School pupil climate change protests

Thousands of school pupils took to the streets today in protest about a lack of action on climate change. They had also protested on 15 March but that was overshadowed by the Christchurch mass shooting.

It’s good to see teenagers prepared to speak up about issues that are important to them, and to many, climate change inaction is of extreme importance and urgency.

RNZ:  Thousands of children across New Zealand turn out for climate change strikes

The second round of climate change strikes have been taking place today with thousands of school and tertiary students around Aotearoa skipping classes to take part.

Around 1000 turn out in Auckland

The Auckland Schools Strike for Climate wrapped up after 1000 students lay down on Queen St in protest with students from at least 20 schools taking part.

They were chanting and holding signs, and with police escorts, shut down entire blocks of Queen St as they lay down, and chanted “Wake Up”.

Wellington students call for declaration of climate change emergency

In Wellington, student leaders at the school strike for climate have urged the government to toughen up its zero carbon bill.

Thousands of students marched from Civic Square, through downtown Wellington to Parliament in Wellington, where they urged MPs to move the goal for net zero carbon emissions from 2050 to 2040.

They also called for Parliament to declare a climate emergency.

Strike leaders told the rally the world is in an emergency and political leaders need to act.

Christchurch students also turn out after 15 March strike cut short

More than 200 students and parents gathered in Christchurch, where the first school strike on 15 March was cut short by news of the mosque attacks.

Zahra Husseini said the well-being of the environment is emphasised in her religion.

“It’s very important we look after our nature, our environment because it affects our personal well-being as well in our community.”

‘Our education won’t mean anything … if the world is in flames’ – Nelson student

In Nelson, hundreds of students from schools throughout Nelson and Tasman marched down the main street.

A large crowd gathered on the Church Steps, before the students chanted their way along Trafalgar Street, attracting huge support from onlookers.

Stuff: Kiwi school students strike again for urgent action on climate change

Thousands of youngsters nationwide dropped pens for placards on Friday, calling for urgent action on climate change for the second time.

In Wellington, students gathered in Wellington’s Te Ngākau, Civic Square, before marching through the streets to Parliament.

The crowds shouted “no more coal, no more oil, keep your carbon in the soil”, calling for “climate justice” and drastic action by political leaders to enforce change. Adults shouted support to protesters as they bee-lined toward the Beehive.

Stuff – Hear our voice: Waikato and Coromandel students demand climate change action

In Hamilton, about 300 students converged on Civic Square on Friday afternoon to chant slogans, wave banners, and to grill politicians on environmental issues.

In Thames, students called on MPs and the council to take urgent action to address climate change.

Meanwhile, south of Hamilton, the Cambridge Tree Trust put on its own climate strike outside Cambridge Town Hall.

Charlotte Matthews, nine, took the day off school to support the protest and said politicians need to treat climate change as an emergency.

ODT:

School pupils and students marched along George St in Dunedin today, as part of strike action aimed at sending a message to New Zealand politicians about the urgency of climate action.

Zedd reports from Dunedin:

just got back, about an hour ago.. about 1000 attendees, mostly school kids, but also; quite a crowd of ‘we older folks too’

whilst they are often seen as ‘all noise’.. at least they are out there making it, as opposed to APATHY !

nga mihi ki a koutou 🙂

Expect this to be ongoing.

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30 Comments

  1. Patzcuaro

     /  24th May 2019

    Our children have the most skin in the game, more power to them. It reminds me of 1981 and the Springbok tour, no prizes for guessing which side I was on.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  24th May 2019

      Free, free, free Nelson Mandela ! (x 2)…Are you so blind that you cannot see ? Are you so deaf that you cannot hear ? Are you so (I forget the rest )

      Rugby players have leather balls !

      Jump to stop the tour ! (to the rednecks on the balcony of the Caledonian Hotel)

      Amandla (x 2) Amandla (naweto?

      Reply
      • Kimbo

         /  24th May 2019

        Almost right. The Special A.K.A.’s “Free Nelson Mandela” was not released until 1984. Comes with being young during those years.

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Nelson_Mandela

        I think as Steve Biko’s death was only four years before, and the third test match that year was played on the anniversary of his death (September 12), he was the figure around whom protestor consciousness-raising focused in 1981.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  25th May 2019

          My mistake; I could have sworn that we were chanting that in the Tour.

          Steve Biko committed suicide by beating himself up and bashing his head against a wall…yeah, right.

          I was on the calendar, I am one of the ones carrying shields that spell STOP THE TOUR. To my great delight, I found the book with the photos in a book fair a few years ago..

