Open Forum – Thursday

11 April 2019

This post is open to anyone to comment on any topic that isn’t spam, illegal or offensive. All Your NZ posts are open but this one is for you to raise topics that interest you, or you think may interest others.. 

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29 Comments

  1. lurcher1948

     /  11th April 2019

    The Auckland Shooting Club opened by Paula Bennet,not very good neighbours,what were they thinking,an interesting read,
    https://t.co/VpfZt6geo0

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  11th April 2019

      Oh, dear. According to ZB, Stuart Nash told a competitive shooter to maybe store their guns with the police until the law is sorted or exemptions made.

      Lol..what a fucking banana republic. Still, it seems to impress some on this blog.

      Reply
  2. Mother

     /  11th April 2019

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/04/winston-peters-defends-sir-anand-satyanand-over-sex-abuse-inquiry-criticism.html

    Mr Satyanand is correct to stand down. It appears that he didn’t realise it was inappropriate for a Catholic to be involved in these enquiries. This has caused undue stress for the victims. What a shame they were put in the position of having to point out something which should have been obvious from the beginning.

    In many situations now we are asked/coerced by tyrants to adopt a method of trusting minority groups whom believe they are trustworthy – and the largest most important group, made up of individuals, are expected to throw both caution and science to the wind. This is a concern worthy of a push back from many individuals.

    Reply
  3. lurcher1948

     /  11th April 2019

    The rightwing ranters fleeing Kiwiblog have found a new blog to vent on, Labour knows about it,
    https://ysb.co.nz/

    Reply
  4. lurcher1948

     /  11th April 2019

    Now this has to hurt…..the pain
    https://t.co/FIla3f9gOp

    Reply
  5. patupaiarehe

     /  11th April 2019

    Parliament have rushed through legislation recently, due to the actions of one individual, which is allegedly in the best interests of all NZer’s.This legislation will inconvenience many, but is in the best interests of the safety of the majority, right? Our so called ‘leaders’ have admitted that a buyback scheme, which is fair to the owners of MSSA’s, will cost hundreds of millions of dollars, but is allegedly necessary.
    An associate of mine was recently convicted of being DIC of a motor vehicle, as well as dangerous driving, due to crashing his car while drunk. As a consequence, he was ordered to have an interlock installed in his vehicle to prevent him from reoffending, and risking the safety of others.
    In the interests of public safety, I have a proposal, which IMHO needs to be rushed through parliament. I propose that every vehicle sold in this country from this day forth, have an alcohol interlock installed. Whilst it may be inconvenient for everyone to have to blow into a breath tester to start their vehicle, then wait for it to unlock the ignition, they can sit happy in the knowledge that being subjected to this somehow makes the roads safer for everyone.

    Reply
    • Mother

       /  11th April 2019

      Did your friend deliberately train for many years about how to be a drunkard, applying historical lessons and swapping advice online? Then did he go out with a plan to kill others in his drunkenness?

      I take your point though. You don’t like the nanny state either.

      He could be grateful that someone in authority is minimising his chances of killing innocents.

      Reply
      • patupaiarehe

         /  11th April 2019

        Did your friend deliberately train for many years about how to be a drunkard, applying historical lessons and swapping advice online? Then did he go out with a plan to kill others in his drunkenness?

        I don’t think most would consider it ‘training’ Mother, but yes, my friend & I conspired online regularly to get intoxicated. I live within walking distance of our local, & he doesn’t.
        My point is that anyone who owns a motor vehicle is capable of harming others with it. Cars don’t kill people, and guns don’t kill people.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  11th April 2019

          The flaw in your argument is that people don’t die in car accidents where there was no car involved.

          Reply
          • patupaiarehe

             /  11th April 2019

            People don’t get shot where no gun is involved. Your point being?

