‘Tax Justice Aotearoa’ pushing for Capital Gains Tax

A group linked to an international tax reform movement, but seemingly light on tax expertise, is launching a campaign to push for a Capital Gains Tax, plus tax cuts for low income earners and increases for high earners.

It seems to be late in the tax reform process, with Cabinet due to announce what it plans to do following with the Tax Working Group recommendations this month.

NZ Herald: Tax Justice Aotearoa launches campaign pushing for capital gains tax

A nationwide campaign pushing for a capital gains tax is being launched today by Tax Justice Aotearoa NZ.

The campaign, which is officially launched at Parliament at 10am, is backed by advertising in major newspapers across the country, and on billboards and in bus shelters in Wellington.

“The campaign will add balance to the current tax debate and give voice to the many people and organisations who believe it’s time for a capital gains tax to help reduce inequality in Aotearoa,” the group said in a statement.

I’m not sure that this group is big on balance.

As well as a capital gains tax, the campaign calls for tax cuts for low to middle income-earners and hikes for the highest paid.

It also suggests reducing GST, pressuring multinationals to pay more tax in New Zealand and taking stronger tax action against polluters.

An advertisement in today’s New Zealand Herald from the group said tax reform was good for the public good.

“Tax Justice Aotearoa welcomes tax reform. It’s well known we have a stubborn gap between rich and poor and we don’t have enough money to sustain and grow decent public services.”

Campaign supporters include the Public Health Association, New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services, Council of Trade Unions, Public Service Association, Hui E! Community Aotearoa, Equality Network, Closing the Gap, Poverty Action Waikato, and UCAN (United Community Action Network).

That looks like the social side of the tax and economic equation.

Website: About Tax Justice Aotearoa

Tax Justice Aotearoa NZ seeks a fairer society through tax reform. We represent the growing number of people who wish to see greater transparency, equality and fairness in national and global tax systems. Founded in August 2018 and linked with the global Tax Justice Network, we provide analysis, ideas and information to create an informed dialogue about how tax builds societies where all people flourish.

Read our charter here.

The steering committee:

Louise Delany

Louise is a public health lawyer and academic. For most of her working life Louise has been employed as a public servant in the health sector on public health law and policy; she has also worked as a legal researcher at the Law Commission; as a drafter; and adviser in the Ministry of Justice. Currently Louise works part-time as a senior lecturer, teaching public health law and ethics; and global health law.

Paul Barber

Paul is a Policy Adviser with the NZ Council of Christian Social Services. He coordinates the NZCCSS policy and advocacy work that responds to poverty, housing, inequality and exclusion and is a member of the steering group for the Equality Network.

Jo Spratt

Jo has a doctorate in policy studies, is a registered nurse, and has worked in international development for over fifteen years, predominantly in Melanesia. Jo brings a global perspective to the work of TJANZ.

Mike Smith

Mike is a retired community, union and political organiser, most recently as General Secretary of the Labour Party. He is currently Treasurer of the NZ Fabian Society.

Gervais Lawrie

Originally from the Brighton in the UK, Gervais recently became a resident in his adoptive home of Wellington. Interests include words, evidence and being outside.

These are probably capable and well intentioned people.

But for finding a fair and equitable balance to our tax system I think that economic, tax and employment expertise would be useful if not essential.

Their timing isn’t great either, with the Tax Working Group public engagement happening last year.

Perhaps Tax Justice Aotearoa is concerned that the TWG and the Government aren’t going to go far enough with tax reform.

 

Leave a comment

23 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  8th April 2019

    Mike Smith should focus on giving One Tree Hill back its tree.

    Most seem fully paid up members of the Loony Left.

    Reply
  2. Blazer

     /  8th April 2019

    a bit of balance to counter the woeful bias of the ‘Taxpayers Union.

    Reply
  3. lurcher1948

     /  8th April 2019

    Don’t worry folks Simon Bridges is on to it, NO NEW TAXES and no old taxes, in fact Simon will close NZ down so the”RICH PRICKS” …National party donors DONT NEED TO PAY THEIR FAIR SHARE, folks this is how the NZ rich stay rich, they have Simon Bridges as their mouthpiece…just saying for a friend

    Reply
    • David

       /  8th April 2019

      Unlike the poor and unemployed that support your team and are a net cost to the country

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  8th April 2019

        we can’t afford the rich…anymore..David.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  8th April 2019

          If we don’t have the ‘rich’, we can’t afford most things paid for by their taxes, which are a disproportionately large amount of tax revenue. The envious never seem to work this one out.

          Reply
        • David

           /  8th April 2019

          Would you like my tax bill for the last year ? I just about covered the cost of Twyford which would be hard to say was exceptional value for money.

          Reply
    • Corky

       /  8th April 2019

      Don’t hold back, Lurchy. Let your hate out. It’ll be cathartic.🤔

      Talking of rich pricks..how is Sir Michael doing? Is it true he now wants a bag of donuts a day as an allowance?

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  8th April 2019

        I can well believe it, David. People who want to soak those on high incomes ignore the fact that a small % pay most of the tax take. Politics of envy, ignoring the fact that most people on high incomes EARN them.

        Reply
  4. Sunny

     /  8th April 2019

    Jo Spratt appears to be the advocacy and campaigns director for Oxfam – i wonder why that isn’t on her tax justice nz boio. Jo Spratt and oxfam have been running a tax campaign – “Meet your mp and demand a fair tax now. ” I wonder how much Tax Oxfam itself pays! Does Oxfam think that charities should pay a fair tax. None of the people in the group appear to have a tax background. They all work for unions, governemnt or ngo’s. None of them have their own family home on the line if they make a business loss or stayed awake wondering how to pay the bills for a family business that employs people. In an NGO what happens if you make a loss. Nothing. Life goes on.

    Reply
  5. alloytoo

     /  8th April 2019

    A fair tax would be everyone paying the same…..not just the middle class and the wealthy paying exponentially more as they work harder.

    I don’t think that’s what they really want.

    Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  8th April 2019

    one thing is clear from the CGT debate; is it really about making ‘Mum/Dad investors’ pay more OR is really about making the FATCATS pay ‘there fair share’ most pay PAYE on every dollar earned, why not all folks who make ongoing profits, from the ‘buying & selling’ game too ?? :/ 😦 😦

    Reply
    • David

       /  8th April 2019

      Its Mum and Dad investors who get caught, the professional investor who flips houses is caught already either because its a taxable activity or through the brightline test. The CGT is just a complication and they raise little revenue.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  8th April 2019

      I was sorely tempted to give you a downtick for that utter nonsense, Zedd.

      Reply
  7. “About 10 people were present for the launch of the campaign by Tax Justice Aotearoa NZ at Parliament this morning.”
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12220298

    Reply
    • Trevors_Elbow

       /  8th April 2019

      TEN!!!!! Wow….. in Wellington and that was it??? We have a cadre of almost career protesters so TEN is just pathetic….. Obviously the get out the protest money wasn’t very good and it was a nice day today, so weather cant be an excuse….

      Reply
  1. ‘Tax Justice Aotearoa’ pushing for Capital Gains Tax — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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