          I have posters and memorabilia from the era; inc. the red badge; these really are museum pieces, I suppose. I have the little Soweto posters and Molesworth one…thank goodness they somehow weren’t lost when we lost almost everything else in England.

          Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th May 2019

      No, the poor have the most skin in the game. They are most likely to be killed by climate alarmism.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  24th May 2019

        Not to mention the one’s hardest hit by ‘climate taxes’. We see it in London with the introduction of the new Ultra Low Emissions Zone (ULEZ) where vehicles over a certain age are subject to a 12 pound per day tax (that is on the vehicle not one tax on the owner).

        Sadly it is the poor, who are unable to upgrade to newer cars, who are left paying this tax, they are also the ones who were sucked in by the previous Labour Government to buying diesel because the then Transport Secretary (who I understand was Sadiq Khan) said they were better for the environment, and gave them subsidies to buy the vehicles. Now Khan is financially penalising those same people for buying the vehicles he told them to buy, but not helping them with upgrading to a newer and better vehicle.

        Only the wealthy can afford to be concerned about climate change, they are the one’s least likely to be negatively impacted by the resulting levies and taxes.

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  24th May 2019

          The yellow jacket protests in France are largely a reaction against Green Taxes

          Reply
        • Blazer

           /  24th May 2019

          ‘sadly’..predictably you mean.
          Privatise the profits,socialise the losses the reality of globalisation since the 80’s.

          Reply
        • Missy

           /  24th May 2019

          Nice to see at least two people on this blog think that it is okay to financially disadvantage poor folk for their ideological view that a load of ‘climate taxes’ will fix climate change.

          Taxing poor people who can’t always afford to have more energy efficient lifestyles or low emissions transport options will not fix the problem, but that seems to be the only solution many of these climate change fanatics can come up with, and the more we tax for climate issues the poorer the poor will get.

          During the extinction rebellion protests in London Emma Thompson flew from LA to London to attend the protest and tell the poor people to get fancy new electric cars and stop flying – she then flew back to LA. It is this that turns people against the issues, not one of the protestors had a solution beyond taxing people more, something that only harms the poorest in society. But then most of those out protesting were privileged children from wealthy families, so they wouldn’t be affected.

          Instead of these kids bunking off school and calling for more taxes why don’t the schools get creative and get them thinking about solutions, what can be done, how can technology help, how can energy production for their electric cars and mobile phones become more efficient and cost effective? Nah, that is too hard for them, much easier to bunk off school, march into town shouting meaningless slogans without actually thinking about solutions.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  25th May 2019

            You might have added that they seem unaware that many people are doing things to protect the environment already; their arrogance in this respect is very galling and antagonising. Haven’t they heard of recycling, reusing and such things ? These have been happening as long as these children have been alive, I imagine. Many people have a little container on the bench for vege scraps (mine is a small fliptop bin, $4 from KMart) en route for the compost bin.

            I hope that these self-righteous little prigs don’t use things made from/with oil like computers, phones, biros, televisions, electricity, bike tyres….most appliances….

            I hope that they don’t expect to have cars in the future (except for Flintstone types) or travel abroad. Or have modern hospitals….

            This time, they came across as self-satisfied, mouthy prigs laying down the law to people in a rude and hectoring way, not to mention an ignorant way !!!

            Reply
    • Kimbo

       /  24th May 2019

      @ Patzcuaro

      Yes, indeed. I was 14 in 1981…and would have been heartbroken if the Springboks had not toured that year. A great test series that went down to the wire. Happy youthful memories. I can still remember all the tourists’ names…Gysie Pienaar, Johan Heunis, Gerrie Germishuys…

      Oh, that’s not what you mean’t? 😀

      If it is any consolation by 1985 I had the pleasure of playing in a rugby team that comprised no only a few Pakeha/Palagi, but also nearly every nationality in the South Pacific. So when I realised you couldn’t duplicate the same inter-racial experience in South Africa, and the All Black tour to South Africa was cancelled that year, it was no big loss. So, like Ross Meurant, and some others I changed and/or modified my views. It is only the intolerant, sanctimonious, self-righteous zealots like John Minto who never forget, never learn, and never change.

      Which rather makes one wonder how many of those youthful protesters today will change their mind as they get older (I’m picking plenty) much less those much older who were facilitating/orchestrating/organising/manipulating (take your pick depending on your politics) their efforts.

      Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  24th May 2019

        Without people like John Minto knocking at the door nothing would change, sometimes he knocks on the right door and change happens the rest of the time nobody answers.

