Seymour grandstanding while Parliament sat and acted without him

David Seymour was busy talking the democratic high ground over the pending rush job on the Arms Amendment Bill, the Government (with the support of the National Opposition) outmanoeuvred him in the House.

NZ Herald: ACT Leader David Seymour misses chance to force Govt to use urgency for gun law’s first reading

Act leader David Seymour was so busy objecting to media about the speed of the Government’s gun law reform that he missed being in the House to block the process being streamlined.

The Government was planning on seeking leave to streamline the bill’s passage through Parliament, including having the first reading this afternoon.

Seymour had planned to block any such attempt, which would have forced the Government to use urgency, but Seymour was not in the House when a motion for an expedited process was moved.

He was outside the House at the time, telling media that the Government was too concerned with “being seen to do the right thing on the global stage”.

TUESDAY, 2 APRIL 2019

The Speaker took the Chair at 2 p.m.

Prayers.

ARMS (PROHIBITED FIREARMS, MAGAZINES, AND PARTS) AMENDMENT BILL

Procedure

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS (Leader of the House): I seek leave for the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill to be set down for first reading after general business today, despite Standing Order 285(1)(b); for there to be no debate on the instruction to the select committee to consider the bill despite Standing Order 290; for the bill to be available for second reading on Tuesday, 9 April, despite Standing Order 296; should the member in charge desire, for the bill to be set down for the committee of the whole House forthwith, following the second reading, despite Standing Order 299; and for the bill to be set down for third reading forthwith, following the committee stage, despite Standing Order 310.

SPEAKER: Is there any objection to that process being followed? There appears to be none.

Chuckling could be heard from Members, most of whom had made it into the House on time.

Claire Trevett: Act’s David Seymour hoist on tardy petard

Seymour had been strutting around proud as a peacock for being the only self-proclaimed true champion of democracy by refusing to give his leave for firearms legislation to be passed in a hurry.

He stood alone on his high horse. In the wake of the Christchurch mosque attacks, all other parties had agreed to support hasty progression for at least the first tranche of changes – the banning of some guns, and tougher new penalties.

Seymour was so busy talking to the media about his plans to refuse leave for the reforms to be rushed that by the time he made it to his seat to carry out this superhuman feat it was already done.

Instead of delivering democracy he was outfoxed by Leader of the House Chris Hipkins.

Rather than wait until after Question Time as usual, Hipkins stood just before Question Time began to ask for the leave of Parliament to expedite the bill. Seymour was still outside, oblivious.

Members of Parliament did not quite manage to stay as deadpan as the Speaker. Audible laughter swept through Parliament. The Greens – usually most opposed to the hasty progression of legislation – were first to gloat on Twitter.

National MPs Maggie Barry, Paul Goldsmith and Paula Bennett could all be seen looking at Seymour’s desk and laughing. He wandered in a few minutes later.

Undaunted, Seymour sought to re-cast himself as the Superman of Democracy. Rather than berate himself for bad timekeeping, he claimed the fact Hipkins had taken advantage of his tardiness in such a fashion showed what little regard Hipkins had for democracy.

To succeed at democracy you have to be on top of democratic processes. Seymour should have saved hos crowing until after his democratic egg was laid, but he ended up with yolk on his face.

Whether it was good democracy or not, the quick thinking and speed reading of Hipkins meant that the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill is rushing through Parliament than Urgency would have allowed.

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18 Comments

  1. lurcher1948

     /  3rd April 2019

    It’s a joy to behold when National is laughing at him…ACT might only last 17 months now.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  3rd April 2019

      You surely don’t think Epsom will turn its back on Seymour do you?

      Reply
  2. Corky

     /  3rd April 2019

    Interesting that the media concentrates on Seymour being too late to object. And, no doubt, there is a funny side to this. A sitting parliament loves a laugh at a members expense.

    But the media should have related that if Seymour had been in the house, proceedings would have been held up for maybe ten minutes before the government moved on.

