Gang Membership on the rise

Guest  post from Gezza:


Stuff – Patched gang members increase: Opposition says Government soft on crime

Despite police efforts to up the ante on tackling gang-related crime, patched membership has increased.

The Opposition has put the increase in gang affiliation down to the Government taking what it says is a “soft on crime approach” and putting too much effort in reducing the prison population.

The figures supplied to National by Police Minister Stuart Nash, show about 1400 more people have joined a gang since the Government took office in 2017 and National leader Simon Bridges blames a lack of action by the Government.

The latest female extension of the Mongrel Mob, brazen meetings in public places like Te Mata Peak and gang members refusing to hand in illegal firearms was concerning, he said.

The Government’s focus has been on reducing prison numbers at any cost, but it has no plan to reduce crime. An increase in gang membership means an increase in crime in our communities and more victims,” he said.

“It’s no secret. We hate gangs… we are thinking about how we can crack down on gangs,” [Bridges] said.

[Police Minister Stuart] Nash has repeatedly said there was a focus on gangs and organised crime, which had been identified as a priority area in the Coalition Government Agreement. Extra police were being deployed to target organised crime.

Last week, he announced a new batch of graduating constables would be tackling gang-related crime and working to reduce harm from drugs like methamphetamine.
In May, he said a gang focus police unit being set up in Hawke’s Bay would go some way to curb the rise of gang violence in the region.

In April he said police had dealt a major blow to the Comanchero gang with the arrest of senior gang leaders and seizure of nearly $4 million of assets. Police efforts reflected the Government’s commitment to go hard on organised crime, he said…

I must admit I’m with Bridges on this. Current measures to tackle the gangs continually infesting, intimidating & sometimes effectively controlling access to, our communities are tinkering around the edges. The time for society, and Maori society in particular, making excuses for putting up with this blight upon the nation, & all the shocking donestic violence & other negative impacts & social statistics they bring to townships & suburbs, should be over.

What do we do about them? How do we get them socially shunned, & young folk dissuaded from getting sucked into their thuggery & their false & distorted sense of “family” akin, in my view, to that of the Sicilian & American mafiosi?

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68 Comments

  1. NOEL

     /  6th October 2019

    If a Government banned insignia and they all chose to flaunt such laws someone calculated there would not be sufficient police to enforce the law.
    The time to crack down hard was when Muldoon set up a drinking photo op and subsequent pollies have paid lol service ever since.

    Forget about gang on gang voilence. Design stronger laws and victim reparations when innocents are impacted.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  6th October 2019

      I’ve spent a lot of time in Welly hospital over the last five years or so with a couple of health issues of my own needing regular scans, and my two beloved parents in-law getting diagnosed with, & going through the treatments for, terminal illnesses.

      People from one particular ethnic group routinely sit around singly or in groups smoking up large on the seats out front underneath the multiple four foot high signs saying smoking is banned there, but althogh there’s also a smaller-signposted ban on gang insignia being worn inside, curiously – it’s observed. I’ve never seen anyone wearing one there or being hassled by Security to get out or lose the jacket.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  6th October 2019

      A main item on 1news tonite. The reporter said gangs have “become cool again”. But Police Miinister Nash was blaming the mem ership increase on the gangs (especially the Mongrel Mob – now the biggest gang in NZ) making record profits from crime, & in particular the meth trade.

      I think both the reporter & Nash are partly right, but kids aren’t joining gangs just to make record profits for the upper-echelon – or even the middlemen scroats – running the gangs.

      Some filthy rich leaders are reportedly now even posing as “respectable members of society” with their own bankers, accountants, nice homes – the lot.

      At least this time they showed a senior officer somewhere saying: “Police don’t buy the “they’re family” story. They might be looking after their own family, but they’re selling meth to yours!”.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  6th October 2019

        Fkn iPad! Too easy to make bloody typos like typed letters that didn’t insert, & miss them. 😠

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  18th October 2019

        ‘Some filthy rich leaders are reportedly now even posing as “respectable members of society” with their own bankers, accountants, nice homes – the lot. ‘

        A very common condition for successful criminals!!

        Reply
  2. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  6th October 2019

    I taught Gang children (Black Power – South Wellington) and now reside in Mongrel Mob territory (Kaiti, Gisborne…..not very active, currently).

