Major challenges for ‘exasperated’ Ardern

All governments have challenges. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and her current government have quite a few major challenges stacking up. Ardern seems to rise to international occasions – where all she has done is make grand but very general proclamations – she is not so happy when confronted with real problems dogging her back in New Zealand.

Whether it was this reluctance to front up over domestic difficulties, or jet lag, (and being away from her baby for a week for the first time would likely have been difficult for her), Ardern was reported to be ‘exasperated’ at questions about real issues that need to be dealt with and should be explained.

Audrey Young: Eight big problems for Jacinda Ardern

Jacinda Ardern has made a less-than-grand entrance back to mundane domestic politics after her whirlwind visit to Europe last week reinforced her status as a rising star on the international stage.

The Prime Minister delegated her regular Tuesday morning media appearances to Finance Minister Grant Robertson and who could blame her? He was forced to spend most of his time defending the failure of KiwiBuild targets and preparing the groundwork for the delivery of the capital gains tax report.

These are things that the Government cannot hide from, and Ardern should be showing some leadership on.

At her first post-Cabinet press conference she announced she would be delaying any Cabinet reshuffle until after the May Budget.

Perhaps this makes some sense in leaving current ministers to work out how they are going to frame their budge requests as fitting with Arderrn’;s ‘wellbeing’ agenda, and maybe there aren’t a lot of options for replacing poorly performing ministers. There are quite a few who have been disappointing, but there is  even less experience amongst those waiting for promotion.

In the substance of the press conference, Ardern sounded exasperated at questions about the failure of KiwiBuild to meet its first milestone of 1000 houses by July, and by questions about the capital gains tax report.

Ardern’s tetchiness perhaps reflects a raft of challenging issues facing the Government. After a year of settling in, reviewing the past and setting priorities, 2019 will have to be a year of delivery.

It should be a year of delivery, but yesterday Grant Robertson indicated that it may take some time for them to make up their minds about the Tax Working Group recommendations, especially the controversial hobbled CGT.

Robertson patiently continued his mission to change the language over the tax by calling it a “capital income tax” rather than a “capital gains tax” — an attempt to equate it to all other income.

Ardern became impatient when questions turned to the undisputed veto that NZ First will have on any capital gains tax — the Greens have been unequivocal supporters and NZ First longstanding opponents.

Apparently a capital gains tax is just like every other issue the Government debates, and requires the agreement of all three parties.

That is probably correct. See next post.

She also became exasperated when questioned about the failure of KiwiBuild targets — so much so that she could not bring herself to actually say “No” when repeatedly asked if the July target would be met.

A tough day at the media conference, unlike her wowing of international media on her trip to the UK and Europe.

Young details the major issues that Ardern should be dealing with (and fronting up on):

Capital gains tax:

Michael Cullen’s final report is due to be delivered to the Government this week and promises to be the best weapon National will have at next year’s election.

Kiwibuild: The flagship housing policy of 100,000 houses in 10 years is heading for the rocks. A perfect lesson in why political parties should resist over-promising.

Fair Pay Agreements: The Bolger report revisiting national awards has not yet been published but the campaign against it by employers has already begun.

Mental health report: Done and delivered to the Government but the next Budget in May seems a long time to have to wait until this area is properly addressed, having had years of delay under National as well.

Tomorrow’s Schools: The Government has yet to respond to the Bali Haque report restructuring school administration.

Social welfare review: Due to be delivered next month, this report on the treatment of beneficiaries including penalties and incentives has the potential to create tension between Labour and New Zealand First.

Prison reforms: The 2018 conference may have had some great ideas from which to construct a reform package to cut the prison population but getting the public onside is the challenge.

Karel Sroubek: National chipped away for months on the decision to grant and rescind citizenship for this convicted offender and they are not going to let up.

Prime Ministers have to deal with the bad as well as with the good PR.

And one of Ardern’s biggest challenges is to prove that she can walk the walk to live up to her own hype talk. That applies to her ministers and Government as well – this year they have to prove they can deliver on at least some of their promises.

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73 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  January 30, 2019

    PM Jacinda Ardern’s first press conference of 2019

    The Herald’s video of Jacinda and Robert’s press conference. Enjoy. I must say, full marks to the Herald for covering this. They seem to quite regularly post videos of Jacinda’s post cabinet pressers & if I’ve got the time I find them good to watch.

    Grant Robertson spoke for nearly half of this press conference after Jacinda outlined her schedule for this week.

    It was all about the report of the Financial Markets Authority and Reserve Bank into the insurance industry & how the government is going to regulate to keep the bastards honest (or words to that general effect.

    I was intrigued by the terminology he kept using. Everything was about their “customers” and “consumers”. Whatever happened to the good old days where they would say the Insurance companies are ripping off “New Zealanders”, especially “ordinary hardworking New Zealanders”.

    I hate being referred to as a consumer or customer in this context.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  January 30, 2019

      The insurance industry spokesperson was smooth and urbane. Heard him interviewed.

      Key phraseology.

      1- The report was ‘confronting.’
      2- Cultural norms and imperatives.
      3- Changes were already in progress.

      Hadn’t heard such a great performance since Bebe Holmes spun for the oil companies.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  January 30, 2019

        Reply
      • Duker

         /  January 30, 2019

        We should have action by the media , who tell stories on individuals who have been reamed by their named insurance company.

        Reply
      • Duker

         /  January 30, 2019

        Insurance industry must pay very very well if they have the smoothest most polished PR.
        But we knew that..

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  January 30, 2019

          I don’t mind being a customer in this context; client might be better, as customer sounds like a shopper.

          People must know that insurance co’s have to make a profit or they couldn’t continue.

          I am not a name-dropper, but when my insurance co was trying to give me as little as possible after a crash, it was very handy to know the then Minister of Consumer affairs and another one who had a great concern for these things and say that I did and would be contacting them…..

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  January 30, 2019

            Didn’t Aaron Gilmore get the push from Parliament for that sort of thing? 😳

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  January 30, 2019

              What sort of thing ?

              I wasn’t making threats, merely saying that I knew someone whom I would consult….it was true.

            • Duker

               /  January 30, 2019

              A company has got to make money ?

              NZ life insurance commissions 25%
              Australia 12%
              USA 9%

  2. Blazer

     /  January 30, 2019

    ‘ The Bolger report revisiting national awards has not yet been published but the campaign against it by employers has already begun’

    typical.

    Reply
    • David

       /  January 30, 2019

      Surely you wouldnt want national awards again, it’s time has long passed and arnt we better off with our good strong current employment legislation.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  January 30, 2019

        we don’t know the conclusions….yet to assess any implications.

        Reply
      • Duker

         /  January 30, 2019

        National awards would be a floor for wages by occupations. Large companies would still negotiate directy with employees just like it is in Australia
        Hasnt that underpinned their growth ?

        Reply
        • David

           /  January 30, 2019

          No, digging stuff up on a massive scale props up the Australian economy, allowing that to happen pretty much unhindered is why they have avoided the reforms that nearly every other country on earth has implemented.
          The only problem we seem to have here is migrant employers exploiting migrants which both governments seem quite happy to largely ignore. For 40 years employers and employees have managed to sit down and negotiate with one another without too many issues.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  January 30, 2019

            you in favour of zero hours contracts…too?

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  January 30, 2019

              If people who only want occasional work are happy to be ‘on call’, I can’t see why they shouldn’t have them.

  3. Corky

     /  January 30, 2019

    Under National solo mums were required to look for work after their children reached a certain age. Labour, it would seem, has not dropped that requirement, but boy, oh boy, have they sweetened the deal.

    My niece was required to attend a work refocus interview yesterday. Whether the following perks apply across the board I don’t know.

    1- She is required to work in a pack house from 6am to 11am. Because she has chosen the early morning shift she will receive an extra $100 p/w.
    2- Her van will receive a free full service.
    3- All childcare costs will be met by the state.
    4- All clothing costs ( for work) will be met by the state.
    5- She will receive free tuition to get her full driver licence.
    6- Her older child will get a special grant for after-school care should her hours of employment change.

    Her basic benefit entitlements will remain the same and she will transition back to a full benefit after the season ends.

    Good work..if you can get it.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  January 30, 2019

      are you failing as an inspiration to your whanau…’look at Uncle Corky, hes resourceful.smart and …rich.Lets be like Uncle Corky.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  January 30, 2019

        I don’t interfere in other peoples lives, Blazer. I’m not interested in being an inspiration to the whanau..or anyone else for that matter.

        I seem to have touched a nerve.. lay your troubles on this blog..let Uncle give you some sage advice. Maybe how to become a solo mum?😄

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  January 30, 2019

      Well, if that’s typical, that’s certainly an encouragement for young lasses to forget about school and get into professional solo mumming as soon as possible. :/

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  January 30, 2019

        I kid you not, Gezza. I have the notes. However, I have something wrong. The incentive for an early shift isn’t $100, it’s $200. Even though that is written in the tutors writing, I cannot believe it’s correct. I have told my niece to have it confirmed. I think this tutor may be on P.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  January 30, 2019

          $200 is probably less than the government has to spend to provide a seasonal imported worker … That’s a saving for US!

          Plus, a Kiwi gets a job and the government supports Hort without appearing to commit the unforgivable economic crime of ‘subsidizing’ New Zealand industry or the heinous neoliberal ‘atrocity’ of regional development … PLUS … a private-enterprise garage and child-care facility benefits servicing her van and her baby … and hopefully a Kiwi clothing company provides the work clothes …

          Wow … this is a win/win/win/win/win/win/win situation!!!

          If the Warehouse supplies imported clothes this ‘helps’ sweatshop labour both here and in a Third World *sh–h–e* somewhere … eventually raising the overseas workers via trickle down to the point where they can afford a ‘people smuggling’ boat trip to Australia or New Zealand …

          It also means the work clothes will have to be replaced more often!!!

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  January 30, 2019

            It’s a bit like ‘Long March Through Institutions’ … You’d think that if people had been “encouraged into professional solo mumming” there would be some who would eventually admit to it … kinda like ‘Whistleblowers’ … and I’ve never heard anyone do so …

            And we all know why she’s only working 5 hours a day … Her job is ‘casualized’ to relieve her employer of every possible expense associated with it.

            The ‘subsidies’ she’s being paid are her right. They are the “profits = unpaid wages” component of her earnings, collected as taxation on her employer’s profits, and given back to her … as is only fair and just … [except they’re probably nothing like the profit they make on each worker?]

            Reply
      • Corky

         /  January 30, 2019

        ”Professional solo mumming.”

        Yeah, you’d have to be an idiot to give this profession up. Even if it was just a full car service per year..that’s worth hundreds of dollars…and working 5 hours a day won’t be too taxing.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  January 30, 2019

          WINZ certainly keeps this quiet; there’s nothing like that on their website.

          They say that if you earn more than a certain amount, it’s taken off the benefit.

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  January 30, 2019

          Yes, well, I would keep this quiet. Wouldn’t look too good on top of an 11,00O increase
          in beneficiary numbers. We may now know why these numbers have skyrocketed.

          Just to make things clearer…the benefit is cut, but certain base entitlements are kept.
          I assume that would be accommodation supplements etc.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  January 30, 2019

            The ‘free car service’ doesn’t exist. They will lend up to $400 for urgent repairs, not things like WOFs or services, and the money has to be paid back.

            Anyone who thinks that they will be given all the things quoted above will be in for a very rude awakening indeed. Nobody can earn that amount and keep the full benefit.

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  January 30, 2019

              I told you what’s what. Do not comment on what you know nothing about.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  January 30, 2019

              I took it that WINZ knows what they are talking about, and they say that services, rego, WOFs and such routine things are NOT covered, only urgent repairs and the money has to be paid back. They specify what isn’t covered and also the amount of the loan; $400.

              Nor are they as generous financially as you imagine if their own website is to be believed.

              I am indeed commenting on something I know about. Look it up if you can’t believe me. Perhaps you’ll take WINZ’s word for it that all these free things and generous handouts don’t exist in reality.

            • Corky

               /  January 30, 2019

              ”Just to make things clearer…the benefit is cut, but certain base entitlements are kept.
              I assume that would be accommodation supplements etc.”

              Kitty:

              ”Nobody can earn that amount and keep the full benefit.”

              Yeah, I know. That’s what I wrote, to make things clearer for you to understand.

              Kitty:

              ”I am indeed commenting on something I know about. Look it up if you can’t believe me.”

              No need to look it up . I have the course induction notes. You don’t. Have you been to one of these inductions? The answer is ‘no.’

              So basically…what are you talking about? 🙄

    • Duker

       /  January 30, 2019

      Making it up Corky

      The free ‘full’ van service , like the $400 per day tree planting , is ‘too good to be true’.

      People in your station in life like to tell these stories ‘about their niece’ when in fact they are lifted from the internet, often US stories supposedly about migrants

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  January 30, 2019

        The voice of reason !

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  January 30, 2019

        Sorry, Duke. Just confirmed, $200 tax free..also new clothing for school uniform to be paid by Winz.

        I will give you the same advice I gave Kitty. Unless you know what you are talking about, which you don’t…like your post in World View.. it’s best to keep quiet.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  January 30, 2019

          You said that while she was working, her basic benefit would remain the same. It won’t.
          But suit yourself.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  January 30, 2019

            WINZ don’t pay for school uniforms; they may make a loan, which has to be paid back.

            They only pay for clothes needed for work, like work boots.

            They don’t pay transport costs to work; dream on. They may pay for transport to an interview.

            Someone who drives a van should have a license anyway, or they’re breaking the law.

            If someone doing packing is on the minimum wage + $8 an hour for an early shift, that’s $400 for 25 hours.

            Make up your mind if it’s the benefit or the extras that are cut.

            And accept that WINZ will not pay for a free service every year !

            Reply
          • Corky

             /  January 30, 2019

            If that makes you feel better, fine. Meanwhile in the real world.. It probably escapes you, that I as a taxpayer are pissed off about this largess because I’m paying for it. This will be the last time I bring any information like this to the blog.

            Just as well I made it up, eh? No worries then.🙄

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  January 31, 2019

              Well, as long as you admit that you made it up…you can’t be paying for things that don’t exist. WINZ has a website where you can check to see if the things you say about it (like the car service) bear any resemblance to reality.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  January 31, 2019

        Duker, Corky is rather touchy when he’s proved wrong, alas, as you will discover.

        Reply
  4. Gerrit

     /  January 30, 2019

    When matters get a bit to hard for Ardern, time for another baby opportunity rehash.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12198216

    Sickening to watch the MSM run interference for Ardern.

    Especially as the article is a rehash of a pre christmas mish mash about how everybody just loves the baby.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  January 30, 2019

      Hang on, I’ll have a look. 😐

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  January 30, 2019

        Simpering drivel. I had a quick scan & flagged it away. Most people probably would. It’s not compulsory to read that sort of trivia, you know, Gerrit. I think it’s important not get carried away with this sort of syrupy women’s magazine article.

        Reply
  5. sorethumb

     /  January 30, 2019

    I’ve been reading about “missionary nationalism”

    The early Blair years represented the flowering of a liberal-egalitarian nationalism in Britain. Though some charge liberal elites with being post-national, it’s more accurate to describe them as missionary nationalists. This is not a contradiction. When a country sees itself as blazing a trail for others to follow, or leading the world as the defender of a universal idea, it brings glory on itself. When the Soviet Union styles itself as the vanguard of socialism, America the leader of the free world , France the ‘Eldest Daughter’ of the Catholic Church or Saudi Arabia the guiding light of Islam, these countries are engaging in what scholars term ‘missionary nationalism. They may appear to be cosmopolitan, selflessly serving a transnational ideology, but they do so in part to court the approval of other nations and win glory for themselves.
    …….
    In Britain’s case, New Labour was showing the world that its country, centred on the globalist capital, London, was at the forefront of liberal cosmopolitanism. This lent British elites international prestige. Not only did their pride swell when they met counterparts from other Western countries, but it was bolstered even when their audience was .absent. As the social psychologist George Herbert Mead argues, our sell-esteem reflects the opinions of our ‘generalized other’, those we hold in high regard and deem to be judging us even when not physically present.’ In this sense, British liberals could bask in the glow of the imagined approval of their counterparts from around the world. New Labour advanced this form of nationalism prior to 2000.
    ………
    On a progressive reading, when a country succumbs to cultural nationalism at the expense of the national mission, it loses face in the court of international public opinion. Brexit induces a sense of shame among many British missionary nationalists. In their minds, the country is now associated with anti—cosmopolitanism and a betrayal of liberal values so it contributes negatively to their self-esteem. As a result, some British liberals seek to distance themselves from a British national identity in favour of a London or metropolitan identity with the places which voted to Remain. Alternatively, they join the fight to get the country back on its former missionary-liberal track. When it comes to immigration, liberals are prepared to sacrifice elements of the cultural particularity of their nation on the altar of the liberal mission. This relegates ascribed nationalism in favour of achieved nationalism: local particularity and domestic approval is lost, but global applause is gained. Both are forms of nationalism, but one is based on international adulationion advancing an ideal the other on intra-national recognition for exemplifying authentic cultural traits. Their intended audiences are different as are their social bases.
    White Shift – Erc Kaufman.

    You can see this with Helen Clarke and Jacinda Adernment.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  January 30, 2019

      a verbose load of inconsequential tosh.

      Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  January 30, 2019

        Blazing squirrels by heck…”a verbose load of inconsequential tosh.”

