Census 2018 – national highlights

Census 2018 data has been released. The process has been a problem, with a quality assessment finding the majority of key data was either very high, high, or moderate quality, but some data is poor or very poor


Key facts

New Zealand’s 34th Census of Population and Dwellings was held on 6 March 2018. We combined data from the census forms with administrative data to create the 2018 Census dataset, which meets Stats NZ’s quality criteria for population structure information.

The census night population count of New Zealand is a count of all people present in New Zealand on a given census night. The census usually resident population count of New Zealand is a count of all people who usually live in and were present in New Zealand on census night. It excludes overseas visitors and New Zealand residents who are temporarily overseas. The following population information is based on the census usually resident population.

Results of the 2018 Census showed:

  • The Māori ethnic group comprised 16.5 percent of the census usually resident population.
  • New Zealand was the most common birthplace, at 72.6 percent. This was followed by England (4.5 percent), the People’s Republic of China (2.9 percent), and India (2.5 percent).
  • The most common languages spoken were English (95.4 percent), te reo Māori (4.0 percent), and Samoan (2.2 percent).
  • More than 9 in 10 households (91.9 percent) in occupied private dwellings had access to a cell or mobile phone, a higher proportion than those with access to the internet at 86.1 percent.

Ethnicity

The percentage of the population who identified themselves as belonging to the Māori ethnic group was 16.5 percent.

There was no change in the top five ethnicities between the 2013 and 2018 Censuses: New Zealand European (64.1 percent), Māori (16.5 percent), Chinese not further defined (nfd) (4.9 percent), Indian nfd (4.7 percent), and Samoan (3.9 percent).

The 2018 Census totals by topic – national highlights tables have national counts of ethnicities at the most detailed level of the ethnicity classification. However, 2018 Census population and dwelling counts has broad groupings of ethnicities (that is, European, Māori, Pacific, Asian, MELAA (Middle Eastern, Latin American, and African), and Other ethnic groups) at various levels of geography.

Birthplace

Of the census usually resident population, 72.6 percent were born in New Zealand. This compares with 74.8 percent in the 2013 Census.

The next most common birthplace was England at 4.5 percent, down from 5.4 percent in 2013.

This was followed by the People’s Republic of China (2.9 percent or 132,906 people) and India (2.5 percent or 117,348 people), both up from 2.2 and 1.7 percent respectively (or 89,121 and 67,176 people) in the 2013 Census.

Languages spoken

Of the top five languages, both te reo Māori and Northern Chinese (including Mandarin) speakers increased slightly since the 2013 Census, from 3.7 to 4.0 percent, and from 1.3 to 2.0 percent respectively.

English was the most common language with which people could hold a conversation about everyday things, with 4,482,135 speakers (95.4 percent of the population).

The next most common languages were:

  • te reo Māori (185,955 people or 4.0 percent)
  • Samoan (101,937 people or 2.2 percent)
  • Northern Chinese (including Mandarin) (95,253 people or 2.0 percent)
  • Hindi (69,471 people or 1.5 percent).

New Zealand Sign Language was used by 22,986 people (or 0.5 percent). In 2013, this was 20,235 people (or 0.5 percent).

Education and training

One in four New Zealanders (24.5 percent) participated in full- or part-time study. Of these, 87.0 percent participated in full-time study.

Of the population, 18.2 percent of adults reported no qualification for their highest qualification, down from 20.9 percent in 2013.

The proportion of adults who had a bachelor’s degree or level 7 qualification for their highest qualification was 14.6 percent, while 5.9 percent had an overseas secondary school qualification.

Housing

The proportion of households in occupied private dwellings who owned or partly owned their homes, and made mortgage payments, was 27.8 percent. An additional 18.8 percent owned or partly owned their homes and did not make mortgage payments.

Of households whose dwelling was not owned or held in a family trust, 31.9 percent made rent payments, while a further 3.4 percent lived in a dwelling rent-free.

Of the households who paid rent, 83.5 percent rented from a private person, trust, or business, and 0.3 percent of households who paid rent rented from an iwi, hapū, or Māori land trust.

Heat pumps were the most common form of heating used in New Zealand homes (47.3 percent), followed by electric heaters (44.1 percent), and wood burners (32.3 percent).

Most households in occupied private dwellings had access to a cell or mobile phone (91.9 percent), and 86.1 percent had access to the internet.

