“Racism toward Māori is compounded by fat-shaming”

 

Māori are over-represented in a number of negative statistics like poor health, life expectancy, tobacco use, unemployment, imprisonment and obesity. Is this a result of some form of racism?

How can these negative outcomes be addressed without it being seen as racism?

Should efforts to address alarming levels of obesity be referred to as ‘fat-shaming’? If so, is it a form of racism?

The latest obesity statistics from the NZ Health Survey 2017-18:

  • About 101,000 children aged 2–14 years (12.4%) were obese.
  • 1.26 million adults (32%) were obese, up from 27% in 2006/07.
  • Children living in the most socio-economically deprived neighbourhoods were 2.1 times as likely to be obese as children living in the least deprived neighbourhoods, after adjusting for age, sex and ethnic differences.

Obese: BMI of 30.0 or greater 15-17 years:

  • All – 32.2%
  • Māori – 47.5%
  • Pacific Island – 65%
  • Asian – 15.1%
  • European/Other – 30.7%

Obese: BMI of 30.0 or greater 2-14 years:

  • All – 12.4%
  • Māori – 16.9%
  • Pacific Island – 30%
  • Asian – 7.0%
  • European/Other – 9.8%

Māori are well above average in both age groups, but Pacific Islanders, who are not indigenous, are far more likely to be classified as obese. Is this another sign of racism? Asian are the least obese group so is racism only targeting some racial groups?

Or is the physiology of Pacific islanders and Māori more likely to end up inj obesity with modern diets?

RNZ:  Is ‘fat-shaming’ racist?

Research by Dr Isaac Warbrick from the Auckland University of Technology has found many weight loss-centred public healthcare initiatives frame Māori as unproductive.

Mr Warbrick is the lead author of the paper The shame of fat-shaming in public health: moving past racism to embrace indigenous solutions. It has been published in the international Public Health journal.

“In New Zealand, weight remains the primary focus for health interventions targeting Māori, with limited mention of psychological, spiritual or whānau wellbeing,” he said.

He said societal and institutional racism needed to be challenged in the areas of nutrition, physical activity and weight loss.

“Rather than improving health outcomes for Māori, weight and weight loss-centred approaches may actually cause harm,” Mr Warbrick said.

Fat was also a racism issue, he noted.

“Just as sexism-related stigma is compounded by weight anxiety, racism toward Māori is compounded by fat-shaming,” Mr Warbrick said.

“Long before we reached the current alarming level of obesity, Māori were stigmatised, like many other colonised peoples, because of the colour of their skin, their beliefs and culture.

“Stigma is nothing new to Māori, so when we are told that we are fat and less productive because of our fatness, we are not surprised because we have been told the same thing, albeit for different reasons, for generations.”

The paper examines perceptions of weight and racism towards Māori, New Zealand’s policy and practice regarding weight, and proposed indigenous solutions.

“We need indigenous-led solutions informed by indigenous knowledge.”

Perhaps ‘indigenous solutions‘ would also help Pacific Island obesity.

So called fat-shaming and claims of racism portray Māori as victims of non-indigenous lifestyles and of obesity. I don’t know whether convincing people they are victims is a good way to help them lead better lifestyles and reduce obesity. It may hinder encouraging self-responsibility.

Labels such as racism and fat-shaming could be adding to ‘poor me’ syndrome – or probably more accurately, ‘poor them’ syndrome.

I’d rather see more focus on positive solutions, and less of an obsession with claiming victimhood.

To check your BMI: Healthy Weight BMI Calculator


UPDATE: this from Stuff combines Maori and Pacific Islanders under the fat shame label:  The stigma of a system that ‘fat shames’ Māori and Pasifika people

Western medicine says many Māori and most Pasifika people are obese. Some people are angry about the system that ‘fat-shames’ them in this way. Others are focused on finding solutions that actually work. Carmen Parahi reports.