    Sport offered the quickest/ easiest way out of Gang-life for many young boys.
    Regular employment/ decent jobs are needed to keep young men and women away from gangs.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  6th October 2019

      Yes, I guess, but have social (peer) pressures now become so prevalent in some places that the Gang life just looks so macho & cool to adolescents with little education & no incentive to take education & a low-paying job if there is one seriously coming from their gang member or gang affiliate parent(s), is someone organising sports events & teams enuf?

      Reply
      • Maggy Wassilieff

         /  6th October 2019

        Well… Maggy’s Great Solution.. is to introduce a circuit breaker into the lives of young prospects.

        I’m a great believer in taking folks out of their comfort zones…introducing people to new experiences, environments and people.

        So I’m in favour of all young citizens doing time-out, time-away community service/work experience somewhere in NZ away from their usual influences (bit like compulsory military service without the compulsory Military bit).

        Probably some folks would return to a gang life, but I expect others would get a decent glimpse of other possibilities.

        I’d tie in carrots to completing the community work experience… i.e. tertiary grants or cheaper housing loans, etc.

        Reply
        • Geoffrey

           /  6th October 2019

          A hybrid Swiss, Swedish, Israeli concept of national training perhaps? Organisations lending theirselves to the concept might include , shipping, fishing, nursing, police, defence, forestry, farming, DOC…… Could work. My experience of young layabouts being “encouraged” into the Army suggests it would.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  6th October 2019

          I like that Maggy. Good thinking.

          Reply
          • Maggy Wassilieff

             /  6th October 2019

            I see NZ as a more stratified society nowadays than when I was kid in the 50s & 60s… (tho’ as a working class kid from a dysfunctional family, I was aware that NZ was not a classless society back then).

            One thing with doing a national service stint is that folks from reclusive sects (exclusive Brethren, Gloriavale, orthodox Jewish, etc) would be expected to attend; poor kids would mix with middle-class and wealthy kids; country folk from the S.I. would be exposed to our urban, ethnic mix.

            I’d expect all to receive First aid and Emergency training, civics basics, Driving courses, outdoors courses, basic housekeeping-budgeting stuff, basic health cares, childcare, animal care, etc.

            Some places might cater for special needs ( intellectual/physical limitations, young parents.)… but on the whole…each & every NZer between 18-25 years would be expected to do a decent period of National Service.

            Reply
  3. Geoffrey

     /  6th October 2019

    To Gezza. I believe a hospital would be observed as trucial territory by all gangs. There is no gain to patch up and then get into a stouch with a rival gang whilst waiting for medical attention

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  6th October 2019

      Cheers Geoffrey. There’s something in that, I suspect.

      Reply
    • NOEL

       /  6th October 2019

      Geoffrey yah hit the nail on the head.
      Don’t bother with the cost of taking gang on gang violence through the courts, patching them up after a stouch on each other or paying them welfare.
      They’ve opted out of society so let them source all those costs from their own income sources and put draconian penalties when a innocent is involved.

      Police today have good intel today who is in a gang and who is not.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  6th October 2019

        Come on, NOEL. We need to keep it real. You’re heading into Corky-like territory there. There’s no way anyone in the medical profession is going to be stopped from treating gang members or any other violent thug injured in gun, knife or assorted weapon battles, with the possible exception of paramedical staff prevented by common sense and/or the police from entering an active shooter or danger zone. Just not going to happen. .

        Reply
        • NOEL

           /  6th October 2019

          I have a son who unknown by him was crossing the “dark side” when he was seeking an address. End result was a TBI, months of reh and continuing problems.
          Never saw Victim Support in any form nor anything from the gang parents of the radicialised youth who wouldn’t fess up.

          The gang defending lawyer stretched things till the case went out of time.
          Judge said she suspected the one probably scroat involved did it and that was it.

          Sorry if I want to exterminate the lot but hey you raised this issue Geeza what’s your solution.

          Hope yah get mouthy at the hospital and we’ll see how you see things then.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  6th October 2019

            I know exactly what the pricks are like, NOEL. (Forgive me, what’s a TBL.) The last thing I’d do is get mouthy with one of the swine, especially if more of the bloody scroats are hanging around or it looks like he has mates or whanau handy.

            I thought I’d made that clear in my post. If there was a practical way to wipe them out without abandoning rule of law and somebody committing crimes against humanity in the process.I’d have absolutely no objection.They routinely get away with blue bloody murder. – and literal bloody murder.