        Reply
        • Kimbo

           /  24th May 2019

          Can’t think of a single thing of consequence John Minto ever changed, including himself. Seriously.

          Sadly, the 1981 Springbok protests no effect on apartheid…ANC politicians blowing sunshine up the arse of Kiwis years later notwithstanding.

          Neither, sadly, has he changed anything in Israel/Palestine.

          But sure, if you count cultivating smug self-righteousness and a contempt for law and order and energising those whom he rails against as worthwhile change…

          Reply
        • Kimbo

           /  24th May 2019

          …and Minto’s efforts have done not a single tangible or measureable thing to alleviate poverty. Indeed, courtesy of Minto’s efforts helping the former MP for Te Tai Tokerau lose his seat in 2014, he was instrumental in likely plunging Hone Harawira’s family back into destitution!

          Reply
  2. Pink David

     /  24th May 2019

    Childrens Crusade.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  24th May 2019

      But a pointless and ill-informed one…also arrogant and very rude.

      Their bland assumption that nobody cares about the planet but them is offensive.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  24th May 2019

        It’s not their fault, it’s all the people who are lying to them.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  25th May 2019

          Who are these people lying to them ?

          Name five of them and five of the lies.

          Reply
  3. Corky

     /  24th May 2019

    A dumbed down idealistic generation. They should take a deep breath and wonder how their smart phones, computers and boy racer car accessories are made. They may also like to ask someone to name and publish all these supposed species that become extinct each day.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  24th May 2019

      Don’t faint, Corky. I agree with you up to a point.

      I don’t think that many boy racers would be there, but every child would have access to a car, phone, computer, clothes, dunny (seat, cistern), toothbrushes, shower curtains, all appliances…what are the felt pens that they wrote the signs with made of ?

      Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  24th May 2019

    A generation that has been taught to approach every issue with an open mouth. They’ll walk off the first cliff they’re told to.

    Reply
    • Kimbo

       /  24th May 2019

      Er, didn’t old people say that about your generation when they protested practically everything? The Vietnam War, apartheid, nuclear testing in the South Pacific, war, feminism, gay rights, abortion, DDT… 😉

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  24th May 2019

        Not that I recall, Kimbo. There were plenty of older people in most of those movements as well as young. It may have been different in the US.

        And this was university level activism, not school children. A lot more analytical.

        Reply
        • Kimbo

           /  24th May 2019

          Was maybe thinking more of the US, including campuses, although I’d suggest NZ Universities and wider counter-culture imitated many of their trends. And as per Allan Bloom’s discussion on the intimidation of activities such as sit-ins and student takeovers in th3 1960s, it seems the modern hard-left movements such as Antifa and Black Lives Matter are nothing new.

          Oh, yes, and protesting obscenity laws, the criminalisation of recreational drugs, compulsory military training, capitalism, Maori rights, the prosecution of Tim Shadbolt and Germaine Greer… 😀

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  25th May 2019

            Hee ! I have an old and fragile OHMS poster here.

            It’s carefully kept away from the light as it’s so fragile. I can’t remember where it came from.

            Noel Coward was terrified that he’d be called to testify in the Lady Chatterley’s Lover trial; he was committed to the cause of not censoring literature on the grounds of obscenity but hated the idea of having to defend such a dreadful book.

            One of the worst jobs in literary history must be that of the poor sod who had to count all the fucks and cunts in LCL. I bet that they just did a few sample pages and multiplied them; who’d check ? I don’t know if they also had to count the number of shits and pisses as well.

            Said Lady C. to Mellors,
            ‘Can you tell me where the well is ?’
            ‘My lady, it’s in the bluebell wood.’
            ‘Pray, take me there if you’d be so good.’

            Reply
  5. Trevors_elbow

     /  24th May 2019

    Demonstrating…all the callowness of youth… no experience no wisdom and lots of gullibility

    Critical thinking us nit on the curriculum based on the news interview clips I heard this afternoon…

    Climate is changing as it always has…. man maybe impacting or not…. the lefties using it to drive a change they want has found another tool to in callow youth to apply more pressure.

    Reply
  6. Griff.

     /  24th May 2019

    yip the normal gibbering from those who dont like the impact of reality on their ideology
    The poor kids are going to grow up in the pile of shite you are leaving behind and they know it .
    What I find amusing it some of you have been pushing the same crap for years and have not yet realized you have lost. No one is listening to science denying cranks anymore. Not one viable political party in NZ shares your delusions.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th May 2019

      The climate will decide who loses, Griff. Not you or political parties. Much water to flow under that bridge yet.

      Reply
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  1. School pupil climate change protests — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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