Easter Friday

What does Easter Friday mean to everyone?

It’s only ever been the first day of a long weekend to me, but it obviously has more significance for some people.

Someone asked on Twitter today “Why do we have Christmas carols, but no songs for Easter…?”

There’s nothing like the amount of singing at Easter as there is at Christmas, especially by non-church-goers, but there are Easter hymns, as pointed out by Adam Smith who has “One of Adam’s favourite pieces of music” on his blog: King’s College Cambridge 2017 Easter Hymn from Cavalleria Rusticana Mascagni

This is more my sort of thing. Most of what I know about the religious side of Easter I have learnt from this:

Whatever you do for your Easter have a good one.

17 Comments

  1. MaureenW

     /  April 19, 2019

    Of all the days of the year to be named ‘good”, they choose the day commemorating the death of the so-called religious saviour. I wonder who decided to name the day Good Friday and why?

    • Kimbo

       /  April 19, 2019

      Options from the etymologists:

      https://slate.com/culture/2017/04/why-is-good-friday-called-good-friday-the-etymology-and-origins-of-the-holidays-name.html

      Seems “good” once included “”holy” in its potential range of meanings. And Good Friday does occur during what is still known as “Holy Week”.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  April 19, 2019

        The Anglo-Saxon ‘god’ (good) didn’t have any connection with God or gods, it’s a ‘false friend’. Holy was halig in OE. God (lower case) is always good in the modern sense except in godsibb (godparent) and so on. I wonder when Good Friday was named that, and if it was meant to be ‘God’s Friday’ or something like that.

        Chaucer doesn’t seem to use good except as a prefix. I could go and look at Piers Plowman…or I could not move the dog and computer and look at PP.

        How nice to be able to stretch a hand out and pick up Chaucer and An Anglo-Saxon Reader. .

      • Gezza

         /  April 19, 2019

        That’s interesting. I’ve always just regarded the passion of Christ as the necessary prelude to the Resurrection, which is seen as the Good News for humanity, establishing Jesus as the human manifestation of God, the divine inspiration of his teachings, & the validation of his miracles. Therefore all 3 days are an essential part of the Good News. I could never understand why they weren’t Good Friday, Good Saturday, Good Sunday. Especially as “Easter” has pagan origins.

        • The word “Easter” is unique to Germanic languages. In the languages of the old Roman Empire, where celebrations predated Germanic Christianity, variations on “Pascha” were used, and still are.

          The word “Easter” actually comes from “rising” or “resurrection” (as does “East”). It does not have pagan origins. Saint Bede speculated about a cult of “Eostre” that had existed several centuries prior, but he is literally the only source of this information, and absent any corroboration, it’s highly probable he may simply have been mistaken about it.

          • Gezza

             /  April 19, 2019

            Also interesting. Wiki summarises thus:

            Etymology
            The modern English term Easter, cognate with modern Dutch ooster and German Ostern, developed from an Old English word that usually appears in the form Ēastrun, -on, or -an; but also as Ēastru, -o; and Ēastre or Ēostre.[nb 3]

            The most widely accepted theory of the origin of the term is that it is derived from the name of an Old English goddess mentioned by the 7th to 8th-century English monk Bede, who wrote that Ēosturmōnaþ (Old English ‘Month of Ēostre’, translated in Bede’s time as “Paschal month”) was an English month, corresponding to April, which he says “was once called after a goddess of theirs named Ēostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated in that month”.[23]

            In Latin and Greek, the Christian celebration was, and still is, called Pascha (Greek: Πάσχα), a word derived from Aramaic פסחא (Paskha), cognate to Hebrew פֶּסַח (Pesach). The word originally denoted the Jewish festival known in English as Passover, commemorating the Jewish Exodus from slavery in Egypt.[24][25] As early as the 50s of the 1st century, Paul, writing from Ephesus to the Christians in Corinth,[26] applied the term to Christ, and it is unlikely that the Ephesian and Corinthian Christians were the first to hear Exodus 12 interpreted as speaking about the death of Jesus, not just about the Jewish Passover ritual.[27] In most of the non-English speaking world, the feast is known by names derived from Greek and Latin Pascha.[3][28] Pascha is also a name by which Jesus himself is remembered in the Orthodox Church, especially in connection with his resurrection and with the season of its celebration.[29]
            … …

            It mentions both Pascha & Easter. Do you have a link or source that corroborates Easter as meaning “rising” or “resurrection”. Or is this just a deduction from the fact the first four letters spell the word “East”, where the sun & moon rise?

    • Good Friday is good, because, defying all logic, the God-man defeats death by death. He takes the cross, hitherto a symbol of shame and a curse, and turns it into His glory and a blessing. The cross is the defeat of the demons and their hold on humanity. It is from the cross that Christ descends to Hades to destroy it.

      Instinctively we see death, especially the death of the Saviour, as a bad thing, but that is the paradox – the death is in fact the Way. The cross is the Way. It is how Christ saves and undoes the work of the devil. And that is about as *good* as it gets.

      • Gezza

         /  April 19, 2019

        Yup. For me that fits with what I said above.

    • Blazer

       /  April 19, 2019

      careful Maude..Mother may pop back rto inform you!

  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  April 19, 2019

    Thanks to NZTA’s monumental Warkworth f*ckup, this is many Aucklander’s Easter Friday:

    • Fight4NZ

       /  April 19, 2019

      I could be wrong but Warkworth had a bypass built decades ago by NZTA. Then some group thought lets build a load of houses up to the edge of the new SH1 and make a load of money, turning it into a suburban road. Would that have been a bunch of self interested, anti-RMA, short sighted developers? Or will they come forward now to contribute to re-bypassing since they have such a strong sense of civic duty?

    • Conspiratoor

       /  April 19, 2019

      Some observations if I may Al

      Daughter’s just made it to Whangas after a 4 hour epic from west aux. Slowest trip ever. The tunnel was the pinch point, 4kms took an hour! Warkworth was surprisingly clear

      The folks in those cars will all be having the same thought. ‘What if I left the night before…’ This worries me. I drove up last night at 8pm. The road was fairly clear so just on 2 hours from the north shore

      Oh and the total absence of any southbound traffic in that pic

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  April 19, 2019

        There are few things more aggravating than seeing cars whizzing along on the other side.

        It was quite bad here, but not as bad as the photo.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  April 19, 2019

        The tunnel being the point where two lanes become one lane. I guess the lack of southbound traffic eased the Warkworth bottlenecks.

        So in two year’s time we can expect the bottleneck to have moved to just before the Dome valley and the Coalition of Losers pretending to be a Government to have done absolutely nothing to make any progress beyond that.

    • Blazer

       /  April 19, 2019

      loony lefties again..Al?

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  April 19, 2019

    While Labour and the Greens play with their train sets.