Arms Amendment Bill passes third reading

The Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines and Parts) Amendment Bill  passed it’s third and final reading tonight in Parliament, with all MPs apart from David Seymour voting in favour.

Jacinda Ardern’s third reading speech began:

Rt Hon JACINDA ARDERN (Prime Minister) on behalf of the Minister of Police: I move, That the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill be now read a third time.

We are here just 26 days after the most devastating of terrorist attacks created the darkest of days in New Zealand’s history and we are here as an almost entirely united Parliament. There have been very few occasions, in my history, when I have seen Parliament come together in this way and I cannot imagine circumstances where that is more necessary than it is now.

I want to acknowledge therefore, as I begin my contribution here in this third reading debate, those parliamentarians who have worked so constructively in this discussion and debate. Of course, that goes for our coalition and confidence and supply partners as members of this Government—I acknowledge you—but I also pay particular tribute to the Opposition, who, from the moment this issue around the use of these particular weapons in this terror attack arose, I have found to be nothing but constructive. I acknowledge you sincerely for that.

Chris Bishop responded:

CHRIS BISHOP (National—Hutt South): Thank you very much, Mr Speaker. I rise on behalf of the National Party to lend our support to the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill, and, in the start of my contribution, I want to, on behalf of the party, acknowledge the Prime Minister for her remarks in opening this third reading debate, and also acknowledge her leadership in the hours and days and weeks following the shooting. I have received many comments in the last few weeks around your leadership, Prime Minister, and I think all of New Zealand has been impressed by your steadfastness at a time of great trial for our country.

I also want to acknowledge the Minister Stuart Nash, who’s worked quite collaboratively with those of us in the Opposition on this regime that we’re about to pass into law, and I want to acknowledge Michael Wood, who chaired the committee, I think, in a very good fashion—a quick fashion, but a very good fashion.

Hansard transcript.

The Governor general will give it final approval tomorrow (Thursday).

RNZ:  Firearms Amendment Bill passes final reading in Parliament

The law change had near uanimous support, with ACT the only party to oppose it. The bill now only needs to be signed off by the Governor General before becoming law.

The move follows the announcement today of the finer details of the government’s proposed buyback scheme for firearms.

Independent advisors will come up with a price list for the buyback scheme and a separate expert panel will be set up to determine fair compensation for high-value firearms.

The government is also planning another phase of firearms reform, exploring possible restrictions and changes to the vetting process, a firearms register and more.

The prime minister said yesterday this second tranche would likely be this year, before a the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the attack – and whether more could have been done to prevent it – reports back.

Also announced by the Government today:  Legal framework for gun buyback scheme announced

Police Minister Stuart Nash has announced a legal framework for the gun buyback will be established as a first step towards determining the level of compensation. It will include compensation for high capacity magazines and parts.

Mr Nash has outlined changes to the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines and Parts) Amendment Bill which will be debated during the committee stages of the legislation.

The Supplementary Order Paper reflects changes arising from the Select Committee process. It sets out the framework for dealing with the legal ownership of weapons, magazines and parts and the broad approach for determining payments.

“The regulations will create a framework to set compensation based on make, model and condition of the items. They will provide for rights of review and appeal,” Mr Nash says.

“Independent advisors will develop the price list for approval by Cabinet. A separate expert panel of advisors will be established to determine fair compensation for high value firearms.

“Police have also consulted extensively with Australian officials to familiarise themselves with the pitfalls and legal risks encountered there. Australia has had almost thirty amnesties and buyback schemes since the 1990s.

“The new measures make it clear that surrendered firearms will be the property of the Crown. Owners will be compensated for them, if the guns were lawfully obtained and the person had the appropriate firearms licence. Price lists will be set out in regulations which are now being drafted.

“This framework provides certainty for all participants in this process and sets out a clear appeal process if the compensation is disputed.

“A number of transitional measures are also being put in place to handle one-off questions.  This includes weapons which were in transit from overseas when the ban took effect. Customs officials may deliver them to Police as part of the amnesty and buyback arrangement.

