Or plutocracies. Or Corporatocracies.

        Governance by Optimocracies is a feature of many sci-fi novels and movies too.

        Changing the rulers evenutally becomes difficult when what they think is best for the people is not best for the people, but they have control of the gold and the forces of law and order because they pay their wages.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          And I should believe you because you’ve said it?

          I’m talking about a new thing which combines ‘democracy’ – the popular vote – with oli-pluto-theocracy-style governance …

          About creating the conditions for the ‘best’ to be recognized, selected as candidates and elected and perhaps some chosen or appointed as well … as they are in a sense via MMP … as I understand currently are the House of Lords …

          “Blind trust in catchwords has induced people to believe again and again that a particular system was the only right one … but one single principle of selection will not cover the manifold and varied character of humanity …” (Warner)

          Ethical Optimocracy will probably have to be founded on ‘Civics Education’ and various means and even encouragements toward participating proactively in ‘governance’ and may take a generation or more to introduce … after which, like our Constitution, it will always remain ‘amendable’ and amenable to improvement … evolving …

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  January 7, 2019

            And I should believe you because you’ve said it?
            No I think you read some world history and think about it.

            I’m talking about a new thing which combines ‘democracy’ – the popular vote – with oli-pluto-theocracy-style governance … About creating the conditions for the ‘best’ to be recognized, selected as candidates and elected and perhaps some chosen or appointed as well … as they are in a sense via MMP … as I understand currently are the House of Lords …

            I think that’s a real mish mash of a concept but good luck with selling it. That’s what feudalism & then the Magna Carta led to in the UK. It didn’t work out well enuf for the commoners.Retrograde imo.

            “Blind trust in catchwords has induced people to believe again and again that a particular system was the only right one … but one single principle of selection will not cover the manifold and varied character of humanity …” (Warner)

            So what? I should think that’s in any way useful because Warner said it?

            Ethical Optimocracy will probably have to be founded on ‘Civics Education’ and various means and even encouragements toward participating proactively in ‘governance’ and may take a generation or more to introduce … after which, like our Constitution, it will always remain ‘amendable’ and amenable to improvement … evolving …

            Yeah, righto. And I should believe you because you said it?

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Interested though in hearing what you think Civics Education should cover.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Nope … I have zero expectation of you believing me just because I say it …

              That’s why I don’t say things to you like “As I’ve said to you elsewhere …” and “I think you should read some world history and think about it” …

              Your condescension knows no bounds at times Gezza … I think you suffer from runaway Blego* … Blog-Ego … new word # 193 …

              Westminster IS a form of feudalism derived from the Magna Carta …

              There’s probably a well developed ‘Civics’ cirricullum in countries that teach it … Mr Google will help you … but I’d also include children in the governance of their classroom and their school … and indeed, the governance of their educational options, one of which might be ‘not school’ …

              An example was given by Alan a while ago of Mrs Al’s class who ‘elected’ to cover the cirricullum in half the year and do what they ‘elected’ to do for the remainder …

              There’s much more likelihood of kids given those sorts of opportunities growing up to be citizens capable of electing-selecting or even standing as ‘the best’ …

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Don’t be a prat. Disagreeing with you and explaining why is not condescension. You are probably one of the least qualified to lecture anyone for condescension and probably nobody here should. We could all be accused of it.

              I am giving you my opinion like everybody else here does and explaining why history shows there have been numerous examples of systems of governance that evolved from simple tribal forms such as those you posit.

              We even have a new system of government being trialled in the US. Government by Twitter.

              No form of government is ever likely to satisfy everybody. Human nature being what it is.

              Compare the policies and politics of colonial New Zealand, then early settler governments, then our most recent governments. There is a clear evolution happening already with our existing form of democracy. That’s one of the beauties of the current system.

              Kids doing what they like isn’t a system of governance for a country or even a community. It’s a class. Young people can already choose to engage or not engage in politics. We did. We hit the streets. We protested, We voted for parties who had policies that best represented our views. And some joined parties in sufficient numbers and with sufficient force of personality and argument to generate those policies.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              While I think about it, why not have a read up on Ancient Greece and Rome and China. They had systems of governance similar to what you are talking about. See how they worked out in the end? Then see how you think things would be different with what you are proposing. Just a suggestion.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              I’m not positing “governance that evolved from simple tribal forms” …

              I’m positing taking the best of each and all and creating a new ‘best’ … never seen or experienced before …

              The glacial evolution of our current system is one of its drawbacks not one of its beauties! Cannabis Law Reform is the perfect example …

              However, I don’t advocate radical thoughtless change. I advocate radically improving deliberative democracy …

              Oh yes, the failure of Chinese governance is remarkable … They are about to rule the world financially because of it …

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Young people can’t choose to engage or not engage in class though, can they … other than ‘failing’ …

              I never said “kids doing what they like” …

              Your powers of misrepresenting what I say rival your powers of condescension IMHO …

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Farkinell. You beggar bloody belief sometimes PZ.

