Peters at Ratana: “People may doubt what you say, but they will believe what you do.”

In Jacinda Ardern’s absence (she is in Europe at Davos) Winston Peters deputised for her at Ratana this year. It waas a lot more low key than last year, Ardern’s first time there as Prime Minister and a 100 year anniversary of the Ratana moovement.

Peters’  Ratana Speech 2019


Kia ora tatou.

Thank you for the invitation to be here. It is a great privilege to be welcomed to Ratana again.

Let me acknowledge the leadership of Tumuaki Harerangi Meihana, those of you who have already addressed the Government from the Taumata, and the presence of all of the members of the Ratana Church.

Also let us acknowledge the attendance of Government parties, the Green Party, Labour, and New Zealand First all here today on a united front.

On behalf of the Government, let me extend the apologies of the Prime Minister who could not attend today because of her work commitments which means she is currently travelling overseas.

This year we mark one hundred and one years since Wiremu Ratana started his spiritual journey which has become the Ratana movement as we know it today.

This time last year was Ratana’s centenary. Your church was 100 years old and the new Labour-New Zealand First coalition government, supported by the Green Party, was less than 100 days old.

When the government stood before you all last year we promised a Government with a difference.

A government which looked after people.  A government which addressed neglect and social inequality. A government which grows the economy and is getting people back into work.

But as the old saying goes – words are not deeds. One year on, this government has put deeds to its words.

The Families package that we brought in last year is lifting the income of 384,000 families by $75 a week when fully rolled out.  Doctors’ visits are now free for all children under 14. Doctors’ visits also became cheaper for those with Community Services Cards, and more money has been invested into hospitals. We are opening more housing opportunities through Kiwibuild homes.  And we are heavily investing in the economic development of our regions through the provincial growth fund and the billion dollar tree plantings programme. Unemployment is at 3.9 per cent – the lowest it’s been in decades. And the number of jobs available is increasing.

In December the Child Poverty Reduction Law was passed to dramatically change the circumstances experienced in this country. The government has spent its first year in office setting directions and laying foundations for long term solutions to problems this country should never have tolerated.

The Budget that is coming is focused on “wellbeing”. The Labour-New Zealand First coalition government does not seek to overpromise and under deliver for short term venal self-interest. We have a purpose in this government which unites three different parties.

We are a government which seeks to correct the fundamental infrastructure and social deficits we have ignored for far too long.

As we consistently said there are no overnight solutions, but there is progress to be made from long term investments.

We are setting out to create jobs in the regions and provinces to ensure that no part of the country is forgotten. To create opportunities for productive businesses, regions, iwi and others to transition to a sustainable and low-emissions economy.

In many respects there is no real separation between what this Government wants to achieve for its people, and the work that T W Ratana committed his life to achieving.  He housed the people – here on his own land. He gave people jobs inside the Ratana community.  He looked after families – gave them a place to live and put food on their table.  He gave people hope for a better future.

As a government, we put actions to our promises, as we continue to deliver for New Zealand with many of the same objectives.   And in another 12 months when we return to your marae you will see more progress.

For there is an old saying: “People may doubt what you say, but they will believe what you do.”


That saying is apt for Peters, but he may not be saying it to highlight his own walk versus talk.

It is also something that Ardern should be aware of: “People may doubt what you say, but they will believe what you do.”

She (and her Government) has a lot of doing to do, to deliver on all the saying.

35 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  January 25, 2019

    Simon cracks a reasonable sort of joke in this tvnz report from 1ewes at 6 last nite on the pollies turning up at Ratana. 😮

    Could be learning to lighten up? :/

    Hope I haven’t thrown away a $2 bag of jet planes on my dairy owner betting he’ll be out of the leader job by 30 June 😕

  2. sorethumb

     /  January 25, 2019

    Also let us acknowledge the attendance of Government parties, the Green Party, Labour, and New Zealand First all here today on a united front.
    …….
    As in what’s the difference between say Peter(s) Poodle and Golly G – if there is something I must be missing it?