    The politically ignorant may not realise Seymour’s stand was symbolic and had no political clout given the numbers.

    ”The Greens – usually most opposed to the hasty progression of legislation – were first to gloat on Twitter.”

    No surprises here..except hypocrisy.

    ”National MPs Maggie Barry, Paul Goldsmith and Paula Bennett could all be seen looking at Seymour’s desk and laughing. He wandered in a few minutes later.”

    No surprises here… National, the political equivalent of the Masons – all pomp and ceremony..but they seem to have forgotten their original purpose. In fact they wouldn’t have a clue.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  3rd April 2019

      Poor Corky , explaining why even a symbolic move just showed Seymour couldnt even showboat properly. Thats the whole idea,- not the extra time taken to get around him- but to show on the TV news , The Speaker asking ‘Any objection’ and a little twerp Seymour gets up to say ‘ Object’.
      Barrie of course has had issues over his End of Life Bill, and loves seeing Seymour shown as an amateur

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd April 2019

        It would have been more than a symbolic move; this was forcing the government into ‘urgency’, and was more than just ‘objection’.

        Claire Trevett’s mixed cliches; proud as a peacock alone on his high horse show a paucity of imagination.

        Reply
  3. Zedd

     /  3rd April 2019

    I think David is just trying, a bit too hard.. to be seen ‘as relevant’ or NOT ?

    Frankly I prefer listening his debating skills, over the majority of Natl MPs !

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  3rd April 2019

      His skills have led to ACT vote dropping even lower. Only swivel eyed loons can see Seymour as charismatic and gifted orator, when the opposite is true. Stilted, inauthentic.
      Its only because parliaments rules have changed from 20 yrs ago to allow MPs to read speeches that he even exists at all ( along with many others). A point of order would have shut them all up after 20 secs ‘in the good old days’

      Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  3rd April 2019

    Saw that. 1news at 6 showed him outside the Chamber, talking to reporters about it. Talk about laugh.

    Reply
  5. duperez

     /  3rd April 2019

    Seymour is in a continual controlled attention and relevance mode. This one ended up with him, in a sense, coming in a completely different door than the one he intended.

    No matter, twerk or jerk he’s in the news, and that’s what he was after in the gun thing. That’s all that matters.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  3rd April 2019

      Theres is such a thing as the wrong sort of publicity. And he makes it worse by excusing his failure to be in his seat to say ‘Object’ by highlighting his irrelevance -‘they would have got around my objection’
      Hello this guy is a double fool all at the same time . Politics is a large part of the optics and being in the right place at the right time-

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd April 2019

        He’s no fool. I have known him for some years, and anyone who writes him off as a fool is one themselves.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  3rd April 2019

          The voters think he is a fool ..how much has ACTS vote fallen is proof.

          F O O L

          Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  3rd April 2019

    Can’t be in two places at once when you are a one man band. He should have got a supporter to watch the House while he did his media stuff and then he would have been alerted to their tricks to bypass him.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  3rd April 2019

      I wonder if the reporter delayed him on purpose, making it difficult for him to break in and leave.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  3rd April 2019

        The House started its sitting time at 2PM… I understand they have sounds/bells? to let members know what time it is or sitting is about to begin.
        Reporters delayed him ? You mean he was loving the spotlight, Hipkins was just faster

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  3rd April 2019

          The one news angle was on the action in the Chamber. David not being there was an amusing aside in the item. While he was shown speaking to reporters, in typical 1news political reporter fashion the video clip of him was over in a flash & whatever his exact issues were weren’t really heard or covered.

          Reply
  7. Blazer

     /  3rd April 2019

    food for thought from Ianmac @TS..

    ‘It did cross my mind that Seymour can make much of needing to say “Yes” while “accidentally missing the vote. Is he clever enough to have his cake and eating it too?’

    Reply
  1. Seymour grandstanding while Parliament sat and acted without him — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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