            And intimidation. And drug dealing. And I’m fed up to the back teeth with their PR spokespeople,/apologists like Phil O’ bloody Reilly and Jarrod Gilbert getting air time any tv news or current affairs reacts to the latest freaking gang outrage.

            The last time I saw Phil O’Reilly interviewed (I think) about the gangds’ reported intention to refuse to hand in their guns because they needed them for defence against other gangs, he started off on his usual soft soap bs lines and when gingerly pressed by the interviewer quick descended into glowering verbal intimidation that soon had the gutless blimmin interviewer leaving it there.

            Gilbert and O’Reilly both, it seems to me, exploit their gang associations to give themselves some profile and celebrity. I wish media would spend more time talking to victims and police experts on gang activities.

            But there MUST be other things that can be done about these damned gang blots on the landscape & the half-wit, ill-educate, anti-social misfits & thugs that join them.

            Cutting off the supply or recruits and countering their macho attractiveness to lost & useless teens who can’t make anything of themselves at a time of their life when it becomes important to BE SOMEBODY seems to me to be the way to go.

            I’m fed up with politicians’ big talk about getting tough on gangs – and then simply saying “Oh – what we mean is we’re going after “organised crime”.

            Your son wasn’t attacked by a bloody organised criminal. Why can’t the fuzz run tv ads, for example, showing the devastation and intimidation and misery these bastards cause, for example: “Do you really want to be one of these people?”

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  6th October 2019

              *any time tv news or current affairs reacts…

            • Gezza

               /  6th October 2019

              Medfical abbreviations
              Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a nondegenerative, noncongenital insult to the brain from an external mechanical force, possibly leading to permanent or temporary impairment of cognitive, physical, and psychosocial functions, with an associated diminished or altered state of consciousness.Jun 27, 2019

              Symptoms: Altered level of consciousness

              I’m sorry for your son’s injury NOEL. I can understand your anger at the bastard who did that. and the system that let him get away with it.

            • Gezza

               /  6th October 2019

              I wonder if I’ve unknowingly had a TIA myself, from the number of blimmin typos I make these days. But it’s probably just madly rushing to post, impatience, & laziness with proof-reading.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  6th October 2019

              If you had, you wouldn’t notice the typos and they wouldn’t make sense.

            • Gezza

               /  6th October 2019

              Drat. That means it’s GOT to just be me madly & impatiently rushing to post & laziness with proof-reading. 😟 🔫

              Look, don’t say anything more about it & maybe nobody will even notice? 🆗

            • ALL RIGHT !!!!!

              I WON’T SAY ANYTHING ABOUT THE TYPOS AND I WON’T DRAW ATTENTION TO THEM.

            • Gezza

               /  6th October 2019

              Story. 👍🏼

            • Blazer

               /  18th October 2019

              the question is…why do youth find joining gangs an attractive option?
              The answer will be found in the hopelessness of deprivation and poverty that has accelerated since the 80’s .
              Bombarded with messages about the trappings of ‘success’ ,the only road for some, is the security of gang affiliation.

            • Gezza

               /  18th October 2019

              @ Blazer

              The loss of all the low skill, low education seasonal but well-paid local small freezing works & e.g. small cheese factory jobs may have been the case (now) 3 generations ago, but the problem these days is multi-generational shit parenting, multiple partners, fatherless boys, a basic lifestyle funded by multiple benefits, lack of any parental commitment to their children’s education, & not enuf of these parents or grabdparents or other hapu members wanting to change these kids lives for the better by getting them out of gangs & stopping them joining them.

            • Blazer

               /  18th October 2019

              @Gezza.The reality for the downtrodden is mere existence is a battle.Benefits and accommodation supplements are always barely adequate for people to survive on.
              The rapacious FIRE sector, that has expanded at the expense of any productive enterprise has lead to a rentier society,peonage where having somewhere to live,own,rent is impossible for many,even the aspirational.
              The 9 years of neglect saw a reduction in state housing and remarkably unemployment is quite low now.
              High immigration numbers to keep wages down and maintain profits,puts more stress on housing availability and transport infrastructure.
              Blaming the parents is the default excuse trotted out by the very politicians that have exacerbated the problems.
              Al is closer to the truth=a stake in society is very important.

            • Gezza

               /  18th October 2019

              @ Blazer

              Thanks for that, one of the best-explained replies I’ve had from you.

