Open Forum – 28 October

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132 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  29th October 2019

    Stuff.co reporters’ combined Report Card for Ardern, & Winston’s coalition government after 2 loooong years (😉) :

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/116855014/two-years-in-how-is-pm-jacinda-arderns-government-doing

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th October 2019

      They might have mentioned, but didn’t, that Waikato University’s new building, which is duplicating existing ones and has nothing to do with anything academic will cost as much as 600+ houses (decent sized prefabs, three bedroom) would have.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  29th October 2019

        $55,000,000 for a new ‘pa’ and ‘hub’, when there are a marae and a large ‘hub’ there already.

        Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  29th October 2019

    Hosking on the Harry & Meghan documentary shown on TV1 last night.

    For all his trials and tribulations, you can’t fault [Prince Charles] on service, which is why his other headline this past week has been over his fury at his two sons who appear not just to have fallen out, but to have dragged the good name of the royal household into disrepute.

    Harry and Meghan’s simpering expose shows, tragically, an example of how generationally we have sunk to a new low.

    Attributes like resilience, sacrifice and a stoic outlook have been replaced by complaint, superficiality and a wafer-thin ability to weather life. The only advantage Harry has, is he’s not actually that important.

    https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/mike-hosking-breakfast/opinion/mike-hosking-harry-and-meghans-simpering-new-low/

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  29th October 2019

      Mikey is right..us baby boomers are the last generation with any kaha. But even we are going soft as we lose ourselves in this imaginary world of the internet.

      Talking of Mikey, I see he now can’t rattle Jacinda like he used to. She has either grown into the job, or is being coached by Aunty. Probably both.

      Good riddance next year can’t come soon enough.😒

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  29th October 2019

        Baby boomers are POST WWII, so you can’t really claim to be one if you’re as old as other things you say make you appear to be.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  29th October 2019

          Mike Hosking is hardly the same generation as the Sussexes; he’s old enough to be Prince Harry’s father.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  29th October 2019

            He’s basing his information about Prince Charles on the Daily Mail and The Sun. The Sun has a few words in quote marks to make it look as if Prince Charles said them and says that ‘Royal sources’ told them this and that. The Sun is hardly the most reliable or reputable publication, and nor is the Daily Mail. It seems that Prince Charles has not, in fact, commented on the situation.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  29th October 2019

              PDTs, my poor dears, if anything’s said to be from ‘a royal source’, ‘a source close to the Palace’ or ‘a friend of (royal person)’, it’s a giveaway that the paper has made the story up or used guesswork. How sweetly trusting some people are.I hate to be the one who breaks the news to you that just because something’s in the paper, this doesn’t mean that it’s true.

      • Gezza

         /  29th October 2019

        Talking of Mikey, I see he now can’t rattle Jacinda like he used to. She has either grown into the job, or is being coached by Aunty. Probably both. Good riddance next year can’t come soon enough.😒

        As long as Simon’s still in the National leader’s chair, she’s still got a good chance of getting back into government, Corky. NZF can still count on promising voters stuff we know Winston might actually be able to deliver if he has the whip hand over coalition government policy, & Jacinda is still probably going to soak up the young sheila’s votes.

        National will need all the votes it can get.

        Reply
  3. Corky

     /  29th October 2019

    I was talking to a young person from Gisborne who said her street had started a petition to have a cell phone tower removed because trees were dying( good luck with that). YouTube seems to be full of claims and counter claims regarding this, especially regarding the Danish study by two girls who showed spouts dying near a computer router.

    http://gisborneherald.co.nz/opinion/4266952-135/consultation-over-cell-towers-a-must

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th October 2019

      That’s not Gisborne; it’s California.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  29th October 2019

        I hope that the young person isn’t one of those you were talking to whose world revolves ‘literally’ around their phones.

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  29th October 2019

      This clip also isn’t from Gisborne. I think going by the voice, it’s from Britain. The demarcation between healthy bark and diseased bark is quite evident. I have seen many, many trees in my lifetime but never anything like that. Of course there is no scientific proof of cause and effect. But evidence across the world is mounting. Nothing will be done because too much money has been invested on infrastructure and anticipated 5G technology. Much better just to let people die because of inconclusive evidence and reiterate there is no cause for concern.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  29th October 2019

        Only time will tell. But it appears there is a lot of ongoing research into this issue:
        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_radiation_and_health

        There are lots of reasons trees can get sick & die. Several have done on my stream bsnk & there’s no evident cause.

