Theresa May is quitting

Theresa May has finally resigned as British Prime Minister. Missy has details:


Theresa May has quit as PM. This morning she Made a statement from the podium outside No. 10 where she said she would be stepping down as Prime Minister as of 7 June.

This allows for the D-Day commemorations and Trump’s state visit to go ahead without the distraction of a Conservative Party Leadership contest.

Theresa May quits: UK set for new PM by end of July https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-48395905

Nominations to stand as leader will close in the week before 10 June, which gives two weeks for leadership hopefuls to get on the ballot. The Leadership contest is due to begin on 10 June.

Boris Johnson is the current favourite to win, and he has pledged to make Brexit happen at all costs.

Among the others expected to run, or have already indicated they will run are:
Esther McVey
Jeremy Hunt
Sajid Javid
Andrea Leadsom
Michael Gove
Rory Stewart
Dominic Raab
Steve Baker

The expected timetable is as follows:
7 June: PM officially steps down
10 June: leadership race begins. The Parliamentary Part votes on the Leader in a round robin with the lowest scorers dropping out at each round until two are left. The final two will go to the Party Members.

It is expected that the results will be known by 26 July.

It has been confirmed that the chair of the 1922 Committee, Sir Graham Brady, is considering running for leader so he is standing down from the Committee.

Since the announcement by Theresa May three MPs have declared their intent to stand for leader, none are a surprise.

Jeremy Hunt
Boris Johnson
Esther McVey


Britain has had a hopeless leader for months, now they will have virtually no leader for another 2 months.

I have no idea how this will affect the Brexit mess, but it seems very unlikely to sort it out.

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17 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  25th May 2019

    Pete, a small correction to my original post. Technically May has quit as leader of the Conservative Party as of 7 June, so she will continue as PM until a new leader is elected. Parliament is back after the Whitsun Recess on 4 June, I am not sure when the summer recess will begin, but I imagine it will be around the time the new Conservative Leader is elected towards the end of July, so she will have about 6 weeks as a lame duck PM.

    “I have no idea how this will affect the Brexit mess, but it seems very unlikely to sort it out.”

    Brexit was never going to be sorted under May, so there is a better chance of it being sorted with a new leader, especially one who already has a vision of what it should look like.

    The EU response has been quite adamant that there will be no renegotiation and no more extensions, they are already talking of the UK leaving with no deal, however, I caution on taking this as gospel, the EU have had these words before and then given in on an extension, they have previously indicated that if the UK had a new Government they could re-open negotiations, so I see this as the EU trying their usual bullying tactics, but even if the UK leave with no deal the EU will negotiate with the UK for a FTA.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th May 2019

      Hard to imagine a new PM finding it much easier getting another deal through their Parliament. Clearly the political, diplomatic & economic difficulties of exiting the EU were hugely underestimated. The economic implications still seem very unclear. What a mess.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  25th May 2019

        It isn’t the idea of a deal that was the problem, it was specifics in her deal. An amendment to it, if she had taken it back to Brussels and it had been accepted, would have meant the deal passed.

        Most recognise that possibly there would be a period of remaining within many of the EU structures, the problem with May’s deal was around the Northern Ireland Backstop and the lack of an exit from that.

        I think it is a mixed thing on the exiting of the EU, there are many issues that contributed to bringing the UK to this point which I have listed below, but yes it was underestimated.

        1. The EU never really wanted Article 50 or an exit clause, it was put in at the UK’s request to comply with international law, they just didn’t think anyone would leave the EU so they didn’t think about it much.

        2. Cameron and Osborne refused to believe the population would vote to leave, and therefore they wouldn’t let Government departments red team a possible leave vote, or come up with a plan for what the UK would want to leave. An interesting side note on this, I was at a talk last week given by Sir John Key, and he said that he told Cameron prior to the referendum that he should be prepared for a Leave vote, Cameron apparently told him not to be ridiculous and that the people wouldn’t vote to Leave.

        3. The Government couldn’t negotiate. They were too naive and believed the EU would not play hardball. This is admittedly third hand, someone I know got it from a MP who was closely involved, he said that they stupidly went in with what they thought they would get rather than with what they wanted, so instead of negotiating up to the position they wanted they had to compromise up to what the EU were willing to give away.

        4. May had the wrong civil servant in charge of the negotiation. She should have put Crawford Falconer, and experienced negotiator, in charge, instead she chose a mid level civil servant who had no negotiating experience.

        5. May triggered Article 50 too soon. She should never have sent the letter when she did. She should have said to the country that the country was not yet prepared to begin negotiating, and they would be taking some time to ensure they had plans for all possible outcome. She lacked vision.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  25th May 2019

          The real problem was 2 years was un- realistic period.
          Even when Greenland ‘left’ the EU’ it took 3 years , and they were nowhere as complicated as UK nor was the EU as simple as it was in 82,, and of course as an overseas territory of Denmark are still in an association with EU
          https://www.thejournal.ie/readme/opinion-greenlands-exit-from-the-eec-took-years-so-the-brexit-timeline-was-always-unrealistic-4479574-Feb2019/

          The original plan was not to involve parliament so much in approving the details, it was the die hard remainers , hoping to torpedo the whole deal who changed that both by court action and in the House of Lords

          The last laugh will be on the Brussells bureaucrats who will face the biggest bloc of EU ‘skeptic ‘ MPs when europe wide election results are announced tomorrow. Even the Dutch anti EU party is expected to do well of all places.

