Ministry’s ”handsome and competitive” pay offer absolutely rejected by primary teachers

Primary teacher pay negotiations that started last year don’t seem to be making good progress, with a big gap remaining between the total value on offer and sought.

The Ministry of Education says the $698m was the total amount available for bargaining, but union demands added up to $2.5 billion.

RNZ:  Primary school teachers fume over latest pay talks

Primary school teachers say government employment negotiations have been conducted in bad faith, with the Ministry of Education not prepared to shift the value of its offer.

The latest round of negotiations by the primary teachers union ended this week with the ministry offering its original package of pay rises, totalling $698 million.

…the ministry said its latest offer was ”handsome and competitive”.

The ministry said the sum could be divided in different ways – the latest offer reduces raises, but adds extra non-contact hours.

It has also offered an alternative package combining smaller pay rises with 10 extra hours time for teachers to do work outside classes each term.

But:

Paul Goulter from the New Zealand Educational Institute, the union for primary school teachers, said that members were unhappy with the negotiations.

“We call that take it or leave it bargaining and that’s absolutely not the way negotiations should be conducted. It’s condescending and our members absolutely reject it,” Mr Goulter said.

“It demonstrates no interest at all in settling the dispute and it completely ignores the fact that we have a staffing crisis in New Zealand’s education system.”

The union will vote in two weeks on whether to accept the offer, or whether to strike the same day as a secondary school teachers strike, on 3 April.

Given the big gap, strikes look likely.

 

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17 Comments

  1. David

     /  10th March 2019

    Good stuff, lets hope there is a shed load of disruption and Ardern feels a fair bit of heat given she likes to visit schools when campaigning and then she might want to ditch her national awards legislation.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  10th March 2019

      public have little sympathy for teachers…and even less…when they strike.

      Reply
      • duperez

         /  10th March 2019

        Some of the public have their reasons for the lack of sympathy for teachers. The obvious ones are that teachers have so much of the year off, work short hours, have no accountability, the job in itself is pretty easy and they are well paid for what they do.

        Some of the less obvious factors include the activity being essentially a socialist activity and parents having to hand authority over their kids to someone else, some no-hoper who doesn’t know anything and is only a teacher because they’re not capable of anything else.

        Long may there be a shortage of teachers, long may they not be highly paid, long may the most intelligent, most capable people not take the occupation. Long may the socialist, altruistic motivations of wanting to make a difference for people die out and not lead those afflicted by those inadequacies into the job.

        Disclosure: This sneer is made without the knowledge of the teacher living in our house.🙃

        Reply
      • NOEL

         /  10th March 2019

        How ironic was talking to an in law of a teacher an hour ago. He said he did and analysis of her salary.
        Worked out if she was on an hourly rate it would be $13.40.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  10th March 2019

          ‘Worked out if she was on an hourly rate it would be $13.40.’

          how many hours a week?

          Reply
          • Wayne Mapp

             /  10th March 2019

            Definitely bogus. Typical teacher after five years is on $60k, which is $30 per hour for 40 hours. No teacher works 80 hours per week. That would be nearly 12 hours per day 7 days per week.

            Reply
  2. Corky

     /  10th March 2019

    Here you go, Simon! Simon?

    Time to remind voters if Jonsey hadn’t been handed a bag of lollies this issue would have been settled.

    A promise by National to smash teacher unions would make things better for everyone involved.

    Reply
  3. Gezza

     /  10th March 2019

    When it comes to the teacher shortage I’d be interested to know exactly why there’s a teacher shortage because I doubt its all down to money.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  10th March 2019

      It isn’t all down to the money. As with anything there are a complex range of issues. Why would anyone take it up when those who are loud about it being a sinecure don’t, or won’t and obviously aren’t tell us how proud they are that their Maia or Martin are taking it up.

      The status of teachers is but one factor. While comparatively New Zealand figures quite highly in teachers status internationally I think some of anti-teacher side are loud in their disparagement.

      https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/ECE/2535/5971

      https://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?cid=25920011&item=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.edweek.org%2Fv1%2Fblogs%2F83%2F%3Fuuid%3D35163

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  10th March 2019

        Teachers are seen as minor/junior bureaucrats dealing with children as most are government employees. Being highly regulated they seem to have little autonomy or control over what they do.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  10th March 2019

          You’re right. By and large it’s paint by numbers, numbers handed down the chain. But that’s the way we want it, we can’t trust them to be autonomous and in control of what they do.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  11th March 2019

          Teachers are seen as minor/junior bureaucrats dealing with children as most are government employees.

          God all bloody mighty! What absolutely absurd twaddle. Whatever people might think of teachers – which ranges from airey fairey feminist dinglebunnies to Marxist commissars in drag slowly and deviously wrenching children from the affections of their parents and undermining the entire apparatus of the capitalist state – I don’t know anyone apart from you who would see them as “bureaucrats”.

          Might be time for you to see a professsional, Al?

          Bureaucrat Bogeypersons seem to have finally taken control of your mind, and you haven’t realised it. 😐

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  11th March 2019

            It’s easy to see where you spent your working life, G.

            I’ve seen it from both sides of the divide so know both vuews.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  11th March 2019

              The Bogeypersons make you think that Al.

            • Gezza

               /  11th March 2019

              Don’t give in to the Bogeypersons, Al.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  11th March 2019

              You need to stick a periscope out of your swamp, G.

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