Lara Whyte on female hardline right-wing activists

Investigative journalist Lara Whyte reports on the rise of the new wave of female hardline right-wing activists, a band of reactionary influencers gaining a huge online following.

This concudes with adiscussion of the massacre in Christchurch, New Zealand

The killer used language and symbols pushed by women featured in this programme – and Lara argues this offers a chilling reminder of the dangers that can come out of some of their ideas.

@inThePaePae:

Exceptional work by Lara Whyte. Features recent visitor to NZ, Canada’s Lauren Southern; & UK’s Lucy Brown, with unconvincing squirming about being labelled ‘far right’; ‘nazi’. Whyte puts their PR, rebranding, softening & mainstreaming in context with Christchurch terrorist.

(Whyte describes herself as a reporter, producer and editor from Belfast).

Anti-extremism expert Julia Ebner, who has infiltrated multiple far-right groups, reveals that many of these organisations have begun actively recruiting young women in the hopes of softening their public image and potentially increasing their mainstream appeal.

We hear from Lucy Brown who underwent a political transformation that saw her quit Black Lives Matter and end up working alongside Tommy Robinson, the former head of the English Defence League. Lara also speaks to Canadian YouTube “star” Lauren Southern who was banned from entering the UK in 2018 following a highly offensive protest.

Many of the women Lara speaks to are outspoken critics of Islam and enraged by the grooming gang scandals for which they blame Muslim culture, including a member of 120 Decibels, a campaign group founded in Germany with the aim of combatting what they call “imported sexual violence” towards women committed by illegal immigrants.

Lara explains that most of the young women in this political movement reject the term “far-right”, despite getting routinely labelled as such in the media and by anti-extremist think tanks.

Also Investigating Extremism on Radio 4:

Roger Bolton hears listener views on a documentary investigating the role of women on the far-right, and discusses the BBC’s annual plan.

Radio 4 documentary In The Right caused controversy this week, stirring debate from listeners over whether figures considered to be on the far-right should be given airtime.

Both are worth listening to.

Leave a comment

29 Comments

  1. David

     /  1st April 2019

    The trouble with Lara and many other young women in journalism is they are so far left and closeted any opinion contrary to theirs is labelled extreme.
    It is indoctrinated in left wing universities and newsrooms seem no better than school staff rooms in their group think.

    Reply
  2. Corky

     /  1st April 2019

    ”Many of the women Lara speaks to are outspoken critics of Islam and enraged by the grooming gang scandals for which they blame Muslim culture.”

    Its not a matter of blaming. It’s a matter of fact. It’s also a matter of fact that British authorities have stood by and let this happen. Which culture is to blame is the only point open to debate.

    Reply
    • Maggy Wassilieff

       /  1st April 2019

      I think you will find that most of the grooming Gang scandals occurred under Labour-led Councils.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  1st April 2019

        heres a teen groomed for prostitution . here in NZ .No muslims involved
        https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/111694361/young-auckland-solo-mum-who-prostituted-out-a-teen-has-jail-term-appeal-dismissed
        ‘Two weeks later, on April 4, Kelly and the man negotiated for the victim to go to Auckland’s City Life Hotel for group sex.’

        Again having a labour Mp was irrelevant , large cities are like that.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  1st April 2019

          An irrelevant post. Study the British grooming scandal to get an idea of how systemic this problem was.

          One person in New Zealand? Not a Muslim? Please!

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotherham_child_sexual_exploitation_scandal

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  1st April 2019

            Im just showing it can happen anywhere, and does. You are just focusing on things that confirm your Islamophobia. Go back to the 50s in London
            Christine Keeler
            “She was sexually abused as a teenager both by her mother’s lover and his friends, for whom she babysat.”
            Other countries in Europe say their problem is based around Albanian gangs or [insert minority group here].
            Historically they arent new , but you have blinkered view of the world
            theconversation.com/blamed-for-being-abused-an-uncomfortable-history-of-child-sexual-exploitation-82410

            No different in Israel either
            https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-half-of-israeli-children-suffer-abuse-1.5289516

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  1st April 2019

              ”I’m just showing it can happen anywhere, and does. You are just focusing on things that confirm your Islamophobia”

              It’s a waste of time continuing a debate with you because you obviously
              don’t realise this case is way different to the cases you describe both in numbers, official responses, corruption and a host of other things.

              I noticed some of the cases from Rotherham are still before the court, years later.

              You sound like an apologist. The type that let the Rotherham debacle feaster while the innocent were harmed.

              The Israel study isn’t worth the time looking at for a number of reasons. Some kind soul may like to point out to you why that is.

              Chau.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st April 2019

              Duker, trying to make an Islamophobe (or any other bigot) see sense is waste of time. They don’t want to know that the worst are not representative of the vast majority who are not like that.

              It’s a pity that Corky has begun this again, but it was inevitable, I suppose. I hoped that the massacre would have some effect.

        • Trevors_Elbow

           /  1st April 2019

          Squirrel…. how many have you got?

          Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  1st April 2019

    So did this “investigation” actually discover anything?

    Reply
    • David

       /  1st April 2019

      It discovered that labeling someone who has a different opinion than yours is more lucrative than listening to see if they have a valid arguament.
      If they do then you pick out one stupid they may have said in the past to confirm your biases.
      Never admit they have a point or you will lose all your Twitter friends.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  1st April 2019

        I had a feeling it probably discovered it knew everythkev worth knowing before it started.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  1st April 2019

          How on earth did everything become that? The miracles of android autocorrect.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  1st April 2019

            Hard to know. I wouldn’t completely rule out divine intervention although there are bound to be other explanations as well.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  1st April 2019

              Probably was aiming at Trump but got the epoch wrong.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  1st April 2019

              That comment sure misidentified its target. Best bin it.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  1st April 2019

            I had pukeko queried on OneDrive; suggestions included pukka and pummelo.

            Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  1st April 2019

    I’ve only had a listen to Lara so far, & apart from the fact I don’t like Lauren Southern who I think has chosen provocation & misrepresentation of Islam to establish & profit off her profile with a carefully targeted segment of the population (mostly anti-muslim & racist males) Heard nothing from Lucy(?) that suggested her beliefs and attitude were wrong or unsoundly based or unreasonable. Except her failure to explain that she may simply have liked the design of the black sun. She didn’t appear to me to have the most intellectual or extensive vocabulary.

    I am suspicious of the Identitarian parties because they do attract people with extremist & racist & intolerant views. But so do religions & political philosophies.

    I’ll have a listen to Bolton now & see what I think.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  1st April 2019

      Ok, I found that an inoffensive, reasonable but not particularly enlightening or convincing as to why people with views that are unpopular but who are not advocating violence or harm toward others should be labelled far right or neo Nazis, terms that are very loosely defined and thrown about.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  1st April 2019

        You didnt like Alt-Right either . I understand the Nazis didnt like that term for them after first being ambivalent, but always preferred Nationalsozialisten. Should they really have been called facist , the non german term for european authoritarianism or broadly ‘militant popularism’
        Strangely we dont refer to Stalins Soviet Union as ‘Commie’ but some on the far right here have used the term for Ardern

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  1st April 2019

          I can’t recall ever expressing a view that I didn’t like the term on Alt Right, Duker, but if a google search with yournz, and other keywords, or a bookmark can help you locate it I’d be happy to view it & see if you’re correct.

          As to these other labels, to me, communists are commies – it’s simply a shortening of the name of those who professed to follow communist ideology and/or their own version or derivation from it, & Nazis are those who voluntarily subscribed to Nazism & Hitler as the embodiment of the Fuhrerprincip.

          Mussolini was a Fascist, his follower had the fasces as one of their iconic symbols.

          Franco is described as a fascist & but the finer points and as to whether he was, or what exactly it is now held to be I am not much concerned about. They were all authoritarian dictatorships, two of them cooperated & jointly in wars of conquest & belief in their right to do so & shared common characteristics but also had differences.

          I don’t consider Ardern a communist. I think she’s a pragmatist & genuinely believes that her view that being nice, as she sees it, means not saying things that some people may find offensive, & and that being nice can somehow be translated into a working system of government, but really hasn’t any idea whether it can, or what must be done to do it. That, I think, is the essence of her philosophy.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  1st April 2019

            Mussolini (1922) wasnt the first dictator in Europe and his party was called Partito Nazionale Fascista -( interestingly ‘nazionale’). But Italian groups known as Fasci ( from 1870) preceded him.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  1st April 2019

              I find myself thinking from time to time what a shame it is that the defects inherent in the evolution of the human ape’s brain continually lead so many to so much continual mayhem and misery.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st April 2019

              I think that ‘Commie’ has been around for a very long time and was probably used in Stalin’s day. I wouldn’t say it of that era because everyone knows that Russia was communist then and there’d be no point in saying it. It’s usually used of people, isn’t it ?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st April 2019

              Commie was around in the 40s, and it is used of people. So nobody would call the regime ‘commie’.

            • Duker

               /  1st April 2019

              “An October headline in The Australian proclaimed: “Kiwis now led by a commie as Ardern attacks capitalism and embraces socialist roots.”

              “She said this morning it doesn’t mean anything, it’s just – I’m sorry, it does. Comrades means something. It is actually a Marxist term. And you don’t pick that sort of thing up because you’re not a Marxist.”- Leighton Smith

              Another day , same old bubble of ignorance

            • Gezza

               /  1st April 2019

              Comrades is also a military term. And I wouldn’t be surprised if its usage in that context precedes its adoption in other situations. Is he also arguing she’s therefore a soldier?

          • Duker

             /  1st April 2019

            Nonsense. It was used in French revolution in a political context, all titles being abolished.
            In English, the first known use of the word “comrade” with this meaning was in 1884 in the socialist magazine Justice. Wiki

            In Arderns case it would have come from her time in London in labour party circles where usage was still strong.
            L Smith is of course the doyen of the hard right in NZ….. And was playing with words but meant commie.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  1st April 2019

              Less than half the story really. Also wiki

              Upon abolishing the titles of nobility in France, and the terms monsieur and madame (literally, “my lord” and “my lady”), the revolutionaries employed the term citoyen for men and citoyenne for women (both meaning “citizen”) to refer to each other.[3] The deposed King Louis XVI, for instance, was referred to as Citoyen Louis Capet to emphasize his loss of privilege.[4]

              When the socialist movement gained momentum in the mid-18th century, socialists elsewhere began to look for a similar egalitarian alternative to terms like “Mister”, “Miss”, or “Missus”. In German, the word Kamerad had long been used as an affectionate form of address among people linked by some strong common interest, such as a sport, a college, a profession (notably as a soldier), or simply friendship.[5] The term was often used with political overtones in the revolutions of 1848, and was subsequently borrowed by French and English. In English, the first known use of the word “comrade” with this meaning was in 1884 in the socialist magazine Justice.[6]

              But, I can’t be bothered quibbling over what I regard as a trifling matter. Comrades in arms is in common usage today & has been for some decades at least. And I’m certain I’ve heard it frequently used to describe various forms of male groups who share various interests or views beyond Communism.

              You carry on about it some more if you want to though. I’ve lost what little interest I actually had for a brief moment.

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