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  11th April 2019

              Cars and guns DO kill people.
              Two things are required for a hate-filled or psychotic mass murderer to carry out a mass shooting.
              1. That kind of person.
              2. Access to firearms that enable it or make it easy.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  11th April 2019

              1. Agreed, that kind of person
              2. A means of inflicting harm. Which isn’t necessarily a firearm. I’m relying on memory here (since the chief censor says nobody is allowed to view the ‘manifesto’) but far greater harm could be inflicted with a van full of household flour, a method of dispersal, and an ignition source.
              Those who have nefarious intent will find the means to inflict it upon others.

            • Gezza

               /  11th April 2019

              Yes, but a murder-bent mass shooter now has a less easy access to the tools for that specific way. And guns are DESIGNED to kill from a safe distance.

              Much harder to make ammonium nitrate & aluminium powder bombs now too, I gather, since Timothy McVeigh wreaked his havoc.

              Tarrant’s survival chances if cornered by police here in NZ were possibly a bit higher than in, say, the US too. His chances of one day getting released before he carks it may be pretty good here too.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  11th April 2019

              I’m not going to debate methods for a murder bent psychopath to inflict harm on others with you here G. What I will say is that if you think ammonium nitrate is difficult to obtain without arousing suspicion, you are unfortunately mistaken. As for getting released before he carks it, that’s entirely possible, given that his original murder charge related to someone who was not deceased.

            • Gezza

               /  11th April 2019

              Been withdrawn. Won’t be a problem. Hasn’t got a snowflake’s chance in hell (metaphorically speaking) of escaping conviction & a reasonablly long stretch behind locked doors. But if behaves, repents, attests to recognising the error of his ways, convinces the prison psychologists & parole board, who knows? We’ve got a bit of a track record here for releasing dangerous animals who kill again who’d have gone into the ground after the first time in some other countries.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  11th April 2019

              According to his own mad rantings, he will imprisoned as a terrorist, but be released in 27 years as a champion of his people, & awarded a nobel peace prize. Just like Nelson Mendela….

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  11th April 2019

      Is he a recidivist or was it a first offence?

      Reply
      • patupaiarehe

         /  11th April 2019

        He’s been done more than once Alan, which is why he has an interlock

        Reply
  6. sorethumb

     /  11th April 2019

    Leighton Smith Podcast Episode 11 – 10 April 2019
    https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/podcasts/the-leighton-smith-podcast/leighton-smith-podcast-episode-11-10-april-2019/

    Steven Franks discusses how a right to forget bill would mean Golriz (who he says faked her CV and refugee status) could have that record wiped. He is scornful of many lawyers (especially “the Andrew Little type”) and the way Labour appoints it’s buddies such as Paul Hunt (a Corubyn fan) to high paying jobs. He slams today’s Phds who just chew out a lot of words.

    Reply
    • phantom snowflake

       /  11th April 2019

      Yes, for sure, Golriz Ghahraman totally faked her refugee status when she arrived in New Zealand aged nine!

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  11th April 2019

      I like it when flash lawyers play little games about other lawyers who aren’t flash. Franks scornful of many lawyers? Some lawyers are easy to scorn, especially the superior ones (in their own minds) and the high and mighty ones who’ve risen to the giddy heights that Franks has reached.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  11th April 2019

        Golriz has her work cut out to convince any reasonably intelligent person she’s not a ditzy airhead with a law degree, in my own opinion.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  11th April 2019

          Simon Bridges has a law degree.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  11th April 2019

            Tbh, the polls so far, & my own observations, suggest he also has his work still cut out to convince any reasonably intelligent person that HE’s not a ditzy airhead with a law degree. :/

            Certainly seems to have a natural talent for making a complete idiot of himself almost immediately after he’s just had any sort of ‘win’.

            Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  11th April 2019

        Why do you like it?

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  11th April 2019

          Because it reinforces the truth of them being ordinary people who have all the foibles and pettiness of everyone. There used to be a common perception that their intellect knowledge and the hard work they’d put in over years to get their qualifications made them exceptional people.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  11th April 2019

            The exceptional ones are exceptional just like everyone else and so are the ordinary ones. I don’t discount them because of their profession or politics. I try to judge them on the merits of their words and actions. On that basis I usually find Franks sensible and Golriz a posturing airhead.

            Reply

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