2018 Census totals by topic – national highlights

Microsoft Excel Open XML Spreadsheet, 621 KB

Stats NZ: https://www.stats.govt.nz/information-releases/2018-census-totals-by-topic-national-highlights

Leave a comment

24 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  24th September 2019

    I think we will be in for a shock when the results of the next census are released. My take on things when I walk up the main street is: where are the New Zealanders? Sure location is an important factor, but I’m asking myself the same question in some rural areas I visit.

    Reply
    • The census counts New Zealanders. An increasingly diverse bunch.

      The mix can be different in cities due to students and tourists, in resort areas with tourists and foreign workers, and in rural areas with foreign workers.

      This isn’t unusual, it’s the way of the world. Which in this age isn’t unusual, immigration and worker movement has been happening for millennia. Most of us are very ethnically mixed.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  24th September 2019

        All that is true, Pete. Take Japan. They are in the same boat as us with an ageing population and an economy that needs foreign workers, so they are relaxing immigration laws. But I believe there comes a time when a country needs to protect their national character; not pander to diversity as we are. Japan, in my opinion, will always protect their national character. New Zealand is giving ours away in the name of diversity.

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  24th September 2019

      Just heard Winston on the radio say we have 20,000 overstayers. How, he asks, can this happen in the computer age? How indeed. Hence my comment above about the next census which I’m assuming(?) will be implemented competently.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th September 2019

        We’ve had 20,000 overstayers for decades. It’s a lot to do with their system. Many people for example stay on a few days beyond their visa expiry date & then depart. It’s a something of a rotating roll I gather – or it used to be.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  24th September 2019

          I can’t tell by looking at people if they are New Zealanders or not for the most part. It was obvious in the case of a man who looked and was dressed like an African prince, of course, as most Kiwis don’t look like that, alas.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th September 2019

            If they’re wearing exploding explosive suicide vests, these days, they’re mostly Middle Eastern or Eurasian. 😐

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  24th September 2019

              Or North or Central African, just thinking of Al Shabab & Boko Haram. Best avoided & not invited to weddings, functions or church services.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  24th September 2019

              Very tall, very dark and very handsome in this case, straight out of a film.

    • Gezza

       /  24th September 2019

      where are the New Zealanders? Sure location is an important factor, but I’m asking myself the same question in some rural areas I visit.

      Oz, mainly Sydney & Melbourne, Texas (the gun nuts), Calfornia, Colorado, Vancouver, Toronto, Phuket, Shanghai, Beijing, Guandong, London, Dubai (especially nurses & other medicos, paying off their student loans in double quick time), Amsterdam, mostly, I think.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  24th September 2019

        Yes, our breeding stock. Even if they were home their breeding rate is below our replacement rate. Many immigrants do breed well above their replacement rate. I don’t get how people can’t get their heads around this simple maths equation, and what it means for our future.

        Reply
        • “Many immigrants do breed well above their replacement rate.”

          Is there any evidence of this?

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  24th September 2019

            Yes..I post before on the article re Asian birth rate. The average Muslim birth rate is 2.1..but let’s forget all that. Let’s say I’m wrong. It doesn’t matter because we aren’t replacing ourselves. We are too busy worrying about climate change, what our social media status is, and making sure there’s equal status for sheilas around the boardroom table.

            https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11433861

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  24th September 2019

              Why do you refer to women as sheilas, a dated and sexist term ? You now spell it right, but it’s still inappropriate.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  25th September 2019

              I wonder how it’s possible to tell just by looking at someone whether they were born here or not, especially if they are Pakeha. There have been people of many races here for generations; how can Corky tell if they are immigrants or fifth-generation by looking at them ???

  2. I’m surprised that the same percentage of people speak Te reo and mandarin. i thought mandarin was far more predominant.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  24th September 2019

      Arty..you didn’t take into account Doc Morgans revival rallies.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th September 2019

        😳
        Wtf?

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  24th September 2019

          LOL… I had to put things in terms Arty would understand. The promotion and ‘coolness’ of learning Maori and speaking the language has taken on a religious fervour. It’s very ironic given the language is dying and will eventually become extinct.

          Reply
          • Who on earth is ‘Doc Morgan’ ?

            Do you mean Doc Martens, perchance ?

            What religious revivals are these, and what on earth would one have to do with any given language ?

            Reply
  3. Gezza

     /  24th September 2019

    Two Europeans & an indigen were among the first to complete a Spring Census at Pookden Manor this morning. The population is booming, High percentage of fast food addicts.

    https://streamable.com/rpd5z

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  24th September 2019

      The Old Farm Cottage is a drop in centre for overstayers who come for the social life and enjoy the free meals on on offer.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  24th September 2019

        They are BIRDS, PDTs, feathered songsters, flappy-winged creatures….not human beings….

        Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s