Jacinda Ardern on CNN on gun laws and extremist use of social media

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda is getting more international attention after speaking to CNN as she prepares for meetings and a summit in Paris on the use of social media by violent extremists.

CNN:  New Zealand’s Jacinda Ardern ‘does not understand’ why US has failed to toughen gun laws

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she does “not understand” why the United States has not passed stronger gun laws in the aftermath of mass shooting events.

Ahead of a summit on online extremism, Ardern was responding to a question by CNN’s Christiane Amanpour asking whether countries can learn from New Zealand.

The Prime Minister said guns have a “practical purpose” in New Zealand but “that does not mean you need access to military-style semiautomatic weapons and assault rifles.”

“Australia experienced a massacre and changed their laws. New Zealand had its experience and changed its laws. To be honest, I do not understand the United States”.

On Ardern’s ‘Christchurch Call’:

Ardern told CNN on Tuesday that the meeting “is not about regulation, it is about bringing companies to the table,” adding that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has given “Facebook’s support to this call to action.”

The focus will “very much be on violent extremism,” she said. The pledge will not limit or curtail “the freedom of expression.”

Facebook removed 1.5 million videos of the Christchurch attacks in the first 24 hours after the massacre. It also blocked 1.2 million of them at upload, meaning they would not have been seen by users.

“When it came to the way this attack was specifically designed to be broadcast and to go viral, (responding) to that needed a global solution, so that was why we immediately got in contact with international counterparts”.

RNZ also covered this, and have details on what is happening in Paris.

Ms Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron are hosting the meeting of world leaders and tech giants to look at how to stop extremism spreading online.

Heads of state from Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Norway, Jordan, Senegal, Indonesia and the European Union are attending, though US President Donald Trump is absent.

Ms Ardern said co-operation on ending extremist content online was the least that should be expected from Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook is absent from the meeting but the social media company’s vice-president of global affairs, Nick Clegg, is there.

“I’ve spoken to Mark Zuckerberg directly, twice now, and actually we’ve had good ongoing engagement with Facebook. Last time I spoke to him a matter of days ago he did give Facebook support to this call to action.”

Ms Ardern said governments cannot ignore the way people are being radicalised, and had a role to play in preventing it.

The Prime Minister is holding a series of one-on-one meetings today with British Prime Minister Theresa May, the King of Jordan, Norway’s Elna Solberg and Twitter boss Jack Dorsey.

She will have an hour-long lunch with the French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace ahead of the Christchurch Call summit. Tomorrow, she will attend the Tech for Good dinner where she’ll make a speech before a meeting with Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

There have been some questions about whether Ardern will achieve anything in Paris. I think that’s premature.  She has already achieved some significant attention, including the involvement of some other world leaders.

We will see what suggestions or plans come out of the Paris initiative over the next day or two, but I expect it will take time for things to change.

We won’t know for some time how effective any changes might be.

 

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22 Comments

  1. Reply
  2. Reply
  3. David

     /  15th May 2019

    She needs to give this a mighty push. CNNs ratings are down the toilet Kiwiblog has better numbers and few take the network seriously anymore, meeting with the toxic Theresa May is probably just as tainting as her party is now less popular the Nigel Farage,s and who cares what a Norwegian has to say about anything ever.
    She needs to be bold or this is going to go down as a small side meeting of little importance, perhaps announce the banning of livestreaming in NZ or suspending Facebook here until they fix things. Its a shame I was hoping she could have had a better reception, its all looking a little shabby.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  15th May 2019

      Fox news channel last week prime time
      2,352,000 viewers
      They lead what is called ‘cable news’ but are still a tiny audience compared to other big shows or news services
      NZ is roughly 1.5% of US population ( 330 mill), so in NZ terms that 35,000 viewers. Its a lot less information online about NZ TV shows ratings , but something like 500,000 + viewers for One news.

      Reply
      • David

         /  15th May 2019

        Exactly my point and CNN rates a third of what Fox does, its irrelevant.

        Reply
  4. adamsmith1922

     /  15th May 2019

    You note that Ardern proclaims commitment to free speech, but is that true given the recent Newshub report
    https://adamsmith.wordpress.com/2019/05/15/its-wednesday-and-another-politician-wants-to-restrict-what-we-seehear-and-say/

    Reply
  5. Ray

     /  15th May 2019

    Miss Ardern says she doesn’t understand the USA.
    Can we add that to the list of other things she doesn’t understand like the economy, the difference between GDP and Criwn Accounts, business confidence, etc.
    I also don’t think it will add to our long relationship with the US to say you don’t understand their system.
    Point the one, the President (despite what the present incumbent thinks) cannot act as a one horse band and change the law.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  15th May 2019

      mixing your metaphors today

      The former P.M who…’loved everything about the U.S.A’ has departed….who else they got?

