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For posting on events, news, opinions and anything of interest from around the world.

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23 Comments

  1. Reply
    • Pink David

       /  9th June 2019

      Rory Stewart is the perfect Tory for everyone who will never vote Tory.

      Reply
  2. Blazer

     /  9th June 2019

    the Economist-

    ‘WHEN DONALD TRUMP arrived in the Oval Office he promised to restore America’s might. His method has turned out to be a wholesale weaponisation of economic tools. The world can now see the awesome force that a superpower can project when it is unconstrained by rules or allies. On May 30th the president threatened crippling tariffs on Mexico after a row over migration. Markets reeled, and a Mexican delegation rushed to Washington to sue for peace. A day later preferential trading rules for India were cancelled. Its usually macho government did not put up a fight and promised to preserve “strong ties”. China faces a ratcheting up of tariffs soon, and its tech giant, Huawei, has been severed from its American suppliers. The country’s autocratic leaders are enraged, but on June 2nd they insisted they still seek “dialogue and consultation”. A tighter embargo on Iran, imposed over European objections, is strangling its economy.
    President Trump must view this scene with satisfaction. Nobody takes America for granted any more. Enemies and friends know that it is prepared to unleash an economic arsenal to protect its national interest. America is deploying new tactics—poker-style brinkmanship—and new weapons that exploit its role as the nerve centre of the global economy to block the free flow of goods, data, ideas and money across borders. This pumped-up vision of a 21st-century superpower may be seductive for some. But it could spark a crisis, and it is eroding America’s most valuable asset—its legitimacy.’

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  9th June 2019

      Well, the Economist needs to remember, at worst, the world will only have another four years of Trumpy. He’s done the dirty work past presidents didn’t have the stomach for.

      ”President Trump must view this scene with satisfaction. Nobody takes America for granted any more.”

      Ain’t that the truth.

      All eyes will be on the president that follows Trump. What will he/she do? Keep the gains made by Trump? Or squander them with a return to ”appeasement politics”and ignoring countries who actively work to undermine the US?

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  9th June 2019

        so protectionism is in vogue again…free trade is out the door!

        How fickle this super power is ….does 360 degree turns…if it…suits!

        Trump is laying the foundation for the ‘ugly American’ to become even more of an international pariah.

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  9th June 2019

          “360 degree turns”

          A 360 degree turn has you in the same place you started. No change at all.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  9th June 2019

            you are a real smart guy…

            ‘Protectionism in the United States is protectionist economic policy that erected tariff and other barriers to trade with other nations. This policy was most prevalent in the 19th century.’

            Reply
            • Pink David

               /  9th June 2019

              Blazer, Protectionism was to ensure local businesses get the benefit, much like NZ operated before the 80’s. The EU is entirely built on a basis of protectionism as well.

              Given China is using a mercantile policy, using extensive non-tariff barriers internally, while claiming free trade when it suits, it’s logical for Trump to call there bluff with the tools he has.

            • Blazer

               /  9th June 2019

              ‘Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) have proved to be one of the best ways to open up foreign markets to U.S. exporters. Trade Agreements reduce barriers to U.S. exports, and protect U.S. interests and enhance the rule of law in the FTA partner country. The reduction of trade barriers and the creation of a more stable and transparent trading and investment environment make it easier and cheaper for U.S. companies to export their products and services to trading partner markets.’

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  9th June 2019

        Did the Economist explain what entitles Mexico to ship refugees across it by the hundreds of thousands to stuff into the US? Or China to steal its IP systematically?

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  9th June 2019

          no and it didn’t explain why the U.S had invaded 37 countries since WW2 and appropriated resources and annihilated millions.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  9th June 2019

            I guess being a bunch of gormless Lefties now it didn’t want to say Trump’s methods and principles are far more ethical.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  9th June 2019

              More ethical than what and whose ? What and who could be less ethical ???

            • Duker

               /  9th June 2019

              Wilco ever heard of El Salvador and Nicarauga and US involvement in their internal politics that would make Putin blush.

              Maybe Trump could avoid employing migrants with no rights to work in US or the times his resorts apply to bring in guest workers….you know the clean and wait on rich americans

  3. When Trump yanked back his economic ultimatum late Friday night, he seemed to walk away with a win-win: no new trade war with a major U.S. economic partner, and “strong measures” by Mexico to curb the flow of Central American migrants.

    But critics say Trump avoided a political crisis of his own making – one that could have wreaked havoc on the U.S. economy and sparked a political revolt from within his own party. And it’s not clear how much the agreement with Mexico will really accomplish on illegal immigration, Trump’s signature issue.

    “One of Donald Trump’s signature moves as president is to act as both arsonist and firefighter, taking credit for resolving pseudo-crises that he in fact initiated,” Brendan Nyhan, a public policy professor at the University of Michigan, wrote in a recent post on Medium.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2019/06/08/trumps-deal-over-migrants-mexico-self-made-crisis-critics-say/1391843001/

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  9th June 2019

      Trump is using trade as a tool of foreign policy. A professor of public policy should be vaguely aware of that.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  9th June 2019

      Mexico is a victim of the Democrats’ blocking any and all remedial actions within the USA.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  9th June 2019

        That’s a failure of Trump’s leadership, as he is blocking a path for permanent residency for families already in US under previous dispensations – dreamers etc- going back decades
        There was a majority in both houses that was bi partisan but the Tea party blocked anything in the House that didn’t have a majority of Republicans supporting it, as they would only be be say 30% house Republicans support. Trump encourages this

        Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  9th June 2019

    Liam Dann is running interference for Adrian Orr today. Odd that this happened just a day after I read somewhere he is usually a conduit for RBNZ views.
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12237913

    Reply
    • Blazer.

       /  9th June 2019

      the real question is what sort of oversight is needed regarding banks in NZ.

      We know the banks contention that they can self regulate is an audacious pisstake,that culminated in the GFC.

      Jail errant bankers like Iceland did.Sack the charlatans that have no respect for ethics and the law.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  9th June 2019

        Previously we used to have higher interest rates in NZ compared to Australia because……something to do with NZ being higher risk or something.
        Funny when RBNZ wants to lower the risk , which means those overseas lenders involved in ‘carriage trade ‘ can expect lower interest rates?
        Oh no …more risk higher rates
        Lower the risk and higher rates
        That’s bankers thinking

        Reply

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