“The health sector and the measures they’re using for Māori and PI is not working. They don’t take into consideration our culture. Everything they’re doing to combat obesity is not going to work.”

“Anyone that’s overweight there’s a stigma. They’re lazy, they make their own bad choices, it’s their fault they’re fat, their fault they’re sick,” says Warbrick.

“We’re so focused on weight, it’s not working. The stats show obesity keeps going up even though we focus on this issue.

“Why are we measuring it? If it does harm, drives all this anxiety why measure it at all? It’s not solving the problem.”

Warbrick links the stigma attached to obesity to racism.

“When we’re talking about racism we’re talking about someone looking different. Therefore you make all these judgements.”

“The reason we’re overweight and have these health issues is not because we’re Māori or Pasifika it’s because we’re in an environment we have to live in.”

He agrees individuals need to take responsibility for their own health. But Māori patients told researchers they’re being treated differently by health professionals and not respected.

 

Leave a comment

72 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  1st February 2019

    not forgetting ‘bucktooth shaming’,’clubfoot shaming’….and….

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  1st February 2019

      ..freckle shaming…big nose shaming…bitten fingernail shaming….

      Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  1st February 2019

    Is “public health” an utterly misconceived socialist failure?

    A healthy culture and economy supports healthy people. Welfare traps don’t.

    Reply
  3. David

     /  1st February 2019

    Fat shaming should be encouraged, not the racist sort. There are folk wandering around in appalling condition eating themselves to death, they should be embarrassed to the point they ditch the cakes and get active.
    We have a few start at the gym and I take my hat off to them putting in the effort in an intimidating environment its just a shame very few of them see it the whole way through.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  1st February 2019

      I don’t hang around the supermarket gawping at other people and their purchases, but it’s hard not to notice when someone has a trolley full of things like crisps and soft-drinks, especially if that person is obese.

      I can’t see how that can be put down to racism and having to live in the environment etc etc (excuses, excuses)

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  1st February 2019

        So, in other words you had a gawp. Did those people catch you gawping? Or were you discrete ? You have past the first test of becoming an ‘active observer.’ Next, you must look for brown patchy discoloured skin on their shins or neck area. That gives an indication they are diabetic.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st February 2019

          No, I wasn’t ‘discrete’; I remained in one piece. Nor am I an ‘active observer’ in your sense; I don’t gawp and look into other people’s grocery trolleys; I have more interesting things to think about than the colour of some stranger’s avocadoes and such yawn-making things. That’s not why most of us go to the supermarket. Other people don’t peer into my trolley to see what’s in there.

          When a trolley next to one at the packing table is piled so high that the items are over its top, one sees the contents without actually needing to gawp, which I wouldn’t do anyway; I’m not that hard up for something to do and think about.

          What sort of person would stare at a stranger’s neck and shins ? How disgusting and intrusive. I am surprised that you haven’t been given a trespass notice, if you do that sort of thing as well as looking up skirts when the wearer bends over. That’s really pervy.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st February 2019

          That isn’t an indication of diabetes; but if someone catches you breathing down their neck as you gape at their skin or bending to stare at their legs, I would imagine that they would (rightly) take exception to this.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st February 2019

          There is a difference between NOTICING and GAWPING; one is hard to avoid unless one is blind or extremely unobservant. The other means rudely staring with eyes sticking out like organ stops. When I buy petfood, I notice that other people are doing so, but I don’t memorise what they buy, standing there open-mouthed with eyes nearly falling out of my head….

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  1st February 2019

          Yes..quite!!

          ”That isn’t an indication of diabetes; but if someone catches you breathing down their neck as you gape at their skin or bending to stare at their legs, I would imagine that they would (rightly) take exception to this.”