        So a question that occurs to me is how many other trees equally near cellphone towers have these folk also documented & are they all dying? If they aren’t – why aren’t they?

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  30th October 2019

        Oh, boy Apple caught lying:

        Quote: From The Chicago Tribune.

        We tested popular cellphones for radiofrequency radiation. Now the FCC is investigating.

        ”This test, which was paid for by the Tribune and conducted according to federal guidelines at an accredited lab, produced a surprising result: Radiofrequency radiation exposure from the iPhone 7 — one of the most popular smartphones ever sold — measured over the legal safety limit and more than double what Apple reported to federal regulators from its own testing.”

        https://www.chicagotribune.com/investigations/ct-cell-phone-radiation-testing-20190821-72qgu4nzlfda5kyuhteiieh4da-story.html

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  30th October 2019

          Apple lying is not the real problem. This is:

          After reviewing the lab reports from the Tribune’s tests, the Federal Communications Commission said it would take the rare step of conducting its own testing over the next couple of months.

          The same thing has happened with the Boeing 737 Max & the FAA.

          And also here, with the Pike River Mine & the Department of Labour.

          Chronic underfunding of regulatory bodies & departments via neoliberal policies & the capture of governments by Big Business has led to agencies losing in-house expertise & independence & outsourcing their own testing & inspection functions to untrustworthy Companies & Corporates. Then accepting their statements that all is well at face value.

          Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  29th October 2019

    Phil in the shit again?

    Minister of Transport Phil Twyford has said repeatedly that the former board of the New Zealand Transport Agency – with which he had a fractious relationship – did not wish to be reappointed and that the replacement of all but one of the board members last month was due to the board’s term ending.

    But now sources have confirmed to Stuff that this was in fact not the case and that some board members did ask to be reappointed, raising questions over whether Twyford misled Parliament.

    Last week, Twyford was asked in Parliament by National Party Transport spokesman Chris Bishop whether he would “stand by his statement that no one on the New Zealand Transport Agency board asked to stay on?”

    Twyford responded, “Yes, I do”. In response to questions from Stuff, Twyford has now changed his story.

    Leaked letters from the former NZTA board show board members’ frustration that Twyford appeared to blame the lack of progress for light rail on the NZTA. The board alleges that it was Twyford’s indecision that delayed the project.

    Altho
    Sir Brian Roche, the current chair of NZTA and the only member of the old board still at NZTA, went in to bat for the minister last week, saying the Agency “dropped the ball”.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/116986363/phil-twyford-repeatedly-forgot-key-nzta-job-offer-until-he-couldnt

    He’s a dropkick. How in god’s name does he even get elected?

    Reply
  5. Corky

     /  30th October 2019

    I recently decided to increase my reading speed. At the moment I read only 50 words above the average reader. Most speed reading courses are worthless as they only increase speed without comprehension, and any skills learnt seem to fade with time and lack of reading exercises. I have after much searching finally found a book the covers speed reading from a completely different angle to standard courses. In this book, some stats were provided. While germane to America, I believe similar would apply here. In fact, some stats may be worse given our huge underclass:

    1- 58% of the US population never reads another book after high school.
    2- 42% of college students never read another book after college.
    3-80%of US families did not buy or read a book last year.
    4-70% of US adults have not been in a bookstore during the last years 5-57%of new books are not read to completion.
    6- Most readers do not get past page18 in a book they have purchased

    Sport is the opium of the masses? Hell no, the internet is. Surely we are entering a new dark age where ignorance isn’t the problem – it will be our inability to process the screeds of information now available to man that will sink us.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  30th October 2019

      I dunno. That’s always been the problem really. Nobody has ever been able to read all the books that were written and folk have been skimming newspaper articles without reading everything for centuries.

      Seems to me that the problems most often commented on re the internet isn’t that there’s too much information, it’s that

      1. there’s too much conflicting and fake information &
      2. people gravitate towards reading and believing only information that supports their views and prejudices without checking its veracity or alternative viewpoints.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  30th October 2019

      And there’s a further problem for the future that you’ve commented on yourself before – that many of the younger generation are increasingly becoming absorbed with egocentric social media fluff to the exclusion of reading anything worthwhile – and developing short attention spans as social media encourages looking at lots of stuff that’s flashy and brief – they find anything in-depth a chore they can’t be bothered with.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  30th October 2019

        I suspect far too many are over-educated and under-extended. Give me a curious and tenacious individual ahead of a bored and complacent one every time.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  30th October 2019

          Did we have to talk to and work with older, more worldly wise adults more, as we moved into workforces? Where, today, more & more young people continue to talk to – & even often work with – mainly each other – via social media?