        In other words, what was written does not compute in the blazing squirrels comprehension.

        Reply
    • Gerrit

       /  January 30, 2019

      In other word, liberals seek external references for their well being over their own thoughts, needs and wants.

      Relying on external references leads to codependency.

      Scary to hear phrases like ” international prestige” and “court of international public opinion” as references for external influences.

      Reply
  6. Blazer

     /  January 30, 2019

    ‘“He was one of the numerous and varied legion of dullards, of half-animated abortions, conceited, half-educated coxcombs, who attach themselves to the idea most in fashion only to vulgarize it and who caricature every cause they serve, however sincerely.”
    ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  January 30, 2019

      Have you read the beginning of Fathers and Sons about the young man with the dyed hair, turquoise earring and the other things that could be written about many young men now ?

      Reply
  7. John Hurley

     /  January 30, 2019

    No society can do without norms; the challenge is to ensure they rest on a sound ethical foundation. with the degree of emotional dis-approval proportionate to the offence. We should express disapproval when someone suggests in casual conversation that mass murder is a good strategy for dealing with the poor. This said, the ethical foundations of taboos are often shaky. Expressing support for atheism in Pakistan today, homosexuality in Victorian England or communism in 1950s America activated taboos that lacked a sound ethical basis or a sense of proportion calibrated to the actual danger. What’s more, there should be a space — the university — where arguments are not forbidden and can be aired and discussed rationally. If conservative societies have dubious taboos, we shouldn’t be surprised to find that liberal societies have unjustified norms. In the culturally liberal societies of the West after the mid-1960s, the emotional regime shifted from outrage at violations of traditional values to disgust at transgressions of liberal ones. Taboos now protect liberal ideas. especially those that can draw a connection to race or, to a slightly lesser degree, gender. Conservative taboos still exist in the West: the refusal of the NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick to stand for the American national anthem was attacked as sacrilegious by outraged patriots. It’s still impossible for an American president to be an avowed atheist. Yet within society’s major cultural. economic and political institutions, norm violations increasingly consist of transgressions of liberal norms.
    THE MORALISTIC STYLE OF POLITICS
    Taboos are related to two concepts in the sociology of meaning: sacred/ profane and deviant/normal. Ideologues truly believe that an idea, such as anti-racism or Catholicism, is sacred, to the extent that anything that can be construed as racist must be censured. Others instrumentally deploy norms to discredit political opponents. Often the two motives overlap.4 Established powers like the Catholic hierarchy during the Spanish Inquisition, or challengers such as radical Islamists, with their heterodox ideas, understand what evolutionary psychologists have shown — that rational arguments alone rarely win the battle of ideas.’ Therefore both use moralistic politics — which triggers our unconscious disgust mechanism — to gain the upper hand. Established groups accuse those with new ideas of being heretics, stooges of enemy powers, or even agents of the devil. Challengers accuse the establishment of betraying religious principle or selling out the uncorrupted people. Within their ranks, both establishments and upstarts enforce orthodoxy through shaming and excommunication. Established and insurgent groups alike harness the power of herding, in which people fear to speak against orthodoxy lest this draw attention to themselves and make them a target. Pointing the finger at deviants signals virtue and loyalty to the group, endowing the accuser with a sense of moral superiority. At times, these emotional mechanisms set off a spiral in which fear of heretics or the desire to avoid being accused leads to further accusations, which increases fear, multiplying the number of accusations, which results in a witch-hunt. The frenzy also serves the function of providing an internal scapegoat to unify a group against. The Inquisition, beginning in tenth-century Europe, is the most famous example of this dynamic, torturing suspected heretics and setting off a spate of moral panics. ‘Crimes’ committed by deviants are either evidence-free or grossly exaggerated.’ The Terror following the French Revolution, the Stalinist Show Trials of the 1930s, McCarthyism in the 1950s and Mao’s Cultural Revolution of the 1960s show how secular versions of the process operate. Splits within challenger movements such as the 1970s British left (satirized by Monty Python in the cr` People s Front of Judea’ skit in Life of Brian) or Irish republicanism (I once visited an ‘Official’ IRA pub, commemorating some of those killed by the ‘Provisional’ IRA) may lead to similar purges or assasinations. There are moral struggles within groups and across society as a whole. A Danish anthropologist, Agner Fog, speaks of a battle between established social forces which use regalization to enforce a moral order by censuring upstarts as deviants; the accused resist the charges in an attempt at ‘kalyptization’, to ascend the moral high ground[7]

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 30, 2019

      Arguably, ethical and to a much lesser extent ‘moral’ norms are generally good and healthy … compared, for instance, to the ‘amoral’ or immoral dictatorship of monetary, economic and financial norms …

      Reply
  8. The Consultant

     /  January 30, 2019

    her status as a rising star on the international stage.
    ….
    unlike her wowing of international media on her trip to the UK and Europe.