              Misrepresenting what someone else is say could be your BLOODY TRADEMARK, mate.

              Along with SHOUTING at EVERYONE, like this, on A REGULAR BASIS. Nobody does it like YOU.

              AND HYPOCRISY – like whining when somebody reflects back what you just did.

              IMH bloody O.

              How much more character assassination do you want to have a go at mate, just because I disagree with some of your comments?

              Because if you want to carry on with this line, I’m up for it until such time as PG steps in and has a word.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Oh yes, the failure of Chinese governance is remarkable … They are about to rule the world financially because of it …

              Another one with problems in reading for comprehension. I suggested you read up on their history. Read back on the system of governance they evolved with their professional class. Not colonised, nationalist and then communist and communo-capitalist systems. At least have the decency to ask what I mean instead of misrepresenting what I’m saying, as usual.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Ancient Greece and Rome and China DIDN’T have systems of government like I’m talking about Gezza, because I’m talking about something entirely new that evolves out of Aotearoa New Zealand’s peculiar bicultural foundations and experience …

              So I won’t be reading back on those systems for the purpose of comparing Lychees with Oranges … especially not when we’re having a discussion about ‘decolonisation’ here in Aotearoa NZ …

              I originally simply suggested that Optimocracy was a useful term in analyzing democracy’s record past and present, forms of government and possible future developments in ‘governance’ … a possible successor to ‘democracy’?

              It might even be a useful and positive way to look at Maori governance models like rangatiratanga? These are still generally viewed as “primitive”, uncivilized and therefore negative …

              You don’t agree, that’s fine.

              An example of governance by the best IMHO would be Geoffrey Palmer, a thoroughly decent and rational if dispassionate man … but not ‘popular’ like John Key [though I can’t think of one example of him being ‘passionate’ either] … who IMHO was not a representative of “the best” at all, and certainly not just because he was popular … Do you see?

              In order to have the best governance, something about the popularity contest of (so-called) democracy will need to change … I reckon … which might make it better than democracy … or Optimocracy …?

              Anyhow, this is going nowhere now so I will bow out and cook dinner.

          • Griff.

             /  January 7, 2019

            What he is really saying is an unelected maori upper house should have veto power over the rest of ours democratically elected government
            AKA race based goverment for the benefit of a minority … Apartheid.

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Is that you Muriel?

              CHARGE!!!!!

              I wish I harboured such an abiding belief in [so-called] democracy …

              “It turns out that no form of government, once in power, can be trusted to limit its own ambition, to extend freedom and to wither away. This means that it is up to the citizenry, those outside of power, to engage in permanent combat with the state, short of violent, escalatory revolution, but beyond the gentility of the ballot-box, to ensure justice, freedom and well-being, all those values which virtually the entire world has come to believe in.” – Howard Zinn

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Yep. Even he sees that an Optimocracy could never be trusted either.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              An Optimocracy would make provision for its own removal and replacement or “improvement” … because while it too couldn’t be trusted it could at least be trusted MORE than our current sham ‘Democracy’ …

              Despite the provisions in their Constitution the Americans will never do it, no matter how bad things get … You’d need to have an army prepared to act on behalf of the people rather than the President … and in reality the American military would only act on behalf of military-industrial, corporate-political elites anyhow …

              So what do you want me to do Gezza? Do you want me to say, “I give up. This democracy we have now is the best we’ll ever come up with”?

              Just be satisfied Parti. You’re in a plane … the jump-door is open … the green light is ‘ON’ … and you’re wearing a fishnet parachute.

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              So what do you want me to do Gezza? Do you want me to say, “I give up. This democracy we have now is the best we’ll ever come up with”?

              Nope. I’d be pissing in the wind there, wouldn’t I?

              I think our democracy could be improved and in all likelihood will be. But probably incrementally, over time. There’ll always be the problem that most people go looking for someone to lead them and make the decisions when it comes to governance. And while they then like to moan about the government not doing what they think it should or promised it would, they don’t actually want to get into government themselves because it involves a lot of effort and making compromises they don’t have to make if they just criticise from the sidelines.

              I do like what (admittedly little) I know of the Swiss model where most of what the national income tax gets spent on is decided on at the local level. Change will happen over time because our current system of government allows it to happen. As it already has. It happens when one or more issues get big enuf, or the politicians get remote enuf, that there’s mass civil unrest or push for change and some party hears it and delivers it up as policy, and sticks with it.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              You’d be pissing in the wind alright!

              I’m not advocating sudden change, although the idea of a yet unknown form of Optimocracy is no doubt threatening to some …

              I suggest the process of Constitution building will take 20-odd years and will involve incremental legislative change although by 2040 there might be a relatively sudden transition to a somewhat transformed type of government … Legislative Assembly/Marae Ture … along with Republican status, a new flag, a new Coat-of-Arms and/or Carved Pou … or something … whatever we decide between now and then …

              Many people in the population were all in favour of one of those sudden transitions – a new flag – just a couple of years ago …

              I feel like you’re alluding to me “just criticizing from the sidelines”. Are you? I’m a paid-up member of a political party … active in local ‘community’ politics …

            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              I feel like you’re alluding to me “just criticizing from the sidelines”. Are you? I’m a paid-up member of a political party … active in local ‘community’ politics

              No I’m talking about all of us.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Glad I asked in that case …

    • Pink David

       /  January 7, 2019

      “But the wheel was no use for travelling in Canada – until roads were built. ”

      Funny. It may surprise you to know, but roads appear everywhere people have developed the wheel.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  January 7, 2019

        Not the point PD … The wheel being unnecessary in their civilization didn’t make it any less civilized … The wheel is effectively an irrelevant measure of ‘progress’ in this situation …

        Reply
  8. acrossthespectrum

     /  January 7, 2019

    Maori Decol is a chic circa 2000 term used by young Maori academics.
    But in truth All NZ has been undergoing Decolonizing since 1790..
    The first Brit immigrants wanted to Decol themselves from their former masters in the class system of Britain that’s why they came here to build a less classless society.
    Having freed themselves from the yoke of their feudal masters it is ironic
    that they then became overlords here.
    Decol was prevalent in the Waikato and Taranaki through to the 1870’s in the form of outright opposition which was ruthlessly suppressed and along with the effect of introduced diseases Maori were down to 10% of the 1840 population and were fully expected to become extinct. By 1880 despite immigrants original goals NZ had indeed become
    a Pacific Britain in thought word and deed.
    Wars and depression held back change for the first half of the 20 century.
    But by the 1960’s the climate was right for reform.
    It came as a shock when in the early 1970’s NZ began experiencing
    a civil rights era driven not by Maori but by white people wanting to decolonize
    themselves from the white male military style country NZ had become.
    The anti Vietnam marches were led by white students.
    The rise of the feminist movement was led by white academics women.
    The emergence of NZ writers artists film makers NZ content on TV all led by white people. Environmental awareness also began in the early 70’s was led by white people.
    Reform and updating of many issues like education, health. H&S employment,
    housing, elder car were almost all driven by white people.
    Maori renaissance was one of the last issues to be addressed and was a tiny part
    of the changes taking place in the ’70s decade of social change.
    The Spring Bok tour of 1981 crystalized the tensions in NZ.
    The Homosexual law reform bill was another extremely painfully
    fought issue polarising the country in 1985.
    The level of hate expressed during these two issues was on the
    same level as the 1951 waterfront strike..
    The reforming Labour Gov’t 1984-1987 is pivotal in these changes.
    Politics in NZ reached its Nadir during this era.
    Pitched battles were fought in NZ politics the like we have never seen again.
    Since 1990 the Decol process of reform has continued apace
    processed by all parties with MMP playing a significant role.
    Now days it is more about detail rather than substance as
    the major battles were fought and won by 1990.
    Politics today is almost genteel compared to the mid 1980’s.
    NZ has become so gentrified that politics is more coffee table
    evening television than public husting.
    “Decolonization”
    Meaning.
    From “acrossthespectrum” dictionary.
    Maori Decol is a chic circa 2000 term used by young Maori academics.
    Not to be confused with “Decolonization” of New Zealand 1790 -1990.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 7, 2019

      @acrossthespectrum (of what?) – “The first Brit immigrants wanted to Decol themselves from their former masters in the class system of Britain that’s why they came here to build a more [correction] classless society. Having freed themselves from the yoke of their feudal masters it is ironic that they then became overlords here.”

      Garbage IMHO. Some of the first immigrants wanted to create a more classless society and some wanted to recreate the class-stratified society of Britain … Much of the tension of NZ politics since has been across this [essentially] class divide …

      They were all colonizers …

      “Politics today is almost genteel compared to the mid 1980’s.”

      Politics today is subdued like the mind of a person suffering from and medicated for depression and hopelessness … Douglas won … We got Rogered …

      Reply
  9. acrossthespectrum

     /  January 7, 2019

    @PartisanZ
    acrossthespectrum (of what?) –
    I may well ask PartisanZ (of what?)

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 7, 2019

      Partisan – synonyms: supporter, follower, adherent, devotee, champion, backer, upholder, promoter, fanatic, fan, enthusiast, stalwart, zealot, disciple, votary; booster, cohort …

      P = People, Play, Politics, Psychology …

      anZ = Aotearoa New Zealand – and a bit of a dig at Kiwi ‘branding’ …

      The cause is Frank E Warner’s [Ernst Frankenstein’s] Natural Ethics … as expounded in his 1944 book ‘Future of Man’ …

      “In the political organisation the best men [and women] should act for the benefit of all. This entails certain preliminary conditions, the most important being the elimination of the party spirit. Party spirit is one of the phenomena of the herd instinct, which it is the task of Natural Ethics to combat.” pg 138

      Sadly I may have the only extant copy of the book in my possession … It is exceedingly subversive by ‘orthodox’ standards …

      So what’s your ‘what’?

      Reply
      • acrossthespectrum

         /  January 7, 2019

        “acrossthespectrum” means
        I can see far too the left and far to the right along the political spectrum and everything in between..well that’s what I believe I can and should do…

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          Beats ‘Kluelis’ I guess … 🤣😊✌😁😎

          ‘Broadspectrum’ too for that matter!!! 😂😎

          Reply
          • acrossthespectrum

             /  January 7, 2019

            yeah there used to be a tv programme called spectrum too remember?

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  January 7, 2019

              Are you referring to Captain Scarlet & The Mysterons, trum?

              Set in 2068, Captain Scarlet presents the hostilities between Earth and a race of Martians known as the Mysterons. After human astronauts attack their city on Mars due to a misunderstanding [Figures – if it was American humans it would have to be a “misunderstanding”], the vengeful Mysterons declare war on Earth, initiating a series of reprisals that are countered by Spectrum, a worldwide security organisation.

              Spectrum boasts the extraordinary abilities of its primary agent, Captain Scarlet. In the first episode, Scarlet acquires the Mysteron healing factor of “retro-metabolism” and is thereafter considered to be virtually “indestructible”, being able to recover fully from injuries that would normally be fatal.
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Scarlet_and_the_Mysterons

      • acrossthespectrum

         /  January 7, 2019

        Some other synonyms of partisan are ” biased, prejudiced, one-sided, coloured, discriminatory, preferential, partial, interested, parti pris, bigoted, sectarian, factional, unjust, unfair, inequitable, unbalanced”

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          I ‘IDENTIFY’ with the first set of synonyms … that’s my CHOSEN culture … You see?

          Reply
          • acrossthespectrum

             /  January 7, 2019

            I like the passion of Partisan but not the bias unwavering belief.
            Sometimes we have to evolve.

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              By their very nature PartisanZ are constantly adapting and evolving …

              Sorry, no point for that one! 😊☮🤔

        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          You’re describing ‘partisan politics’ … which I am resisting …

          Reply
          • acrossthespectrum

             /  January 7, 2019

            @PartisanZ “You’re describing ‘partisan politics’ … which I am resisting” …
            I think I am not the only one on this site ROTFLMFAO
            You have put a huge smile on my face you have made my day 🙂

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              You think an open-minded, adaptive, evolving PartisanZ is not resisting ‘partisan politics’ but rather engaged in it? Okay … whatever …

              Do you think that maintaining the ‘Party Line’ at National, Labour, NZFirst, Greens, ACT or any other Political Party ISN’T partisan?

              Come now … Really!?

              Sorry to hear your day can be “made” by such cheap attempts at points-scoring …

              Which blog did you get banned from?

        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          A “partisan” is also a three-pointed spear or pike …

          Ψ

          Also the Greek symbol for ‘Psyche’ I believe …

          Reply
          • acrossthespectrum

             /  January 7, 2019

            @Geza. “Are you referring to Captain Scarlet & The Mysterons, trum?”
            Why not Gez? The Dr beat up on the Dalek in the DR Who New Years day special so why not take on Captain Scarlet the Mysterons and Partisan all at once 🙂 Make a day of it take a picnic basket 🙂 🙂 🙂
            To be fair I would just call for Thunder Bird 2 with Virgil and Brains would orgainise a rescue as per usual. Remember “Anything could happen in the next half hour”. 5=4=3=2=1= Thunderbirds are goooooo

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              New tactic … Reduce the topic to an object of ridicule … Ho hum!

