Australian election – Morrison returned as Prime Minister

Despite late polls giving a slight advantage to Labor their leader Bill Shorten has conceded to incumbent Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Stuff – Bill Shorten concedes defeat, Scott Morrison to return as PM

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has claimed victory in a stunning political “miracle” that has devastated the Labor Party, forced Bill Shorten to step down as its leader and reshaped Australian politics.

Shorten had been favoured in exit polls and made significant gains in some seats in New South Wales and Victoria, while independent candidate Zali Steggall defeated former prime minister Tony Abbott in Warringah.

But his bid to become Australia’s 31st Prime Minister – through a platform of tax, wages and climate policy reform – was in deep trouble with his party suffering damaging defeats in key electorates the party needed to claim power.

Mr Shorten announced he would stand down as Labor leader while staying in Parliament, adding the federal election campaign had been “toxic at times” but that Labor had fought for ambitious change.

The election result was yet to be finalised at the end of election night, with several seats in doubt, but the Coalition defied the opinion polls to hold its ground and win seats from Labor.

With almost three quarters of the vote counted, the Coalition had 74 of the 151 seats in the House of Representatives and was within sight of forming government in its own right or with support in a hung Parliament.

Any result would have been dramatic. When was the last time an Australian Prime Minister won an election?

But:

However, the result shows the nation is divided along geographic and ideological lines with Mr Abbott declaring a political “realignment” with Labor making gains in progressive wealthy seats and the Coalition doing better in working class areas.

A group of key independents could still hold the key to power.

Neither of the major parties are popular in Australia.

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91 Comments

  1. David

     /  19th May 2019

    Isnt it a funny trend we have seen with the traditional right parties now doing great with the “working/middle class” and the left grabbing the rich elites.
    The US, England, here and now Australia.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  19th May 2019

      Did you see the Liberals election bribes ? The nationals have always been strong supporter of government funded everything for the rural sector

      Reply
      • David

         /  19th May 2019

        I am flattered you have the desire to comment on every comment I make, its got me all a flutter. Sooner or later there will be an actual point made but lets see what happens.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  19th May 2019

          Its a blog . Comments are what happens.
          You have stars in your eyes to think differently

          Reply
  2. MaureenW

     /  19th May 2019

    I watched Shorten and Morrison campaigning and doing news, Q&A last week – it’s no wonder the voters don’t like them, they both came across as a pair of self-serving twats.

    I did’t get the sense that either of them were connecting. Smile at a camera, kiss a baby, pat an old bloke on the shoulder, rinse and repeat.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  19th May 2019

      You forgot eating a hamburger while meeting and greeting. What is it with politicians and pies and hamburgers? Is it meant to imply they are just like the ordinary bloke?

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  19th May 2019

        might be something in that…Abbott bit into an onion=gone,Key tried to swallow a hotdog…whole=…

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  19th May 2019

          Now jet setting around the world and sitting on high powered boards. Meanwhile in Aotearoa.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  19th May 2019

            Boards ? You mean like the ANZ who have been punished by Reserve Bank for ignoring the rules, despite ‘The Board’ certifying they were. So it wasnt something Key and his board members werent told about. Key is Chairman of ANZ in NZ.
            Its looking like hes got the Jenny Shipley syndrome

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  19th May 2019

              Maybe I should have said business interests. But talking of the ANZ, that position just pays for his fun in Hawaii. I don’t think he worries about ANZ’s small print. He just signs off on the audits. The point is..he has a lot of money, and folk like you and Blazer don’t. That’s the hard realities of life my friend.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  19th May 2019

            Jetsetters are rich people who fly around for pleasure, not those who do it for a reason such as going to attend a board meeting. The expression came about in the 60s, I think, when jets were much more of a novelty and status symbol.

            Reply
  3. Pink David

     /  19th May 2019

    The Guardian livestream comments on the results were most entertaining.

    “I am devastated. I don’t understand this. I really don’t. I am crying actual tears. ”

    Oh, and Clive Palmer proves that money rarely buys and election.