      Reply
    • David

       /  15th May 2019

      The 2nd amendment is pretty popular across both parties and gun ownership is in their DNA, its pretty easy to understand. Bit like commenting on the mystery that legalizing homosexuality in Saudi Arabia hasnt happened.

      Reply
  6. Corky

     /  15th May 2019

    ”New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she does “not understand” why the United States has not passed stronger gun laws in the aftermath of mass shooting events.”

    Because, dear leader, the founding fathers knew people like you would always exist. People
    who given the right circumstances, can and have become dedicators. Let’s see:

    1- Hate speech legislation in the pipeline.
    2-Regulation of social media not off the table.
    3- Removal of firearms from the law abiding while criminals at the moment have no fear about not handing there weapons in.

    People should have the right to protect themselves from the government and fellow citizens.

    Lest we forget:

    Don’t ever think for a moment this thin veneer of democracy and supposed freedoms we enjoy can’t disappear overnight..it can. The way things are going people may soon need to make serious decisions about what this country stands for..and what freedoms should be our right to enjoy.

    https://www.dailyherald.com/article/20130127/discuss/701279952/#sections

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  15th May 2019

      You are the one who is missing the point.

      The right to bear arms was made when the country was at war, which it isn’t now. It was not meant to mean that any loony can commit mass murder because they can do it easily with legal weapons.

      The schoolchildren who are murdered are no threat to anyone and I can’t see how a school massacre can be called protection from the government and fellow citizens.

      People who are massacred in cinemas, at concerts and in the street are not threatening their murderers. Call me naive if you will, but to me a small child’s right to go to school and not come home in a coffin is greater than the right of some sick bastard with a tiny prick to slaughter them with a machine gun. The Las Vegas massacre was mass murder.

      It astounds me that anyone can’t see that someone’s right to not be murdered is greater than someone else’s right to slaughter them.

      Reply
      • David

         /  15th May 2019

        The Americans see their gun ownership as their right not to get murdered, mistakenly but that is their philosophy.
        There is little appetite beyond background checks to disarm.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  15th May 2019

          In some places they don’t even have that, and a town in Texas makes its living from some sort of attachment to make rifles into machine guns (or something like that)

          Many Americans do want more gun control, but that’s a dream unlikely to come true.

          Reply
          • David

             /  15th May 2019

            And Chicago has some tough gun laws and its murder central. Because it happens in black neighborhoods to black people the Democrats running the city dont give a shit. Only 755 people have been shot so far this year which is down a 100 or so on last year. Its just absurd.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  15th May 2019

              1500 + in a year.

              If you round their population up to 3,000,000 for ease of calculation, that’s 500 for every million. We’d have to have over 2000 shooting murders a year here to be the same (I am rounding up figures in all cases, of course for ease of calculation so am aware that these are rough and not precise)

      • Pink David

         /  15th May 2019

        “It astounds me that anyone can’t see that someone’s right to not be murdered is greater than someone else’s right to slaughter them.”

        Perhaps we should make murder illegal and then no one will do it again.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  15th May 2019

          Drink drivers who kill the innocent. That’s already illegal, but they kill many each year.
          I guess it’s just part of living in a modern world. Always pays to kiss the whanau good bye in the morning. No guarantees you will be coming back..especially on Auckland roads.

          Reply
  7. Corky

     /  15th May 2019

    I guess it boils down to naivety v history. Fools never learn from history, believing they are safe in their backyards. History teaches different.

    Why, it’s still in living memory, just a handful of decades in the scheme of things, that we could have become an occupied country. Many of those presently pontificating on gun control may never have been born because our parents and linage would have been wiped out.

    Reply
  8. harryk

     /  15th May 2019

    “Australia experienced a massacre and changed their laws. New Zealand had its experience and changed its laws. To be honest, I do not understand the United States”.

    So Ms Ardern, pls explain why, after Australia changed our gun laws, NZ didn’t follow the example and had to wait until it’s own massacre? Reactive rather than proactive politicians, including yourself. What’s not to understand? The US is a mirror image of yourself pre Christchurch. Stop shifting the blame to intelligence agencies and the media. Politicians could have, should have, prevented it. You didn’t. When it was hard and no votes in it you [collectively] squibbed, just as US pollies are doing now.

    Reply
  9. Reply
    • harryk

       /  15th May 2019

      Oh to be a fly on that wall…

      Press Freedom Status: Not Free

      ‘The government tolerates modest criticism of state officials and policies. However, journalists risk arrest under a variety of restrictive laws, and much of the media sector is state-run. A number of journalists were arrested during 2015 in connection with reporting on foreign affairs and their impact on Jordan, including the conflicts in Syria and Yemen. Journalists routinely self-censor, and are aware of certain “red lines” that may not be crossed in reporting, including critical coverage of the royal family’

      https://freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-press/2016/jordan

      Reply

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