    “Doctors’ visits are now free for all children under 14. Doctors’ visits also became cheaper for those with Community Services Cards,” Up for some down for others. I don’t mind that in a way but there is also working for families?

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  January 25, 2019

    Doctor visits cheaper? Has anyone noticed? Mine have gone up slightly not down.

    • Blazer

       /  January 25, 2019

      flash your gold card.

      • Corky

         /  January 25, 2019

        Righties don’t flash Goldcards.. it’s too down market, Blazer. My visits have also increased slightly. Maybe doctors are clawing back extra revenue under the guise of ‘increased administration costs?’

        • Gezza

           /  January 25, 2019

          That’s odd. Are your docs not PHOs?

          • Corky

             /  January 25, 2019

            Yes, I think they are. I’m not signed up though. The personal information they required was too intrusive. The security of information too lax..and an administration person who couldn’t explain what she was trying to get me to sign, meant I wasn’t interested.

            • Gezza

               /  January 25, 2019

              Righto. Fair enuf. Can’t be too careful these days I suppose.

              I’d try and avoid getting caught on CCTV cams at supermarkets and suchlike too. Wear a disguise maybe?

            • Corky

               /  January 25, 2019

              Taking it a little far, aren’t you? Why not look at people wearing shorts. Varicose veins, or lack thereof, give a general indication of a the persons
              cardiovascular health.

              That way if someone tries to steal your mobility scooter you can shout:

              ”My good man..you may have a defective cardiovascular system. Don’t risk it !!”

            • Gezza

               /  January 25, 2019

              😀

        • Blazer

           /  January 25, 2019

          so righties are not interested in the Gold Card…pull the other one it plays …’O’Fortuna’!

    • Gezza

       /  January 25, 2019

      Yup – down from $55 to $18.50 for me down here, reading the Med Centre fees schedule when I took ma down there last week for a checkup.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  January 25, 2019

        Must be your penalty for living in a posh neighbourhood, Sir Gerald.

        • Gezza

           /  January 25, 2019

          More like yours. You just about have to take out a mortgage to buy fish and chips up there.

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  January 25, 2019

            Actually no, median wage is low here.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  January 25, 2019

              Enrolling in a PHO only needs details that any practice would have; name, age, date of birth, ethnicity. Nothing excessively personal, all protected by the Privacy Act. It costs me $18.

            • Corky

               /  January 25, 2019

              Alan’s has no interest in enrolment forms. I was talking about them. What would you know about the form I was offered? If yours had small print..that would generally be under ”name, age, date of birth, etc, it might pay to read it and see who can access your information. Of course they say it’s only for stat purposes and your information won’t be tied to your name? Yeah, right.

              You did read the fine print? Of course you did.

  4. artcroft

     /  January 25, 2019

    So Peters is declaring that despite the rhetoric he’s a convinced open borders globalist. Caught in a moment of honesty I guess.

    • Gezza

       /  January 25, 2019

      What makes you think that? May have a completely different policy near the next election.

      • artcroft

         /  January 25, 2019

        Very true.

        • Blazer

           /  January 25, 2019

          two great ,profound minds…creative,original and …just…

          ‘adamsmith1922 / January 25, 2019
          Very true

  5. David

     /  January 25, 2019

    Quite funny Peters getting all bent out of shape with the media when he was reminded about giving Key a slap for going to Davos instead or Ratana.

    • Duker

       /  January 25, 2019

      “Then-Labour leader Andrew Little declined to use it[Key at Davos in 2015] for political gain, saying it was important for New Zealand to have a presence on the world stage.”

      • Trevors_Elbow

         /  January 25, 2019

        Duker… what has Little got to do with a comment Peters? Comprehension not high at the troll farm???

  1. Peters at Ratana: “People may doubt what you say, but they will believe what you do.” — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition