Pre-budget announcement addressing family and sexual violence

It is good to see the Government putting more into initiatives and the budget to try to address family and sexual violence better. It will be difficult, but more needs to be done. Violence is one of the biggest problems in New Zealand. It affects families, communities, health, education, imprisonment rates, employment and productivity, and increases the number of beneficiaries.


Breaking the cycle of family and sexual violence

Breaking the cycle of family and sexual violence and better supporting survivors is a major feature of the Wellbeing Budget, with the Government delivering the largest ever investment in family and sexual violence and support services.

The budget package will deliver more support services delivered to more New Zealanders, major campaigns aimed at stopping violence occurring and major changes to court process to reduce the trauma victims experience.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Parliamentary Under-Secretary Jan Logie today announced a new and collaborative approach to tackling one of the country’s most disturbing long-term challenges.

“There has never before been investment of this scale in preventing and responding to family violence and sexual violence,” Jacinda Ardern said.

“Every year about one million New Zealanders are affected by family and sexual violence, including almost 300,000 children. This is something I know New Zealand is ashamed of and the Government is taking a major step forward in fixing on the budget.

“Wellbeing means being safe and free from violence. That is why this package is such a significant cornerstone of the Wellbeing budget.

“My goal has always been for New Zealand to be the best place in the world to be a child and that means supporting parents and communities to ensure children grow up in secure homes free from violence,” Jacinda Ardern said.

The family and sexual violence package, which sits across eight portfolios, is the result of the first ever joint Budget bid from multiple government departments. It includes funding and support for:

• 1 million New Zealanders covered by Integrated Safety Response sites (Christchurch and Waikato), and 350,000 by the WhāngaiaNgā Pā Harakeke and Whiria Te Muka sites (in Gisborne, Counties Manukau and Kaitaia)
• 24/7 sexual violence crisis support services for up to 2,800 children and young people every year, and an additional 7,700 adult victims and survivors from 2020/21
• Funding for major advertising campaigns and intervention programmes to reduce violence occurring
• Using video victim statements to reduce trauma for up to 30,000 victims of family violence every year, and reduce time spent in court,
• Enabling victims of sexual violence to give evidence in court in alternative ways in order to reduce the risk of experiencing further trauma, and providing specialist training for lawyers in sexual violence cases
• specialist training for lawyers in sexual violence cases
• improving the wellbeing of male victims and survivors of sexual violence through peer support services – up to 1,760 from 2020/21 onwards
• dedicated funding for a kaupapa Māori response to sexual violence
• training for health practitioners in District Health Boards to provide effective screening and referrals for family violence
“We know this is a long-term project. The package we’re announcing today lays the foundations for a violence-free Aotearoa New Zealand,” Jan Logie, Under-Secretary to the Minister of Justice (Domestic and Sexual Violence Issues) said.

“The package announced today gives providers funding security, while making available significant extra resource to break the cycle of violence and provide more women, men and children the help they need.

“I want to acknowledge and thank Ministers Andrew Little, Carmel Sepuloni, Tracey Martin, Nanaia Mahuta, Chris Hipkins, Stuart Nash, Kelvin Davis, Iain Lees-Galloway, and Jenny Salesa for their support and commitment to this work,” Jan Logie said.

The Wellbeing Budget 2019 family violence and sexual violence package comprises initiatives across five areas:
• Preventing family violence and sexual violence [$47.8 million over 4 years]
• Safe, consistent and effective responses to family violence in every community [$84.3 million over 4 years]
• Expanding essential specialist sexual violence services: moving towards fully funding services [$131.1 million over 4 years]
• Reforming the criminal justice system to better respond to victims of sexual violence. [$37.8 million over 4 years]
• Strengthening system leadership and supporting new ways of working [$20.0 million over 4 years]
• The total monetary value of the package is $320 million (comprising new operating funding of $311.4 million, and $9.5 million of capital funding).

 

Next Post
Leave a comment

15 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  19th May 2019

    Look, good on them for trying. But the reality is money doesn’t fix these problems. We have been down this road in various guises..it doesn’t work because many people don’t want to change.

    These type of programmes should come after hardcore measures.

    1- Conviction and punishment for offenders. Hard time for hard offences.
    2- Stopping the welfare rort of baby factories. Contraception for all women beanies.
    3- Voluntary sterilisation.
    4- Basic maths and English literacy a must before moving on from primary school. That means you stay behind until you can add 2+2.
    5- Limiting judges powers at sentencing with regards to good behaviour, being middleclass or a first time offender. General population for all offenders.

    It should be obvious to these liberal lushes that the solution must be generational. The present generations are a lost cause. Anything applied to them will just be a band-aid

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  19th May 2019

      Women beanies ? Beanies are woolly hats.