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  19th May 2019

    After the turmoil in the Government it must have taken real self-delusion for Labor to lose this one.

    Reply
  5. Corkly

     /  19th May 2019

    I wonder if climate policies were a major factor in Labours election loss? If so, that’s good. It means Aussies have chosen reality over conjecture and blame.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  19th May 2019

      tried and true right wing scare tactics won the day.

      The greedy generation saw recessionary headwinds and contraction in RE values, and voted for the party they perceive can maintain their individual…wealth.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  19th May 2019

        “tried and true right wing scare tactics won the day.”

        Given the ALP were promoting this as an election to save the earth, and voting for anyone else would be a vote for planetary doom, I think the scare tactics lost.

        “Despite enduring its hottest year on record and a series of environmental calamities that have brought the climate emergency into sharp relief, Australia has voted for the centre-right Liberal party and its coalition partner, and against taking forceful action on the climate crisis.”

        https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/may/18/australias-ruling-coalition-claims-election-victory-in-major-upset

        Reply
      • David

         /  19th May 2019

        True, we had the opposite here where National had created a really strongly performing economy so people felt safe enough to give Labour a go. We had growth of 4% and English in charge yet they were still turfed out.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  19th May 2019

          Created an economy based on immigration ( growth per capita wasnt like that)- best was only 3.4% and borrowing even with high employment.

          Reply
          • David

             /  19th May 2019

            Again no point of interest to your comments, the stalking is a bit odd though. Let me try again, when the economy is doing well and has been for quite a while voters feel safe enough to take a punt and when things are looking a bit dicey they are more likely to stick with the status quo as long as they are reasonable stewards of the economy.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  19th May 2019

              The actual election result had national as the loser- proving your assumptions are false.

    • Maggy Wassilieff

       /  19th May 2019

      Well a heck of a lot of advertising/ campaign money trying to convince Aussies they were in a “climate emergency” has just gone up in smoke.
      http://joannenova.com.au/2019/05/it-was-a-climate-election-and-the-skeptics-won-australia-2019/

      Reply
      • Dennis Horne

         /  19th May 2019

        No such thing as a climate science sceptic, just people who don’t accept incontrovertible evidence and apparently irrefutable science. Loonies.

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  19th May 2019

          “No such thing as a climate science sceptic, just people who don’t accept incontrovertible evidence and apparently irrefutable science. Loonies.”

          Your religious fundamentalism has no place in a reasoned debate.

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  19th May 2019

          You mean anyone who disagrees with you, Dennis. Scientist you are not.

          Reply
  6. david in aus

     /  19th May 2019

    Labor’s tax policies hurt them. Retirees voted against them in record numbers. My parents who had voted Labor in the past were adamantly against them and wouldn’t trust them again.

    Early polls reflected the lack of popularity of the Liberal government, I would agree. But when there is an Election, the actual policies come into focus. I suspect the plunging property market had an affect when your wealth disappears, are you going to vote for a party that wants that to continue?

    Tax Tax Tax, Spend Spend Spend; at the end was political death.

    Reply
    • david in aus

       /  19th May 2019

      I also wonder whether cultural war factors came in to play. Israel Folau’s case was in the news and was the most commented news article. It galvanized those supporting Religious Freedom and hurt the Left and the Cross-bench.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  19th May 2019

        He still doesn’t seem to get it that telling people that Hell awaits them was what was objected to, not his expressing his religious views per se. If he had been openly Christian as others are, nobody would mind at all. It’s high-handedly taking it on himself to tell people that they were going to Hell when they died that got people’s backs up. Especially as he was doing it in his role as whatever the team is player and not as an individual.

        We all knew that Michael Jones wouldn’t play on Sundays; it was a non-issue as it was obviously his own choice and he didn’t condemn those who did as far as I remember.

        Reply
    • Duker

       /  19th May 2019

      Did you see the liberals spending policies – Its been called the biggest give away since Whitlam. There was no project too small or too large for promise of federal money. Sports clubs, schools retired centres were showered with cash.
      They used the power of being in government to spread it all around , now they dont have a majority of seats to pay for it.