          That needs a little work and study. Start with deleting the hyperbole. If you can’t see discoloured skin on necks and shins from 3 meters away…you need to get rid of those cheap reading glasses and save your bingo money to buy a real pair of glasses.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  1st February 2019

            “The story is told that when Corky was a child his cousins emptied his Christmas stocking and replaced the gifts with horse manure.Corky took one look and bolted for the door, eyes glittering with excitement. ‘Wait, Corky, where are you going? What did ol’ Santa bring you?’ According to the story Corky paused at the door for a piece of rope. ‘Brought me a bran’-new pony but he got away. I’ll catch ’em if I hurry.’ And ever since then it seemed that Corky had been accepting more than his share of hardship as good fortune, and more than his share of shit as a sign of Shetland ponies just around the corner, Thoroughbred stallions just up the road.”
            ― Ken Kesey,

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  1st February 2019

              Thanks for that, Blazer. People call you a one trick pony…with your only worth being a pinata for more gifted posters.

              I disagree. That above was a good effort. Keep it up..otherwise you know where you will wind up.😃

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st February 2019

              That is a symptom of something else, not diabetes. I have known a few diabetics, and they didn’t have the skin condition…look it up.

            • Corky

               /  1st February 2019

              Oh, Blazer. What is the meaning of this fairytale you have written?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st February 2019

              Don’t assume that because you’re old enough to play bingo, that dullest of mindless games for oldies, that other people have nothing better to do. Spare me.

            • Corky

               /  1st February 2019

              65 -Old Age Pension
              63 -Tickle Me 63
              😂👍

  4. Trevors_Elbow

     /  1st February 2019

    Oh ffs….. I know a lot Maori. And a lot of them are just not obese or even close. They are athletes – but some are not, they’re well paid professionals – but some are tradies or work on diggers or factories or doing standard office jobs, they come from poor suburbs mostly (like I did). And they are doing just fine – they are proud of their culture but they live in the modern world and most don’t make a fetish of the Maori heritage (that seems reserved for ToW gravvy trainers, Government workers and Academics the rest get on with their life with shove tikanga down your throat)

    But there is a sub culture in Maori society which has major problems…. and I’ll give you a clue they are not the rangitira class/whanau’s…. its the bottom of Maori society….. the ones who were the bottom of Maori society pre 1840…. and they were just club fodder/foot soldiers back then and now they are a political football for Tinorangatiratanga activists and their academic fellow travellers…..

    BMI frankly is a little bit bullshit. It assumes the body shape is reed like… kiwis play rugby, which promotes broad muscle mass… ffs R McCaw, a supreme athlete, is overweight on BMI metrics… me at 24, standing 6’2″ and weighing in at 88Kgs after a one year aerobic intense training regime at 12 percent body fat… was overweight on BMI…

    Yes we have a problem with body fat in NZ. and it is a simple diet issue and a more sedantry lifestyle than 50 years ago – it sticks out like a sore thumb if you look at newsreels and TV programmes form 1960’s and 1970’s how much thinner people in western societies were on average

    Its a general population issue its not Maori bashing but there is a big problem in Maori than the general population – the stats show it…. stop whining and blaming ‘racism’ or PCSD or any other academic bs. Get out in to the poor parts of Maori society and get the youngsters in to school home ec rooms or Wharekai’s on Marae’s and teach them proper food prep and diet choices…. plenty of Maori teachers who would volunteer surely???

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  1st February 2019

      interesting post Trev.
      Now we know your age,I can see why you know everything worth knowing.

      Reply
      • Trevors_Elbow

         /  1st February 2019

        Did I say I am 24 or me at 24? – could have been last year, 10 years ago, could have been 1984. Stop trying to decipher who people are and focus on what they are saying…. The only low calorie comment knowitall on here is you. Parti strikes me as slight unhinged at times but at least Parti introduces so fully formed ideas and theories – way beyond your normal ‘Key was a man as were his ministers” bs…

        Reply
    • David

       /  1st February 2019

      12% body fat ! I workout 5 days a week and cant get below 21%…I am fat and useless

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  1st February 2019

        How much cardio do you do?