              I actually agree with that analysis & summary.

              Except that I am not so much blaming the parents as identifying where a central problem now lies. The only way out of the gangs is having something better to do with their lives, & the key to that is good jobs, & the key to those is good education & good behaviour & consequent solid self-esteem – because they know they have status & value; they don’t have to get it by being someone to be feared, by joining a gang.

              That cycle has to be broken. The days of lots of jobs in small freezing works are likely gone forever. Most of these prospects are young Maori tamariki, mostly boys, some girls – increasingly more, it seems.

              Most pakeha kids tend to be more mobile, feeling less pressure to stay where they were born. They go where the jobs are. So do some Maori – but they up stakes & they go to Aussie, where several have claimed they did it to make a decent life & get away from waster gang whanau who were dragging them down.

              Whanau, whakapapa, turangawaewae – these are still important to very many Maori, so they stay living where the whanau has always lived. So we need more job creation in the regions. This is why I like the Regional Development policy (except that I fear it is shambolic, poorly scrutinised, & will see pork barrel money wasted – thrown at short-term projects that don’t produce enuf sustainable, lasting jobs).

              Maori need more housing. So where are the local Maori tradies to build them? The carpenters, the hammer hands, the electricians, plumbers, drainlayers, digger drivers. (One of Possums boys bought a digger years ago; he worked hard, all the hours he could. He made a bloody fortune & he’s sitting pretty now, still got his head screwed on right.)

              A while back tv1 showed some young offenders -mostly gang prospects – who’d been offered training and jobs plastering, decorating, assembling timber framing, various types of semi-skilled jobs. Their employer was thrilled with their work ethic & work quality. He took a pastoral interest in their well-being. Those interviewed were loving the work, commenting on how they enjoyed getting up & having something to do, & how good it felt to have skills they can make a good living with.

              We need more of this, & I’d like to see more Maori entrepreneurs starting up businesses because they have the skills & education to put them to use in their own rohe. I want to see them supported, by govt & whanau, to do this.

              But it has to start, I think, with education, & a commitment to it.

              It’s not enough to just bemoan what’s been wrong. Fixing all that requires political change, but just sitting on your arse & waiting for it won’t bring it about. To get a stake in the economy by buying a house is a great idea. So building your own or buying a basic one & finishing it yourself is one good idea.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  6th October 2019

    I’ve never seen it studied or commented on but I suspect property ownership is a major factor in securing a life outside gangs.

    That so many are locked out of it is an indictment of our social structure and its constraints, including cultures and ideologies that ostensibly devalue it.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  6th October 2019

      Not necessarily – in fact maybe not at all. I know several Maori living in state house (because hey, that’s what you do) happil y holding down good, full-time jobs, married – or at least in stable long-term partnerships, with their kids doing well at school, with their parents’ encouragement.

      Ma’s currently entitled to daily home help (minimal – about 30 minutes if that some days) and several of her carers are Maori. The one she sees the most has a husband in stable employment as a semi-skilled factory hand (sheet metal worker) and the pair of them, tho they live in Porirua send their eldest son all the way in to St Patrick’s school in Wellington because his father went there and considers it gave him a good moral and practical education.

      Reply
  5. duperez

     /  6th October 2019

    Cracking down hard is the quick fix, easy solution. Well easy to say.

    Gangs are a societal issue but naturally, given the way we operate, it is more a political one than anything else. Not political in the sense that the social, economic and historical conditions and such factors which are the result of the politics of the time manifesting themselves in the behaviour of the citizens, but political in the sense there’s an election coming up.

    Sure we need to take gang patches, chuck members in jail for the rest of their lives, destroy gangs. But we also need politicians like Simon Bridges to talk about the social conditions which sees the presence of (what he’s saying is) the festering sore of gangs in 2019. His party’s been in power more than half the time since 1940. Is that their legacy?

    The discussion is not about causes and effect or about something meaningful and progressive. Well I suppose it is about something meaningful, National being elected.

    “The Opposition has put the increase in gang affiliation down to the Government taking what it says is a soft on crime approach.”

    No doubt Bridges appeal will hit the right spots here and there but his trite approach being seen as The Answer would suggest that there are more residents than one in Simpleton.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  6th October 2019

      As I remember it, gang crime dropped a few years ago…National were in then.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  6th October 2019

        Yes, it dropped quite a lot (gang violent crime in particular) according to a mid 2018 report.