          Reply
          • Gerrit

             /  30th October 2019

            When I visit the lunch rooms of my customers to make a coffee, the first thing one notices is how quiet it is at smoko time. Everyone (not just the young) is on their phones checking whatever.

            No dialog, no chatter, no socialising of any kind.

            Smoko’s were social events, not anymore.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  30th October 2019

              Yep. Even see this sort of thing with groups of teenagers walking along our street, all heads down looking at their mobiles, not chatting to each other. Quite weird, but it does make me smile. I also keep a close eye on them in case any one of them steps out onto the road, eyes down. It happens. 😌 🚙 😮 ‼️

              Just 5 minutes ago had a good experience of the benefits of mobile phones & internet technology, tho, Gerrit. I’ve got elderly Chinese neighbours. They speak no English. Their son comes round & handles any complex matters, correspondence etc. We smile & wave, they’re a pleasant couple.

              There are men up on their part of our townhouse’s shared 2nd story roof. I asked him what they were doing but it was obvious he doesn’t know enough English words to even explain that. But he whipped out his phone, held up his finger, pulled up an app, spoke into it & after a few seconds an automated voice explained he needed a translator, I should speak, it would translate – & we were able to have a basic conversation that way.

              Great fun – lots of “ah – yes”, thumbs ups & smiles from both of us. They’re fixing a skylighted section of his roof – it’s leaking.

            • Gezza

               /  30th October 2019

              I’ll just add – because this translator app ‘Steve’ was using is an automated one, it’s like using Google Translate – you get some strange & amusing translations. At one point early on he spoke into phone, held it out to me while it beavered away in the background for a few seconds, & it came out with: “I use this thing to talk to a woman”. o_O

    • Those are shocking stats, Corky, and do little to improve my opinion of the average American. Sadly, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the stats in NZ are similar or worse.

      But I don’t buy into Alan’s suspicion that “far too many are over-educated and under-extended”. I’ve encountered plenty of “bored and complacent” people from all sorts of backgrounds and educated levels.

      For me, the issue of social media spoon-feeding “the masses” with superficial easily-digested pap is the greater concern – ask teens the object of social media, and they’ll all tell you the same thing: to get “likes.”

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  30th October 2019

        Unfortunately this is paywalled:
        https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2019/10/29/britain-has-millions-graduates-has-economy-got-little-show/

        Picture is similar to here though: insufficient trade skills, lower rewards and opportunities for uni grads. Low productivity gains in past decade.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  30th October 2019

          Productive enterprise has suffered because of the explosion in the FIRE sector…financial services ,the only game in town.
          A debt slave economy built on private money creation=the never ending magic show of unpayable…debt.

          Reply
      • It’s all right, Ishmael; they are an urban myth, discredited, debunked and based on nothing as even the person who originally repeated them has said.

        One should never, ever, only look at one site on Google for this sort of stat. If it sounds too bizarre to be true…it usually is.

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  31st October 2019

        Kitty is right, Ishmael. Always check many Google sites. Or do what I do and look for someone quoting an authoritative source…like the American Bureau of Labor Statistics. That is what I have done in comments above. Failure to quote an authoritative source can mean you live in a bubble of your own bs. Unfortunately Kitty has a propensity towards that intellectual failing.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  31st October 2019

          Oops- I meant comment below.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  31st October 2019

          You didn’t get that 58%/42%/70% etc one from the Labour Statistics.

          It’s the first one up on Google. Scrolling down will reveal that it’s been discredited and debunked and is based upon nothing.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  31st October 2019

          You quoted no source for your original stats about reading. They were based upon a 2003 ‘survey’, repeated in 2011 and now debunked with even the person who put them out in 2011 saying that there is no evidence to back them up.

          Always check stats that sound as dodgy as those do.

          I could have quoted many sources to prove that these are wrong. I didn’t because it seemed unnecessary. Stats like that are most unlikely to be accurate.

          Reply
    • Corky

       /  30th October 2019

      Clarifications to my above post:

      *50 words per minute above the average reader.
      *70% of US adults have not been in a bookstore during the last 5 years.
      *57%of new books are not read to completion.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  30th October 2019

        Where did those stats come from ? The usual ones show that over 70% have read books in the last year and that publishing has risen, especially of non-fiction.

        Reply
        • The average speed is 200-250 words per minute.