    I hardly ever attend to the NZ MSM, but read foreign MSM reasonably regularly and widely – and I’ve seen little to nothing about this “rising star” on their newscasts and websites.

    Perhaps some links would help to demonstrate this “wowing”. I imagine The Guardian would be gaga, but surely this star power has spread more widely than those Lefty sycophants for the above statements to be true?

    Reply
  9. High Flying Duck

     /  January 30, 2019

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  January 30, 2019

      And how many cars did Crusher Collins have destroyed before giving up completely?

      THREE!

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  January 30, 2019

        Because that is totally the same thing…

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  January 30, 2019

          well National did ‘crush’ alot of state housing.

          Reply
        • Duker

           /  January 30, 2019

          No its not the same thing .
          Collins is now nationals spokeswoman for Housing. So we can look back at her achievements to see how HER numbers look like when she was in government.

          After that tour de force , she just said the problem was now solved – something those people plagued by these boy racer pests would be very surprised at.

          She not too different to Nationals previous Housing supremo , Paula ‘ knocking on windows’ Bennett.
          Are you going to say that ‘solution’ from national was ‘not the same thing’

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  January 30, 2019

            “Paula Bennett has owned up to wrongly advising John Key that welfare officials and the Salvation Army had visited people living in cars.

            The Prime Minister last week said “MSD and the Sallies went around and knocked on, I think, eight cars that they could find. All eight of those people refused to take support either from Sallies or from MSD.”

            The Salvation Army issued a statement saying it actually declined the Ministry of Social Development’s invitation to accompany its officials.

            “MSD officials did not accompany Salvation Army social personnel to Bruce Pulman Park last Monday night as part of the army’s regular visits to the site,” it said. – Newshub

            To be honest it sounds like something Keys office and Bennett cooked up to make Johnno look good.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  January 30, 2019

              typical Bennett…’the flying squad’….truth and her are strangers.

  10. Gerrit

     /  January 30, 2019

    Stuff now too running interference for Ardern with a similar pre christmas fluff baby piece and womens weekly cover as the Herald run this morning.

    Has the MSM no shame?

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/parenting/mums-life/110255256/jacinda-ardern-our-new-life-with-neve

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  January 30, 2019

      They covered the sale of John Key’s Parnell Mansion … What’s the problem?

      Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  January 30, 2019

        No problems, just odd that while the sale of Key’s house was covered in the MSM on or just after the day it happened, these very similar fluff pieces have their origins 6 weeks ago and each feature a “family” video of baby and parents with a a Ardern adorned womens weekly cover from the same vintage just below.

        Hardly topical.

        Labour communications team in action or lazy journalists and beholden editors?

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  January 30, 2019

          wake up Gerrit …Key and his offspring were in our face 24/7.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  January 30, 2019

            Not as young kids they werent.
            Bridges has done many photo shoots ‘ at home’ with his new baby , wife other kids.
            This is why Bridges is seen as dropkick , he doesnt do it the kiwi way

            Reply
        • Duker

           /  January 30, 2019

          A shot takaen at the airport ? Compare to a multipage spread ‘at Home with Soimun and Baby’

          Reply
    • Duker

       /  January 30, 2019

      Firstly its a story lifted ‘republished with permission’ from Australian Womans weekly

      And its got NO new photos, no exclusives , like Bridges gets the photographers in and gushes to the writer…well his wife does all that , shamelessly exploiting their very young kids for political gain , that Key and English never did.
      One photo looks like it was taken at the airport. Another wqs the Vogue photo shoot some time back

      Reply
  11. High Flying Duck

     /  January 30, 2019

    I guess Jacinda didn’t “wow” them as much as we thought:

    “The European Union’s parliament has taken a decisive step towards unilaterally reducing New Zealand’s rights to export specified quantities of tariff-free sheepmeat, beef and dairy products to the trading bloc if and when Brexit occurs.

    The move has been slammed as “outrageous” by former trade negotiator Charles Finny in a Tweet and “disappointing” by the Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand.

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said the proposed moves risk compounding “growing international economic uncertainty and rising trade tensions”.”

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12198590

    Reply
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