          Reply
          • Missy

             /  25th May 2019

            Of course two years was unrealistic, but when the EU put the time limit of two years into the treaty they never ever thought anyone would actually want to leave.

            I am aware of what the original plan was, and about the court action. For three years Brexit has been the main topic of conversation here, the main headline in the media, the dominant political issue. I am well versed in what plans have been put forward, what plans have been thwarted, who was behind them, the constitutionally dubious actions of the speaker, all in the name of Brexit.

            The election results aren’t due to be announced until late Sunday / early Monday European time, not tomorrow. It will be interesting to see how the Eurosceptics from other countries did, it is however expected that the Brexit Party will be the largest single national party represented in the European Parliament, however, they are most likely not going to e able to effect much change in Brussels, and will be no more than an annoyance to the EU.

            This article from the Telegraph gives a fair idea of how little the Eurosceptics will be able to influence Brussels.

            https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/05/24/brexit-partys-looming-success-will-expose-eus-contradictions/

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  25th May 2019

              Annoyance? The anti EU parties were strong even after last election in 2014…( Even in France they were 25% of seats)can’t see them being less this time . Maybe another election shock for the status quo

  2. Missy

     /  25th May 2019

    Reply
  3. Missy

     /  25th May 2019

    There has been an interesting conversation this evening on the Conservative Party Leadership, it has been pointed out that many of the previous leaders voted in were not the favourite, that in fact the Conservatives rarely choose the front runner. If this trend continues then that could mean Boris doesn’t become leader.

    So, that leaves the field open for who may be the dark horse may be for the leadership.

    So far the two most likely ‘dark horses’ mentioned are Steve Baker or Esther McVey, however, the most unlikely person to be leader could come through, and that would be May loyalist and Remainer Rory Stewart.

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  25th May 2019

    If the MPs won’t let Boris get to the party members vote will Conservative leavers break away, join Farage and force an election?

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  25th May 2019

      Cant force an election. Parliaments now must run 5 years other than in very narrow circumstances – 2/3 majority ?
      Most of those ‘running’ are doing so for career reasons- their withdrawal from race would be in return for guarantee of cabinet level post or a particular portfolio
      The loathsome Leadsom being one of those – her tax affairs are more dodgy than Trumps, and she is up to her neck with City financiers ( where she used to work)

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  25th May 2019

        If no-one can form a Government the Queen has no option but to dissolve Parliament. Of course the electorate will then punish whoever they blame for that.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  25th May 2019

          There is a government with a majority , the Queen herself doesnt call elections, as she acts on advice of PM

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed-term_Parliaments_Act_2011
          “Section 2 of the Act also provides for two ways in which a general election can be held before the end of this five-year period:[11]

          -If the House of Commons resolves “That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty’s Government” (a motion of no confidence), an early general election is held, unless the House of Commons subsequently resolves “That this House has confidence in Her Majesty’s Government”. This second resolution must be made within fourteen days of the first. This provision recognises that in a hung parliament it might be possible for a new government to be formed, commanding a majority.
          ( Cant see disgruntled Mps doing this twice – they would be deselected from Conservative party and out of a job)

          -If the House of Commons, with the support of two-thirds of its total membership (including vacant seats), resolves “That there shall be an early parliamentary general election”. ( This is what happened in 2017 only 2 years after the 2015 election)

          Reply
      • Missy

         /  25th May 2019

        An election can be forced via a vote of No Confidence, after which both party leaders have the option of trying to form a Government, and as Alan says if they are unable then the Queen is constitutionally bound to dissolve Parliament, thus triggering an election.

        I would hope all of those running are doing so for career reasons, if they aren’t doing it for that then they have no business running for leader.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  25th May 2019

          Queen only acts on advice of existing PM- not of her own accord. They are very proper about these things

          Reply
        • Duker

           /  25th May 2019

          Running for PM should be they believe they have program and ability to lead the country.
          Its absurd to think they want a cabinet job to be traded for when they drop out of the race. That ceratinly was the case when they had the last race, as the main aim was to avoid a party member vote if there were two left.

          Reply
  5. Zedd

     /  25th May 2019

    It is sounding, increasingly like the UK voters are thinking.. ‘it is time for a take two.. on BREXIT’ a second referendum ?

    btw: I feel a bit sorry for Ms May.. I heard she was actually on the ‘Remain’ side, but tasked with; implementing BREXIT ?
    Oh dear… thats politics :/

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  25th May 2019

      They had a ‘second referendum’ the 2017 general election where the two main parties supported Brexit and saw substantial increases in their votes.
      The SNP and Lib dems ( remainers) dropped in votes – theres your referendum right there

      Reply

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