      Reply
      • david in aus

         /  19th May 2019

        It is relative. The Liberal/National party were not proposing new taxes or increases, but instead tax relief.

        Reply
        • david in aus

           /  19th May 2019

          Remember, when there are no adjustments of tax thresholds for inflation, they are effectively annual tax increases. The Liberals promised tax relief after years of tax increases. Labor wanted more and more taxes.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  19th May 2019

            They will get tax increases – just the voters havent been told yet.
            Borrowing in the last 6 years increased by $300 bill – the inherited debt from labour was $290 ,

            Reply
  7. David

     /  19th May 2019

    The bookies took a big hit and one punter dropped a million on Labor winning.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  19th May 2019

      They only took a hit because ‘one’ payed out early on labour winning ? Otherwise they would win when the favourite loses

      Reply
      • David

         /  19th May 2019

        Again, its getting creepy. In betting markets they use system called “odds” and mostly these vary between outcomes so when the favorite doesnt win at low odds but the underdog wins at greater odds the bookies can take a hit.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  19th May 2019

          Where do you get your nonsense. The aim is to make money no matter the result, however when a heavily backed favourite loses its a windfall for bookies.

          Paying out early doesnt make sense to me. But of course the amount isnt that large compared to weekly turnover.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  19th May 2019

            “a heavily backed favourite loses its a windfall for bookies.”

            Isn’t the point of being a bookie that no matter who loses, it’s a windfall for the bookie?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  19th May 2019

              Yep, the payouts are inversely proportional to the support less the bookies’ profit. Except the Sportsbet idiots are paying out to both winners and losers now.

  8. Zedd

     /  19th May 2019

    reminds me of the satirical ads for Q-land ‘beautiful one day… south Africa the next’.. (instead of ‘fabulous the next’) ?

    majority showing their true colours; staunchly Alt-Right…. eg Pauline Hanson etc. ! 😦

    Reply
    • Zedd

       /  19th May 2019

      when I lived there; Sir Joh Bejelke-Petersen was the Premier.. says it all

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  19th May 2019

        Turned the state into a high growth success while NSW and Vic slumped though, Zedd.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  19th May 2019

          how did he do that..Al?

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  19th May 2019

            Better roads and lower tax and regulation I guess, B.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  19th May 2019

              foreign investment(and a few backhanders),on a blank canvas ,as it were.

              Petersen represented everything wrong with politics,-cronyism,corruption ,incompetence and the gerrymander system that allowed him to continue in spite of representing a ..minority of voters.

        • Zedd

           /  19th May 2019

          maybe so.. BUT only for the wealthy.. a typical Tory 😦

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  19th May 2019

            That’s your mistake, Z. He and Key took votes from the Left to win.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  19th May 2019

              As did Trump. Clinton milked the wealthy elite vote. Weird, isn’t it?

  9. Reply
    • david in aus

       /  19th May 2019

      Actually, Labor lost it!

      I don’t think people voted for the Liberal/National Party, they voted against the Labor party.
      Bill Shorten wasn’t the problem, he was a competent operator. The problem was the message.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  19th May 2019

        The Liberals bought their win
        ‘Phased in tax cuts. The Coalition’s signature election policy. It will provide tax breaks for more than 10 million Australians and simplify the system by removing the 37 per cent tax bracket entirely. The measures will cost Treasury coffers $158 billion over 10 years, but don’t hold your breath for them all.’

        Dont forget the actual in your hand refunds THIS YEAR
        “The most immediate benefit of the Coalition’s tax policy will come from July 1 this year. Australians earning less than $37,000 will get a gift of up to $255 with their tax returns. If you’re earning between $48,000 and $90,000, you will get $1080.

        Even splurge for business in depreciation ‘instant writeoffs- which cuts taxable income.
        ‘Instant asset write-off. As part of the 2019 budget, businesses turning more than $50 million can write-off assets against their taxable income. Previously, businesses turning over more than $10 million were excluded from the scheme.