“Police are already collecting bank account details from people who are taking part in the gun amnesty. They are well placed to begin paying compensation once the scheme is confirmed. I can reassure firearms owners there will be plenty of time for them to hand over their weapons as part of the amnesty and to have their compensation processed under the buyback as well.

“The government has listened closely to official advice about the need to provide statutory authority for decisions and payments under the buyback scheme,” Mr Nash said.

The regulations are expected to be considered by Cabinet in May. If necessary, the amnesty can be extended by a month or so to run alongside the buyback.

The SoP is published here: http://legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2019/0125/latest/versions.aspx

Leave a comment

12 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  10th April 2019

    Wonder if for the ‘second phase’ if Seymour will continue to sit on fence where is for the legislation in principle but opposed to a fast track. The second phase won’t be fast tracked but by then Seymour may have been bought by the firearms lobby lock stock and barrel….going from dancing with the Stars to hunting with the hounds

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  11th April 2019

      What a disgusting slander. He has said that his only objection is to the haste and that he is only opposed to that.

      Your suggestion that he is for sale and could be bought by the gun lobby is grossly offensive. You seem to think that we are in the US where the NRA openly does these things. This will not happen here. There is no equivalent of the NRA as far as I know, and the bill has been passed.

      How dare you make such vile suggestions with nothing at all to back them up ?

      Reply
  2. Add to the post:

    CHRIS BISHOP (National—Hutt South): Thank you very much, Mr Speaker. I rise on behalf of the National Party to lend our support to the Arms (Prohibited Firearms, Magazines, and Parts) Amendment Bill, and, in the start of my contribution, I want to, on behalf of the party, acknowledge the Prime Minister for her remarks in opening this third reading debate, and also acknowledge her leadership in the hours and days and weeks following the shooting.

    I have received many comments in the last few weeks around your leadership, Prime Minister, and I think all of New Zealand has been impressed by your steadfastness at a time of great trial for our country.

    I also want to acknowledge the Minister Stuart Nash, who’s worked quite collaboratively with those of us in the Opposition on this regime that we’re about to pass into law, and I want to acknowledge Michael Wood, who chaired the committee, I think, in a very good fashion—a quick fashion, but a very good fashion.

    Reply
  3. Reply
    • Corky

       /  10th April 2019

      Tautoko. I seriously hope National is punished for their acquiescence. A National Party in name only. Wastes of space.

      As for Labour. Well that’s a simple equation. Jacinda’s sainthood >/< then the people they have pissed off. Labour may not yet realise the consequences of their actions. That's for them to find out.

      Democracy? Hell no!

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  11th April 2019

        Threats huh..doesnt surprise me at all.
        The buyback of these weapons will make us all safer

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  11th April 2019

          ”Threats huh..doesn’t surprise me at all.”

          What threats.? Don’t run away on me, now.

          There will be a thriving black market for weapons. There already is. The difference now is it’ll be like shopping at the supermarket. A whole department of semis to choose from.

          Meanwhile, all honest decent people will dutifully hand in their weapons in the mistaken belief it’s for the betterment of society. I doubt many will get full recompense for their weapons.

          ”The buyback of these weapons will make us all safer.”

          Bullshit.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  11th April 2019

            You just don’t seem to understand why weapons designed for military use (killing people) have no place in NZ.

            They may make the puny feel powerful, but that’s their problem when they have to find something else to make them feel like real men.

            Good luck with having a semis department to choose from. Where will this be ? On Trade Me ? Amazon ? Garage sales ?

            Reply
            • patupaiarehe

               /  11th April 2019

              What you don’t seem to understand Kitty, is that if you outlaw guns, only outlaws will have them.

  4. Patzcuaro

     /  11th April 2019

    Next cab off the rank?

    Reply
  1. David Seymour on Arms Amendment Bill – third reading speech | Your NZ
  2. Mark Patterson (NZ First MP) supporting the Arms Amendment Bill | Your NZ

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