Teachers strike, more to come

After large teacher strikes yesterday the Minister of Education said there was no more money available for teacher pays for now. Teachers have indicated strikes will continue.

RNZ: Teachers vow to strike again if govt doesn’t up its offer

They marched, they sang, and they shut down most of the country’s 2400 state and integrated schools, but it remains to be seen if today’s historic joint strike by primary, secondary and area school teachers has moved the government.

The joint action by nearly 50,000 members of the Educational Institute and the Post Primary Teachers Association was an attempt to persuade the government to expand the$1.2 billion envelope it has imposed on its offers to teachers.

But speaking to striking teachers in Wellington, the Education Minister, Chris Hipkins, stuck to the line he has consistently given – that the government is doing a lot to improve schools but it can’t do everything at once.

That did not go down well with the thousands of teachers gathered in front of the Beehive and Mr Hipkins retreated from the podium on Parliament’s forecourt to boos and chants of “not enough”.

Unless the budget comes up with something unexpected today it looks like teacher strikes will continue.

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19 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  30th May 2019

    how much public support for teachers…that is the…question.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  30th May 2019

      very little…the media however love stories from ‘twentysomething’ teachers about their ‘struggles’
      Funny that when the average age of teachers in in the 50s…opps those are non people in the medias eyes

      Reply
  2. Zedd

     /  30th May 2019

    AGAIN.. the teachers are doing it because they know this Labour-led Govt. ARE listening.. after 3 terms of total neglect from Natl.

    Hipkins has stated this $1.2Billion increase, is more than Natl gave them over 9 loooong years ! :/

    …just sayin’….. 😦

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  30th May 2019

      And the teacher unions arent even affiliated to the labour party and the ‘experienced’ teachers getting $75k for 1200 hrs per year of class facing time. Most other jobs are 1900 hrs desk/shop floor/factory time.

      Reply
      • Zedd

         /  30th May 2019

        The teachers & the union are likely just ‘venting their frustrations/spleen’ after 9 looong years of neglect from Natl.. but as Hipkins said (paraphrased) ‘we cant fix it all, in one term or this budget’

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  30th May 2019

          They’re not just “venting”. Comment made by one of them on 1new last night (from NZEI?) was “There’s more money in the budget”. They are demanding more money because they think they can force this particular government to give it to them.

          1news’s coverage featured a couple of parents & employers making supportive comments but I’m not convinced those comments are representative of the wider community.

          Even one of their parent “supporters” said most parents & businesses were able to make alternative arrangements to cover childcare in various ways – either taking time off work themselves or getting another parent to look after several of their kids for a day – but she wasn’t sure how many parents or businesses would continue to support teachers if /when they strike again because of the disruption it is causing.

          Reply
          • Zedd

             /  30th May 2019

            @Gezza..

            BUT; is anyone seriously thinking.. Natl actually care about teachers (in public schools); more desperate politicking/bluff & bluster, from Kaye & Bridges

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  30th May 2019

              No. Nobody is thinking National would do any more for teachers than they did before. But did the teachers try this on with them? And if not, why are they screwing this government over?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  31st May 2019

              Someone said that the strikes since Labour came back showed that Labour cared for (nurses/teachers/whoever’s out at the moment) and their concerns.

              Sloppy thinking; if they did. there’d be no need for strikes, surely.

  3. Kitty Catkin

     /  30th May 2019

    If they were really concerned about the pupils, they’d be demanding that the money go to them (pupils) as more pay won’t make the teachers’ hours shorter and the class sizes smaller.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  30th May 2019

      meow

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  30th May 2019

      What d’ya reckon? If all those professing the ease of the job and the importance of children and education were really concerned about the pupils, they’d demand the resignations of all the facile motley lot striking at the moment with the insistence, that they be given their places. 😊

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  30th May 2019

        Nobody who’s been a teacher thinks it’s easy, but one must wonder why some people stay in the profession if it’s as bad as they make it out to be.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  30th May 2019

          Seems to be a group in their first few years – who are still learning the ropes- and see their older colleagues on $75k who have it all under control, and a bad case of pay envy. The media seem to focus on solo parents who can’t make ends meet in the first few years…. Hello.?

          Reply
        • duperez

           /  30th May 2019

          I’d heard it said that teaching was a vocation. Apparently that means something different than just ‘going to work’ or ‘having a job.’ Another word was ‘calling.’

          The activity of teaching would seem to be a socialist activity. More so if it is dealing with the growth and learning of the pupil past teaching a specific, narrow, simple skill like banging in a nail.

          If that is the case those with that ‘calling’ are destined instantly to be called ‘losers’ by some. From another perspective those in the trade are determined to be public servants, to do as bidden. Which might mean that those who don’t want to do the job, and haven’t been trained to do the job tell those who do, what to do. 🙃

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  31st May 2019

            A vocation is indeed different to a job, but not all teachers have vocations. Some have always been content to coast along, doing their job and with no ambition to go further; my mother said that it was very difficult to recruit women to positions of responsibility because they didn’t want the extra work and responsibility, and fair enough, too. Their husbands were the main earners; the wives’ money was the jam on the husband’s bread and butter and they didn’t need to earn more.

            Reply
      • Gezza

         /  30th May 2019

        I don’t think it’s the money that’s causing a shortfall in teachers. I think there are probably multiple reasons. Including that many young people these days don’t go looking for a lifetime career in the same occupation. And how many people who post here would fancy a career in front a classroom of today?

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  30th May 2019

          Count me out. But not just now. I left school thinking no way in hell would I ever want to teach kids like us.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  31st May 2019

            School pupils have never been the obedient little angels that some people imagine.

            My mother had one child whose words ‘Damn this reading ! Damn this reading ! Damn this reading !’ were shrieked over and over. This was a lad from a family of doctors and other professionals.

            Reply

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