        Climate ? Same as labour
        ‘The Coalition has committed Australia to reduce its emissions by 26 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030, in line with the Paris targets.’

        Schools
        ‘Schools. The Coalition has promised a $4.6 billion package for Catholic and Independent schools, which comes on top of $23.5 billion over 10 years for all schools

        Childcare , some free hours
        ‘ The budget pledged $453 million to fund four-year-old kindergarten for another year and ensure children have access to 15 hours a week of preschool in the year before school

        “Inland rail. The Coalition has promised $9.3 billion for a 1700 kilometre freight line from Melbourne to Brisbane,
        Roads – plenty of billions for that – Road Building is Vote Building

        https://www.smh.com.au/federal-election-2019/what-the-morrison-government-promised-to-do-next-20190518-p51ore.html

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  19th May 2019

          “The Liberals bought their win”

          My god, giving people what they want! I can’t believe politics has sunk so low. Back in the day, you just lied to them about this stuff, you are not meant to deliver…..100,000 houses? Sure! No problem, just fill in the form here…

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  19th May 2019

            “Inland rail. The Coalition has promised $9.3 billion for a 1700 kilometre freight line from Melbourne to Brisbane,”

            Reply
            • Pink David

               /  19th May 2019

              I never realised those Queenslander’s needed quite that tonnage of latte’s.

        • Dennis Horne

           /  19th May 2019

          Morrison is on record saying Australia will meet the Paris emissions commitment in a canter — without actually doing anything! Another fundamental Christian who believes in miracles — actually he said as much.

          Next he’ll be donating taxpayers’ money to the Adani Indian family to open the Carmichael coal mine that no bank will touch.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  19th May 2019

            “Another fundamental Christian who believes in miracle”

            Technology really is a miracle isn’t it.

            Reply
  10. This isn’t a surprise.

    Reply
  11. Zedd

     /  19th May 2019

    just proves the old addage.. ‘the only poll that really matters.. IS election day’

    echoes of 2017 in Aotearoa/NZ, when several polls were suggesting ‘3 more years for Nat-act’ ho ho 😀

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  19th May 2019

      Only because Auntie Winnie held everyone to ransom again.

      Reply
  12. Tom Hunter

     /  19th May 2019

    ‘the only poll that really matters.. IS election day’

    Indeed.

    Reply
  13. Tom Hunter

     /  19th May 2019

    54 polls in a row won by Labor to be precise.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  19th May 2019

      Those were ‘ 2 party party preferred’ ( when they assume preferences go a certain way) when the raw numbers were different…. Nationwide polling when a government is formed from ‘seats’ has been shown to be a fail- similar to US were national polls with small lead to Clinton but the election is one by states and votes in Electoral College.

      Reply
    • Tom Hunter

       /  19th May 2019

      Sure. Hindsight. But when making predictions you’d think those pollsters would have tried to develop something more sophisticated to deal with preference voting OR simply not made predictions without putting in these caveats.

      Won’t make any difference: I predict the Aussie pollsters and their media luvvies will be just as stupid next time around, except their might then be a landslide that covers up their mistakes.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  19th May 2019

        Margin of error is usually a few % , election itself was within that range. Plus science of polling says you will get something like one out of every 10 polls ‘simply wrong’

        if anything having the polls against meant the Liberals threw money at the voters and it worked!
        They have borrowed up big in the last 6 years, – debt has risen from $290 bill to $585 bill , without a GFC to blame for that
        Increase in debt in 6 years under Coalition by $300 bill reaching $80 bill in 2016-17

        ” tax revenue increased from $337.7 billion to $427.2 billion in 2018, an increase of 26.7 per cent.”
        Yes population has increased but tax raised per capita has increased

        yet Morrison said!
        Coalition will “maintain the budget surpluses and pay down debt”

        The official figures show that is a lie ( Annual Budget numbers are contrived reality show)
        Bureau of Statistics
        – Government Finance Statistics
        https://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/abs@.nsf/0/87BD4B2C1A8997B3CA25745C00149946?OpenDocument

