Manafort ‘repeatedly and brazenly’ violated law

The Robert Mueller investigation has filed a new sentencing memo for Paul Manafort, saying he ” chose repeatedly and knowingly to violate the law”, with leniency unlikely as it was found that Manafort lied to investigators after making a plea deal.

CNBC: Ex-Trump campaign boss Paul Manafort could get 22 years in prison, special counsel Mueller says in massive 800-page filing

  • Paul Manafort could get nearly 22 years in prison when he is sentenced next month in just one of his criminal cases, special counsel Robert Mueller said in a court filing unsealed Saturday.
  • The special counsel called for a stiff sentence, highlighting his “bold” criminal actions and extensive pattern of deceit that “remarkably went unabated even after indictment.”
  • But Mueller did not recommend that Judge Amy Berman Jackson impose a particular prison sentence on the longtime Republican operative.

Fox News:  Mueller sentencing memo says Manafort ‘repeatedly and brazenly’ violated law

FBI special counsel Robert Mueller’s office accused former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort of “repeatedly and brazenly” violating the law, according to a redacted sentencing memo filed on Friday in a Washington court.

“Manafort committed an array of felonies for over a decade, up through the fall of 2018,” the memo says. “Manafort chose repeatedly and knowingly to violate the law — whether the laws proscribed garden-variety crimes such as tax fraud, money laundering, obstruction of justice, and bank fraud, or more esoteric laws that he nevertheless was intimately familiar with, such as the Foreign Agents Registration Act.”

Manafort pleaded guilty in September to two counts of conspiring stemming from his Ukrainian political consulting work. As part of a plea deal in the case, Manafort admitted to one count of conspiracy against the United States and one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice.

The memo filed Friday also said that some of his crimes were particularly “bold” as some were committed “while under a spotlight due to his work as the campaign chairman and, later, while he was on bail from this Court.” It goes on to allege that “Manafort represents a grave risk of recidivism” if released from jail.

Prosecutors aren’t expected to recommend leniency because a judge found earlier this month that Manafort lied to investigators after agreeing to cooperate. They are not taking a position about whether the sentence should run consecutively or concurrently with the separate punishment that Manafort faces in a bank and tax fraud case in Virginia. In that case, where Manafort was convicted on eight counts of bank and tax fraud, Mueller’s team recommended a sentence of up to 24 years in prison and as much as a $24 million fine.

It is thought likely Manafort will effectively get a virtual life sentence. He is 69 years old.

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8 Comments

  1. David

     /  24th February 2019

    Manafort was fired be Reagan as was Stone on his campaign. He was fired pretty quickly by Trumps campaign but they should never have taken him on in the first place.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th February 2019

      he was playing a major role in Trumps campaign well before he was on the payroll from Feb 2016 and wasnt till late Jun that Trump ‘fired’ his campaign Chairman Lewandowski and Manafort got the job. Earlier that same month the meeting in Trump tower with a Russian lawyer took place , Manafort was there which shows how close his was the top Trump people before officially becoming Chairman

      Reply
    • Paul Manafort joined the Trump presidential campaign in March 2016 and worked there until late August the same year.

      But Manafort has associated with Roger Stone and Trump for over 30 years, long before the presidential campaign.

      Given the poor reputation that Manafort has had in Washington for most of that time, you’re quite right, David. The campaign should never have taken him on in the first place.

      It was very poor judgement for then-Candidate Trump to have ever considered Manafort… either that, or Trump knew exactly who he was inviting on board his ship, and brought Manafort on board anyway.

      Reply
      • adamsmith1922

         /  24th February 2019

        Of course Trump knew, just like he knew what Roger Stone was up to. Trump and Stone were both Roy Cohn acolytes

        Reply
  2. Joe Bloggs

     /  24th February 2019

    Mueller’s sentencing memo is a scathing indictment of Paul Manafort (and by implication the Orange Shitgibbon who hired him). But I’m interested in what’s NOT said as much as what IS said.

    At each step of his investigation, Mueller has chosen to submit far more details into the public record than necessary. But this time, the transcript, declaration, and exhibits are significantly redacted (almost entirely, in the case of the breach exhibits).

    Some of the redactions are required by law and DOJ regulations, such as the grand jury transcripts, which are protected by grand jury secrecy rules. DOJ regs also protect the names of unindicted people and the description of the other DOJ investigation Manafort lied about is still protected as an ongoing investigation.

    But the rest of the materials are redacted for another reason: which can only be to protect the investigation.

    Mueller hasn’t revealed all the evidence of Manafort’s ongoing communications with the trump administration. He has completely redacted the issue of sharing polling data. And the details of the August 2 meeting are also hidden.

    So Mueller is using a different strategy here to his typical talking documents.

    It suggests to me that Mueller thinks he can present the details about that August 2 meeting and the communications, and details of the shared polling data somewhere else.

    It also suggests to me that Mueller doesn’t want to reveal what he knows about who and what Manafort’s lies have been protecting.

    I would guess that’s because he’s still pursuing evidence of criminal conduct against that “who”.

    ‘sides which Mueller is still wrangling in court with two witnesses over grand jury subpoenas, including a mystery foreign company that has asked the Supreme Court to take up the case. Richard Gates is still cooperating in several ongoing investigations. And Stone’s trial is also months away, and it’s possible he could decide to cooperate as well.

    There’s still lots of legs on Mueller’s investigation.

    Reply
  3. Bill Brown

     /  24th February 2019

    All going well the jail term won’t be to long as Donald T will issue a pardon ….. much like Bill did for Marc Rich

    Reply
    • If Trump pardons Manafort it will be highly controversial, given his close connections to Trump. And…

      Manafort Is Expected to Face Charges in New York, Even if Trump Pardons Him

      The Manhattan district attorney’s office is preparing state criminal charges against Paul J. Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, in an effort to ensure he will still face prison time even if the president pardons him for his federal crimes, according to several people with knowledge of the matter.

      Mr. Manafort is scheduled to be sentenced next month for convictions in two federal cases brought by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III. He faces up to 25 years in prison for tax and bank fraud and additional time for conspiracy counts in a related case. It could effectively be a life sentence for Mr. Manafort, who turns 70 in April.

      The president has broad power to issue pardons for federal crimes, but no such authority in state cases. And while there has been no clear indication that Mr. Trump intends to pardon Mr. Manafort, the president has spoken repeatedly of his pardon power and defended his former campaign chairman on a number of occasions, calling him a “brave man.”

      The office of the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., first began investigating Mr. Manafort in 2017 in connection with loans he received from two banks. Those loans were also the subject of some of the counts in the federal indictment that led to his conviction last year. But the state prosecutors deferred their inquiry in order not to interfere with Mr. Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

      Reply

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