        2017 had the lowest murder rate for 40 years; 35. It’s hideous that one apology for a man will probably have doubled this year’s total.

        Reply
      • Duker

         /  6th October 2019

        gang crime dropped ?
        Based on what, I did a quick look back at Police Crime stats , the word ‘gang’ isnt mentioned… but you are an ‘expert’ of course

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  6th October 2019

          Bullshit. I have never claimed to be an expert; don’t arrogantly put words in my mouth.

          I googled something like ‘NZ gang crime rate dropped.’

          To you, perhaps, being able to use Google may make someone an expert. But it doesn’t really.

          Reply
  6. Kitty Catkin

     /  6th October 2019

    I was surprised to discover that a house down my road has Mongel Mob people living there. It’s a nice house and they look after it well; they seem quiet and are pleasant enough in the exchanges I have had with them. I had been talking to one for a few minutes before I noticed that he had a t-shirt with the insignia on it; but one would never have guessed otherwise. He was a nice, well-spoken man like anyone else.

    If only they were all like that !!! I saw two of the men walking with their children; the children were nicely dressed and well-behaved..

    They are not at all (from what I have seen) what one would expect the Mob to be like. Thank goodness. I can’t pretend that I would choose to have a gang in the same road, of course.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  6th October 2019

      Why on earth do four PDT losers take exception to the fact that MMM members live down my road ? Pathetic !

      Reply
    • patupaiarehe

       /  6th October 2019

      Of course they look after it well & behave themselves Kitty. The last thing they want is to draw the attention of the law to the meth lab in their basement 😉

      Reply
    • Alloytoo

       /  7th October 2019

      Having a gang house in your street is a bit like an immunisation. They won’t soil their own patch and the non affiliated crims are too scared to do so.

      Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  11th October 2019

    Right on cue, the PR crew for the gangs gets into high gear to try & muddy the waters & tell us that actually the gangs are really saints & victims.

    If you really want to stop bashing the kids & the missus, intimidating the neighbours & the community, using & selling drugs, threatening or stoushing with rival gangs, knocking over the local dairy, or getting some simple-minded prospect to do it for you – dump the patch & get out of the gang.

    Then maybe you can be taken seriously, instead of expecting us to sift thru this BS!

    Reply
  8. Blazer

     /  15th October 2019

    a lot of comments and hardly a mention about Australia sending back 1200 gangsters.

    @Maggie the whole problem has exploded since the Reagan/Thatcher,Rogernomics ethos from the 80’s =greed is good.
    How can we dissuade Uni graduates from joining the parasitical FIRE economy that produces nothing of value and rinses out ordinary people?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  15th October 2019

      The first thing might be to work out how to persuade them to get their heads out of their smartphones & get interested in politics. The next thing will be for them to work out what political party or international movemrnt they want to support that looks likely to be able to change things for the better. I’m not confident this will happen anytime soon. The environment they are growing up in seems tailor-made to make more insular & self-absorbed than Thatcherites & Reaganites & their followers.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  15th October 2019

        Well banking reform is the lynchpin imo.As things stand the bankers own the media,politicians and the..narrative.The Norwegian economist at Davos was right…millionaire media commentators(NZ think Hosking)relay the propaganda of..billionaire owners.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  15th October 2019

          Yes, I agree. It is. A further thing that needs addressing urgently is that the US (& thus the execrable Trump) is now effectively in control of the global financial system & can wage crippling economic war on anybody, or any country that it wants to. That needs to change, urgently.

          Reply
        • Geoffrey

           /  15th October 2019

          I am inclined to think that Hoskings is a breath of fresh air amidst the cloying pandering to the appeasing, power at any cost, brigade that has populated our parliament for the past few decades. We would be the poorer for it if we were to lose such non pc commentators.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  15th October 2019

            Clearly you have only been absorbing Hoskings partisan drivel for just over 2 years.

            Reply
  9. Geoffrey

     /  15th October 2019

    Not sure that I indicated what I do or do not absorb.. but, I do prefer some balance in the available commentary.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  15th October 2019

      Hosking described as ‘a breath of fresh air’ kinda gives you..away.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th October 2019

        Must admit, “a blast of hot air” would often fit the bill better, bit he’s sometimes right on the button, depending on the issue. It’s not always a right wing conservative rant from him on every topic.

        Reply

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