        Reply
  14. Duker

     /  19th May 2019

    An Australian website looks at the pre election polls and was worried by what he didnt find- a normal distribution ‘spread’
    The suggestion was that the Pollsters were ‘herding’ where the adjustments were done to match the ‘herd’ of other polls

    ‘Marktheballot’ did some calculations
    The probability of 13 polls in a row at 48 or 49 per cent is 0.000059″ of course based on a normal distribution .
    These comments were done BEFORE the election
    https://marktheballot.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2019-05-09T08:04:00%2B10:00&max-results=7

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  19th May 2019

      Very pertinent, Duker. Definitely something very fishy in those results. Either non random sampliing or manipulated data.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  19th May 2019

        Australian preferential voting system means you have to manipulate the numbers to get the strange bird called “two party preferred’ for the whole country. And of course a nationwide number doesnt count when you can still win seats by close margins

        It seems that Morrison like Turnbull before him had ditched the ‘Liberal’ brand and ran on their own personal brand. The result however is still unstable as we would see it-

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  19th May 2019

        Farrar picked Labor to get 80 seats so he obviously didn’t note this warning sign about the polling results.

        Reply
        • Maggy Wassilieff

           /  19th May 2019

          Farrar picked a Democrat win back in the USA election also.
          It pays to have contacts beyond the MSM bubble.

          Reply
  15. Duker

     /  19th May 2019

    Just checking the Aussie papers this morning- and apart from the results a complete lack of stories.
    My guess a lot of their journalist pre wrote their stories ( more common than you think) with only a few changes for the actual results.
    Of course such stories cant be published now , so back to ‘whatever’

    Reply
  16. A warning for Labour here perhaps. Greens aren’t likely to hold back.

    Greens set to retain Senate seats and increases primary vote in early count

    The Greens will retain a strong influence in the Senate after increasing their primary vote and looking set to hold all six seats it had up for reelection.

    https://www.smh.com.au/federal-election-2019/greens-set-to-retain-senate-seats-and-increases-primary-vote-in-early-count-20190518-p51oq0.html

    Reply
    • harryk

       /  19th May 2019

      ‘They elected 18% women. 82% white men’

      Where Labor could promote indigenous woemn over geriatric white men, they don’t, the Coalition does. In the NT Labor’s Snowden has been in Parliament for 30 years blocking the way for young indigenous locals to have a go. Young, local born Indigenous woman Jacinta P has cut his margin by more than half and has set herself up for a win next time. The big economic issue is fracking. Labor suppports it despite strong green left opposition. If they backtrack they’ll lose, just like Shorten.

      https://www.katherinetimes.com.au/story/6131868/labor-manages-to-hold-on-to-both-nt-seats/

      Reply
  17. Dennis Horne

     /  19th May 2019

    Turkeys voting for the oven. Literally.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  19th May 2019

      Dunno about the turkeys but much of Australia is literally an oven for much of the time.

      I guess they are used to it and are wondering what the fuss about another degree is.

      Reply
      • Dennis Horne

         /  19th May 2019

        The 1C refers to the mean global surface. Two points. 1. The mean global land surface is already 1.5C higher and increase is some areas 6C. 2. 93% of the heat due to human activity is going into the oceans.

        You may think this does not affect people but the experts do. To all intents and purposes all of them.

        Reply
        • Maggy Wassilieff

           /  19th May 2019

          Seen what’s been causing the warming in the UK.?
          hectares of concrete, asphalt and steel.
          https://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/asl.896
          Gee, man-made warming up to 1.70K….not due to CO2.

          Reply
          • Griff.

             /  19th May 2019

            Seen what’s been causing the warming in the UK.?

            Feel free to give us the passage that says the UK has warmed by 1.7C due to the heat island effect from your linked paper.
            Opps that is right it is in reference only to London and only to T min.

            Research by the University of Sheffield suggests that “less than 6% of the UK is urban”, using data from 2012.