        Reply
      • Trevors_Elbow

         /  1st February 2019

        David – if you are over 30/35 you need to do a few of things. Walk a lot – cut down on the size of your meals and reduce your carb intake plus do weights. The weights will boost muscle mass which burns more calories, that coupled with lowered carbs will burn fat.

        when I got to 12% BF I was much younger and really driven – every second day a 2 hour work out with severe cycling and rowing on top of resistance training. I couldn’t do that work out now…. but I have dropped body fat by following the above regime – walk, weights and better quality diet…

        Reply
        • I hit 124kg last year and was inspired to start Ketogenic, which is a bit beyond low carb, with no exercise I hit 107 in 3 months, xmas and work ruined me for january, so back to 112 and starting back on keto again, this time adding exercise.

          Anecdotally, the bigger you are, the more effective the Keto diet is.
          Its a trade off though, the delicious sugar-free snacks like bacon are full of nitrites, so trading heart disease for increased bowel cancer risks…

          Reply
          • PDB

             /  1st February 2019

            Still a good effort & well down on your peak weight. Just gotta get back on that horse again and again regardless of any lapses/ setbacks.

            Reply
          • Trevors_Elbow

             /  1st February 2019

            I maxed out at 125 down to 111 bounced to 116 now at 114/115 and starting to go lower. 105 is the target for this year. Being below 100k for me is pretty much a pipe dream but would be fantastic if I could get there and stay there…

            Good effort Shane – really good effort…

            Reply
            • Go Keto, sub 100 is doable within the year man, but the frozen cokes for $1 at maccas are too much to resist in this heatwave……

              I was inspired by a friend who lost 40kg in 6 months to give it a crack,

              I aim for sub 100 this year, with a realistic long term target of 95 which is still “overweight”

        • David

           /  1st February 2019

          I am 51 and have a personal trainer, do weights every day and cardio at the end of most sessions except bloody leg day and generally do an hour plus 5 days a week.
          I try and have 6 meals a day and eat pretty well,halving my alcohol intake helped but I am plateaued at the moment.

          Reply
    • Griff.

       /  1st February 2019

      I have spent my entire life on the margin of what is considered obese according to the BMI.
      I have never been “fat” I just naturally have a heaver build and more muscle mass for my height than average.
      Polynesians are genetically predisposed to exceed BMI even when lean and mean. For the BMI metric to be used it must be modified to take into account your build on an individual level and the genetic differences between races.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  1st February 2019

        When you aren’t trolling you can actually write some solid stuff that doesn’t make me laugh, Griff.

        ”For the BMI metric to be used it must be modified to take into account your build on an individual level and the genetic differences between races.”

        And that’s the problem. Doctors are provided with weight charts that allows for no other
        influencing factors. You see these charts posted in prominent positions in doctors surgeries .

        Our local hospital has one above their ”truck stop scales.” Scales that can measure up to 700kgs. The patient crane is parked next to the scales.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st February 2019

          700kg is about 110 stone. Why would they need scales that go up to that ?

          Reply
      • PDB

         /  1st February 2019

        Regardless of BMI it is obvious when in areas such as South Auckland that there is an obesity crisis within the Maori/ Pacific Island communities. We are talking majorly obese people, the number of which has skyrocketed since around the 1990’s. Even in other groups obesity is on the rise.

        Reply
  5. Corky

     /  1st February 2019

    Fat shaming Maori…lol. I invite anyone to walk up to a Maori and make him/her feel ashamed..or even care..about their obesity. It’s you who will come away feeling less than adequate.

    ”Or is the physiology of Pacific islanders and Māori more likely to end up in obesity with modern diets?”

    Unfortunately food in Polynesian society was the gold standard other people would judge you by. Feeding guests was one of the most important things you could do..still is. Maybe that’s why Maori have a love affair with food?

    To me it boils down to individual choice. I know many skinny Maori. Why aren’t they obese? Has colonisation made them thin?

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  1st February 2019

      maybe they don’t like Maccas or..KFC.