      There is voluntary sterilisation now.

      I can’t comment on the drinking habits of these ‘lushes’ (American-speak for drunkards) so don’t know if they are that or not.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  19th May 2019

        You claim to have family members who are on benefits, like the niece who was given all those things by WINZ despite WINZ specifying these as things that they did NOT pay for.

        Do you call them beanies (a disgustingly offensive term) and advocate forced contraception for them ?

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  19th May 2019

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  19th May 2019

        That is not an answer. It just shows that you have nothing meaningful to say.

        Just answer; do you call your supposed rellies beanies, tell them they should be sterilised or have compulsory contraception because your niece is, in your words, a baby factory ?

        Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  19th May 2019

    Looks like creating yet another bureaucratic industry – the family violence industry – which will be utterly dependent on maintaining the problem.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  19th May 2019

      How do they expect to prevent it ?

      There are laws against it now. That doesn’t stop it. There are organisations and campaigns.

      Good luck with being the only place where money will stop violence.

      Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  19th May 2019

    First step would be to address their own lies – for example that violence affects all classes and cultures equally. No it doesn’t. It disproportionately affects poor and Maori.

    1. Get people working.
    2. Get them ownership of property and their own lives.
    3. Teach them to think for themselves and not follow the group.

    That would be leadership. I don’t see it coming from Ardern and it will never come from bureaucrats.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  19th May 2019

      I can think of people who are middle-class and Pakeha and have been on the receiving end of domestic violence. A local estate agent was married to a man who was also a ‘professional’ and who at first only hit her where the bruises wouldn’t show. When he broke her jaw, she decided that she’d had enough. I was in a violent relationship myself with a man who was from one of Christchurch’s longest established families, went to Christ’s College (is that the famous Chch school ?) was a PhD and a university lecturer. He was a well-known actor and had worked for Foreign Affairs. If I said the names of the people we knew as friends I’d be accused of name-dropping. This didn’t mean anything when it came to being violent. It wasn’t like Jake the Muss, but it still happened.

      A girl I knew was convinced that her boyfriend, later fiance, would stop hitting her when they were married because he wouldn’t be jealous then.Yeah, right.

      I am glad that I offered my sofa (I only had a one bedroom flat) to another girl in a violent relationship and said that she could just turn up if she needed to. It wasn’t needed, but I know that she was very glad to know that if she hadn’t been able to find somewhere else my sofa was there.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  19th May 2019

        Yes, these happen and hopefully are getting less tolerated and frequent. And these women usually have more resources and support. That’s not to say my list above is all that needs doing, just that it would tackle the awful subculture in which violence is rife.

        Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  19th May 2019

      Alan, I was reading about Bunnings’ flatpack houses….do you know what the building cost of such places is ? Finding out’s like pulling teeth. I wondered if it would be worth it when for less than $40,000 more a prefab house with permit and fittings (even dunny roll holders !) can be put down on a section all ready to move into. All you’d need is furniture (and a fridge and washing machine; the stove is included) and curtains.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  19th May 2019

        I’ve actually got an enquiry in to find the answers, Kitty. Looking for a solution to help a friend.

        Another option I’m exploring is a big garage we built at Bland Bay designed by an engineer friend with easily built wooden portal frames. At 6x12m with a 3m stud height and a pitched roof it was big enough for half to have a mezzanine floor above and be a small house in itself of about 60sqm with living area below and bedrooms above. Another friend built his own and converted it just like that at minimal cost. The other half remained a double garage come storage area. The only thing stopping these being affordable is bureaucracy.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  19th May 2019

          Someone near me put a removed garage up and converted the roof space,

          I saw that the kitsets take three months to build on site as opposed to 6 weeks for a prefab transportable to be made in a huge shed in a very streamlined way. It seems unlikely that builders would charge much less than $40,000 for three months work and as the BuiltSmarts (I am tired of the overused word ‘smart;) have everything except washing machine and fridge, if I was thinking of doing this I’d buy one of theirs. PLB in Huntly also does these houses, I think. All I’d have to pay extra for would be the connection to services as even the permit’s included.

          I don’t know, of course, what a building firm charges for a week.

          Phil Twyford said that he had no memory of a conversation with one of the Huntly building firm owners who thought that these would be excellent KiwiBuild houses, as they would be. But the news had a long story about them and how they are made and all that sort of thing…free advertising ! It also made Phil Twyford look silly as he didn’t consider this great option.

          These houses are good enough for anyone to live in; they waste no space at all. The idea of just parking one on a site and moving in is an appealing one !

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  19th May 2019

          Thank you !

          I think that the Waikato versions look less cheap and stamped out than the Bunnings ones, and as they are readymade, you don’t have to pay for that as well as the house. The Bunnings ones did look a bit plastic in those photos.

          Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s