            5.3% of the UK land surface is ‘discontinuous urban fabric’, according to the research—these include areas like suburbs around cities, rural towns and built up areas with lots of gardens, parks and planted areas. Around 0.1% was ‘continuous urban fabric’—areas with buildings and roads covering more than 80% of land surface.

            So your “UK” becomes less than 6% of the UK .

            [Deleted]

            Reply
            • Maggy Wassilieff

               /  19th May 2019

              Still resorting to Personal abuse I see.

              Do you know what the words up to mean?

            • Griff.

               /  19th May 2019

              Hello Maggy
              I am not interested in your semantic games .
              That is also bullshit .

              Seen what’s been causing the warming in the UK.?

              You tried to imply that 1.7C of the warming in the UK is due to the heat island effect.
              It is unsupportable even slightly from your linked source as 1.7C is only for T min and only for London.
              The urban land area your paper refers to makes up less than 6% of the total area of the UK.
              Simple six year old math tells you 6% is not equal to 100%.
              The most you could possible infer at an extreme stretch is 0.1 C warming of T min for the UK from the heat island effect .
              [Deleted – argue points of difference without making speculative accusations.]

            • Maggy Wassilieff

               /  19th May 2019

              This is the last sentence of the Abstract.

              This paper finds through the method of observation minus reanalysis that urbanisation has significantly increased the daily minimum 2‐m temperature in the United Kingdom by up to 1.70 K.

      • Griff.

         /  19th May 2019

        For someone with a PhD you sure are ignorant of the basics on a subject you frequently comment on Alan.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  19th May 2019

          How would you attempt to make that relevant to our discussion, Griff?

          Reply
          • Griff.

             /  19th May 2019

            I guess they are used to it and are wondering what the fuss about another degree is.

            Because increasing the mean has a far greater effect on the extremes
            In the example above a one in forty year event becomes one in six
            That is a once a life time extreme happens every six years.

            The distribution shift of real world temperatures .

            Out side of human experience.
            As CO2 levels are now higher than in the past three million years in the near future we will see meteorological events that have not been possible since Homo sapiens left the trees in Africa.
            Temperature is also related to moisture levels both drought and rainfall extremes
            We can also say we will see drought and rainfall extremes not seen in the same time span

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature
            Without limiting future emissions it will be impossible for humans to live outside in the shade during summer heat waves in large regions of the earth by the end of the century .
            https://www.inverse.com/article/34990-south-asia-unsurvivable-wet-bulb-heat-by-2100.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  19th May 2019

              Griff, the temperature has already shifted 1.5 degrees and those alarmist projections have not been felt by Joe Aussie so why should he believe another 0.5 will be any different?

  18. harryk

     /  19th May 2019

    My eldest voted for the first time. He won’t tell us for whom.

    Imagine a Union leader, a Labor leader, who puts urban climate change votes ahead of mining jobs for workers in Queensland. And a failed, recyled ex immigration Minister, who now promises to destroy the fishing industry with Marine Parks, again for urban green votes. There’s seats gone in Tasmania too. Simple really. But this is what you get from silvertail politicians who claim to represent ‘working class’ values but have never worked up a sweat in the lives. The ALP is becoming a Green Left party and deserting it’s base.

    Reply
  19. Alan Wilkinson

     /  19th May 2019

    The loony Left and furiously woke are loony furious and spitting tacks in Oz:
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=12232378

    Shades of the anti-Trump meltdowns in the US. They are threatening to move to NZ. I think we’ve heard that before.

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  19th May 2019

      A lot of hate floating about there..

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  19th May 2019

        Very sore losers. Hating is what the Left do best.

        As I’ve noted before, the Left think the Right are evil and the Right think the Left are ignorant.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  20th May 2019

          we can swap them for our ‘sore losers then’…’They are threatening to move to NZ. I think we’ve heard that before.’

          all those threatening to leave NZ for Oz after our election result.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  20th May 2019

            I remember you wanting me to go, B, and me declining.

            Reply

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