      Reply
    • Ray

       /  1st February 2019

      The thin Māori are smokers?
      May be but the ones down here, most of whom are related to me, are on average thinner than me and when I had my last check up losing weight was not mentioned, rather my length of life apparently was shortened because my young sister had had a stroke in her 50s, she I might add smoked like a chimney while I never have.

      Reply
  6. PartisanZ

     /  1st February 2019

    Institutional and everyday racism can be extremely subtle as well as quite blatant …

    It’s worth looking at how the language of public health is framed … Are we measuring and ‘judging’ Maori and Pasifika people purely by Pakeha standards?

    As Griff comments, it’s worth looking at both individual and group or ethnic differences too …

    Reply
    • Trevors_Elbow

       /  1st February 2019

      No we are judging them by their Mortality stats parti. They die earlier and cardio-vascular disease and diabetes are key causes.

      Beat your normal ‘racist’, ‘anti-maori’ drum all you like -“Pakeha standards”. But they end up in coffins earlier on average and poor diet and consequent excess weight play a key role…

      I have lost to old rugby team mates, one a Samoan and the other Maori. Both stack on weight both die in their 40’s which is waaay to young….

      Maths and Stats aren’t racist they are factual….. Healthy lifestyles are healthy lifestyles…

      Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  1st February 2019

    I annoyed ma driving her up to the AA at Cobham Court yesterday to renew her driver’s licence yesterday. “There’s a lot of fat girls around today” I said to her. Which is not something I’d normally even notice, let alone comment on. But there were. More than usual. Maybe noticeable because it’s been so hot they’re wearing skimpy clothing, I dunno.

    But they were all Pakehas, coincidentally. They were just visibly overweight.

    Several Maori came in to the AA while we were there (we got held up, ma’s doctor had absent-mindedly written 2018 as the year of her physical exam last week – she’s 92 this month, so has to have one every two years; the counter assistant was Maori, she & ma were getting along like BFFs so she rang AA Central & got approval to phone our Med Centre reception & confirm the date was wrong & ma got her licence).

    Anyway, whatever, my main point is none of the several Maori people I saw in Porirua were fat. In the Food Court at North City Plaza most of the overweight adults I noticed were Pakeha, & female, though there were quite a few visibly overweight pre-teen boys of all ethnicities, & fewer overweight girls of the same age, curiously.

    Fat parents often had fat kids with them.

    But more Pacific Islanders looked overweight at the in the plaza than any other group, & several seriously so. It’s diet & culture, I think. I recall seeing Barbara Dreaver on 1ewes at 6 a few years back doing an item on the King of Tonga who was introducing measures to reduce the level of obesity in Tonga because so many of his people were so overweight it was impacting too many of them with obesity related conditions like heart attacks, diabetes, & renal failure consequent upon the former.

    Three problems specifically mentioned as contributors to the problem were:
    1. Traditionally fat women were considered more desirable than slim or just average-size ones for some reason
    2. After a couple of centuries of importing cheap, fatty & canned low-grade meats New Zealanders no longer eat these have made their way into what are now considered to traditional foods there; more of it is regularly eaten there than, say fresh vegetables & fish, & it is very hard to persuade Tongans to abandon it
    3. The culture is to provide & share food at any and every event or on visiting friends & family & to provide a lot of it.

    I once went into the whanau room at Welly hospital to make myself a coffee while visiting dad & a Pacific Island family of about 10 visiting a sick relative had taken it over. There was home-cooked food everywhere; it took up all the bench space & the large, long coffee table & several family members were holding picnic containers as well.

    They very kindly said to me “Have some food, have some food”, & I thanked them but said I’d just had lunch. A lot of the food was fatty, it included noodles, & other zero-nutrition stuff. So I do think these factors are still responsible for much of the PI community’s overweight problem.

    My late wife’s kidneys failed & she needed to go on dialysis in her last year. The biggest group of people on dialysis in Welly were Pacific Islanders; the level obesity causes a lot of diabetes & failing to manage their diabetes leads to renal failure. It was, & I think still is, a major problem for their communities here.