              A bit like poking holes in your own parachute … 😒

  10. acrossthespectrum

     /  January 7, 2019

    @PartisanZ. I wonder if you know my ex Michelle Dubois of Allo Allo 🙂
    or maybe you know my ex flying buddy Colonel Hogan at Stalag 13 🙂

    Reply
  11. PartisanZ

     /  January 7, 2019

    Despite the popularity of America and hence the American Constitution … which allows for the abolition and re-establishment of governments … a written Constitution for Aotearoa New Zealand is not a popular idea is it?

    Could this be because the American’s have successfully written-off and written their Aboriginals out of their Constitution?

    Could it be that many ‘Kiwis’ want to wait until they feel they can do the same here?

    Reply
  12. acrossthespectrum

     /  January 7, 2019

    No. But one for the conspiracy pages I guess.
    I think you might get more traction with that one with Uncle Dun Mihaha 🙂

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 7, 2019

      😁 Why? I got traction with it here … from you! 😉

      Reply
      • acrossthespectrum

         /  January 7, 2019

        @PartisanZ. “Reduce the topic to an object of ridicule … Ho hum!” Not at all PZ. I like your individual personality. You are a refreshingly original poster. Like every one on here I sense your passion. Bravo Brah. Most of us myself included sometimes take our selves far too seriously. Its good to be able to inject some comic relief into the other wise relentless grind of political debate. I always read your posts Parti. keep em coming.

        Reply
      • acrossthespectrum

         /  January 7, 2019

        @Parti Why? I got traction with it here … from you! 😉
        Lol. Yes well I suggested to you I don’t think your concept will fly.
        But if you call that traction well that’s ok.
        Watch out for low flying forests and buildings 🙂

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  January 7, 2019

          Certainly the progression of resolving Treaty issues and Te Tiriti o Waitangi’s constitutional place will be an interesting process over the next 22 years …

          IMHO “clarity and certainty” for Te Tiriti in a new Constitution will definitely result in improvements to ‘democracy’ which must surely tend in the direction of optimocracy …

          Rule by the elected and appointed and rotated and ‘whatever we decide’ “best” …

          God, it can’t be any worse than the corporate-political, pluto-oligarchic consultant-charitocracy we’ve got now …

          Wanna buy a bridge? 😁

          Reply
          • acrossthespectrum

             /  January 7, 2019

            A bridge?

            Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  January 7, 2019

            Nah … She’s right … I shouldn’t have undercut my own ‘serious’ comment …

            I have a habit of adding something that gives people an ‘out’ of the real content … easy diversion …

            So, back to the question: Some kind of Optimocracy can’t be any worse than the corporate-political, pluto-oligarchic consultant-charitocracy we’ve got now … can it?

            Reply
            • Gerrit

               /  January 7, 2019

              “ome kind of Optimocracy can’t be any worse than the corporate-political, pluto-oligarchic consultant-charitocracy we’ve got now … can it?”

              Only if you can restrict the length of term they can be employed as the peoples servant.

              No job for life.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 7, 2019

              Yes … and if the people of Aotearoa New Zealand meet at Town Halls, on marae, online, in newspapers, at seminars and workshops over a period of years such entirely sensible and necessary limitations and restrictions will undoubtedly be suggested – based on the obvious flaws of present-day ‘democracy’ – and be debated, deliberated and [whatever decision] will be agreed …

              Or perhaps restrict the length of term they can be employed as the peoples servant in any single capacity? This way institutional memory might not be jeopardized?

              This sort of ‘process’ you and I are engaged in right now is exactly what Palmer & Butler are proposing in ‘Towards Democratic Renewal’ … (and I happen to reckon if we’re going to ‘renew’ it let’s call it something different) …

              How scary is that? I’m not scared. Are you Gerrit? Yet it appears to abjectly terrify an entire, extremely vocal (and in some cases just extreme) minority of the population …

              I wonder why?

  13. PartisanZ

     /  January 7, 2019

    So … It might be possible, given great effort and goodwill, to re-frame the generally perceived as negative process of ‘decolonization’ into a generally perceived as positive process of co-creating Optimocracy?

    Reply

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