    The health professionals were passionate about trying to get PI people to change their diet because of these health problems. It’s not racism; it’s concern for their well-being at the professional level, & concern for the cost of treatment & pressure on the free health services at the management level. Dialysis is very expensive & renal failure that is obesity-related is preventable.

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  1st February 2019

      Yes, I too see a lot of obese European women about (more than I used to see), normally feeding their kids breakfast down at the local bakery consisting of milkshakes/ frappé with shitloads of cream on top, fried chicken & chips/pie and often something sweet as a side dish.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  1st February 2019

      Damn fine reportage. This caught my eye:

      ”After a couple of centuries of importing cheap, fatty & canned low-grade meats New Zealanders no longer eat ”

      .They sell such meats in my supermarket in 20kg pails. It’s called Misi..something or other. Hell, even Maori don’t eat it.

      Also ”Bully Beef” like products have some of the worst preservatives known to mankind, added. That’s a double whammy for Islanders who consume such products.

      Reply
      • phantom snowflake

         /  1st February 2019

        The shittiest corned beef which is marketed to Samoans is known as “Povi Masima.” (Literally, “Salted Cow”>)

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  1st February 2019

          That’s the one. Red brine with bits of white fat bobbing around.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  1st February 2019

            Erghhhh….do you open up containers in the supermarket and look in ? Be careful about that; they may make you pay for it, and fair enough, too. Don’t they have those tamper-proof lids ?

            Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st February 2019

          We couldn’t have been importing cheap, fatty meat for 200 years before we stopped eating it; that would make it go back to before tinned food was invented if we supposedly stopped eating it even a few decades ago.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  1st February 2019

            Yes you’re probably right, I should have a said a century or so. It will probably have started from around the time NZ took over administration of Samoa from the Germans during WW1.

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  1st February 2019

              I would assume we all figured that out..apart from one.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st February 2019

              You, of course. Well, now you know something that you didn’t know before.

            • Corky

               /  1st February 2019

              You know what they say about the first person to smell a fart?

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  1st February 2019

        That they know that you have walked in ?

        They don’t sell that sort of corned beef at New World, and I would find it very hard to believe that it would be in a transparent bucket, as we call them in NZ, if they did. It would need to be very strong to hold 20kg; like a paint bucket.

        Reply
  8. High Flying Duck

     /  1st February 2019

    I thought middle-aged white men were the only group you could (and should on every possible occasion) shame these days?
    Oh, and gingers. Always gingers.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  1st February 2019

      mingers…

      Reply
    • phantom snowflake

       /  1st February 2019

      Religious conservatives like your boy Simeon Brown are valid targets too.

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  1st February 2019

        Religious conservatives will generally fit in to the middle aged white guy category, but yes you are correct.
        Unless they aren’t Christians, because then it becomes a hate crime and needs to be called out.

        Reply
  9. A horrible solution idea, Fast food staff could take on a role similar to bouncers at the clubs.

    Bouncers keep drunk people out,
    FF Staff refuse to serve the obese……

    Reply
  10. David in Aus

     /  1st February 2019

    The main problem is the lack of fat shame.

    The Japanese are the least obese because of the shame of being fat. There is little shame in being fat in the Pacific Island community. You are more likely to be teased for being a healthy weight- “put some meat on your bones”. The French are slim, not because of their fat-rich diet and red wine but of the social stigma of being fat. There was a bestseller written about this phenomenon amongst French Women.

    Asian families are the first to say to each other- your getting fat. There is no beating about the bush. In NZ European culture, extreme offence is taken when the obvious is pointed out.

    When everybody in your community is either obese or overweight is fat-shaming even a thing?

    Reply
    • David in Aus

       /  1st February 2019

      Correction: it should be ” you’re getting fat” not “your getting fat”.

      Reply
    • Blazer

       /  1st February 2019

      ‘The Japanese are the least obese because of the shame of being fat.’

      big fat Sumo wrestlers are admired and extremely popular in …Japan!

      Reply
      • David in aus

         /  1st February 2019

        People sees Sumo wrestlers as freaks of nature and not as aspirational body types. I think your perceptions are a bit off.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  1st February 2019

          ‘Enthusiastic young female fans provided a breath of fresh air for the sumo world in 2017, which once again finds itself reeling in the wake of a scandal.

          The women, nicknamed sujo, short for sumo joshi (sumo girls), exchange information through Instagram and other social media, showing their fervent support for wrestlers in Japan’s ancient national sport, whether they be big names or lower in the ranks.

          SuJo, who use their smartphones to take photos of the wrestlers, or rikishi, while waiting outside sumo arenas, even show interest in the gyōji (referees), the yobidashi, ushers who announce the names of wrestlers, and those called on to sweep the raised ring.

          They are part of a growing audience and the driving force behind the six sellout crowds at sumo tournaments in 2017 — something not seen in 21 years. This was despite the fact that an allegation of assault by now-retired yokozuna Harumafuji emerged during the final tournament of the year.’

          Referring to today’s young female fans, Kamisawa said, “They are interested in the cultural aspects such as the national sport’s beauty of form, which is something I had in common with them while in my 20s.”-Japan Times

          Reply
          • David in Aus

             /  1st February 2019

            I did not know there were these fan groups trying to emulate the body shape of sumo wrestlers were so mainstream and not niche. Because they love the fat aesthetic.

            Is that what you are saying? Or are you saying that there are people who love the sport of sumo, which seems self-evident in a country like Japan.

            Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  1st February 2019

      Oh God yes … There’s nothing I want more than to live in a completely ‘shame-based’ society like the Japan you are describing … Shall we reinstate the Bushido code too?

      Will me shame politicians for lying and cheating us?

      Reply
      • David in aus

         /  1st February 2019

        The shame based culture in Japan is a bit much, i agree. But degrees of shame does have its purpose. It suggests norms of societal behaviour and it regulates society to some degree.
        We have reduced people spitting in the streets and drink driving by utilizing this social stigmas.
        You can always go too far, but fat acceptance is totally destructive to population health.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  1st February 2019

          So, let me get this straight … In the neoliberal cult of individual freedom we care about “population health” … why?

          I guess it impacts upon the individual’s personal freedom to pay less tax, Right?

          A ‘shame campaign’ about spitting in public must have been before my time, but I certainly don’t see ‘anti-drink driving’ and its ubiquitous liquor-industry-sponsored corollary ‘anti-drug driving’ as being primarily shaming campaigns …

          Yes, you can always go too far … and shaming, by any contemporary measure I know of, is precisely that … ALWAYS going too far … and a very poor ‘weapon’ in the public education arsenal …

          Reply
          • david in aus

             /  1st February 2019

            Because we care about our neighbours as human beings and future generations. For non-ideologues, not everything is about “Neoliberalism”.

            If you want economic justification, think about the cost savings with our universal health system. But that is a reductionist one-dimensional view on life.

            Reply
          • david in aus

             /  1st February 2019

            That is your perception, many smokers see Stop-Smoking campaigns are about making lepers of smokers. It is about shame and social pressure.

            Drink-driving ads: “don’t be an idiot…..” ” mates don’t let mates drive drunk……”
            Aren’t those campaigns about social pressure?

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  2nd February 2019

              Ah yes … the delicate and not-so-delicate differences between “social pressure” and “shaming” …

      • PartisanZ

         /  1st February 2019

        Will “we” shame politicians for lying to and cheating us?

        Courts of Ethics wouldn’t be such a bad idea though … but “fat shaming” would either be way, way down their list of issues or off the table completely …

        There are much better things to apply ethics to!

        Reply
  1. “Racism toward Māori is compounded by fat-shaming” — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s