          My score on a test was 1396 wpm.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  31st October 2019

            The supposed reading stats are based upon nothing. They have been debunked and discredited. Even the person (someone Brewer) who put them out in the first place has said that they were based on nothing and can’t be backed up, and asked that they not be repeated.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  31st October 2019

              In other words, the supposed survey is a total lie.

      • Corky

         /  31st October 2019

        More clarification regards reading:

        Quote:

        ”The share of Americans who read for pleasure on a given day has fallen by more than 30 percent since 2004, according to the latest American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.”

        Obviously the less people read…the more their comments are based on ignorance. It’s incumbent on readers to educate the ignorant, if society is to continue functioning.

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/06/29/leisure-reading-in-the-u-s-is-at-an-all-time-low/

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  31st October 2019

          “Obviously the less people read…the more their comments are based on ignorance.”

          Just a caution that that isn’t necessarily true. It depends on what people are reading. If someone is reading a lot of bs or fake news, for example, it can make them very ignorant whilst thinking they are exactly the opposite & extremely well informed.

          Before I buy into any claims that seem unusual I like to check whether they’ve been debunked first, then explore both arguments further if I’m interested enuf to do so.

          I’ve taken this approach ever since getting drawn down multiple time-wasting rabbit holes with 911 and Sandy Hook conspiracies. Often conspirophiles like to focus on tiny matters that are simply not known or not explicable & exclude the fact that the matter they’re fixated on is already known to be inexplicable, but not particularly important or not actually germane in the overall scheme of things.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  31st October 2019

            There is a new book out on how the late Princess of Wales was murdered: I haven’t read it, so don’t know who has been selected as the murderer/s.

            If one believed what has been written about this tragic accident, one would believe that the crash was somehow engineered. How the murderer/s managed to interfere with the seatbelts, make the driver drunk. organise a chase (if the paparazzi hadn’t dropped back by then and had been directly involved, they would have been facing hefty sentences, something that the conspiracy theorists ignore), make the driver speed and crash in a way that would kill the car’s occupants is never explained.

            Reply
          • Corky

             /  31st October 2019

            ”Before I buy into any claims that seem unusual I like to check whether they’ve been debunked first, then explore both arguments further if I’m interested enuf to do so.”

            That’s where we depart on methodology. I take every conspiracy/claim at face value and consider it true. I then work backward by taking things apart slowly and checking. I’m not saying my way is better, but it works for me. It also stops me ( initially) getting caught up in sceptical debunking which is often as skewered as conspiracy nutters material…especially from professional sceptics whom I consider *sometimes* as nutty as conspiracy nutters.

            If I had listened to debunkers straight off I would never have investigated the Thompson MMR claim: Rosewell or Homeopathy.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st November 2019

              I was under the impression that you thought that the plastic aliens at Roswell were real, as was the claim that a president met aliens when he was supposedly at the dentist; your reaction when people questioned these stories indicated that you were furious at them being doubted.

              I see little point in taking sightings of aliens whose photos show figures made of vinyl with obvious seams as the truth.

  6. Corky

     /  30th October 2019

    Yes, not good.

    Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  30th October 2019

    National now seriously positioning itself for the election:

    “The National Party has signalled a crackdown on welfare alongside longer hospital stays for new mothers if elected next year. The crackdown could include a time-limit on the dole for under 25-year-olds and a sanction for parents on benefits who don’t immunise their children

    In general, the policies point towards a tougher more punitive stance on beneficiaries and a return to the social investment approach – which aimed to reduce the number of New Zealanders relying on social services and the overall costs for taxpayers by using big data to focus early interventions.

    Before the document was released, National revealed its policy to stop gang members and “associates” of gangs receiving income support unless they could prove their other income and assets came from legitimate sources.

    This tough-on-beneficiary stance is present in several policies – both proposed and floated.

    The sanction on sole mothers who don’t name the father of their child, which Labour abolished, would return.

    Under-25s are a particular focus. The party is keen to take more control of the money paid to beneficiaries aged under 20 with a “money management” system that would pay their rent and other costs directly from their dole, and would extend this to all under-25s who don’t meet certain obligations.

    The party would reintroduce targets to reduce the number of children in benefit-dependent homes.

    The party’s social services discussion document, released today, includes a mixture of concrete policies it wants to enact if elected next year as well as proposals it wants feedback on.

    FOCUS ON FIRST 1000 DAYS
    The raft of proposals includes
    – measures to increase Government intervention in the first 1000 days of a baby’s life.
    – increasing postnatal care to three days of fully-funded care in a facility of the mother’s choice and wants to split parental leave between parents and let them take it together.
    – reintroducing a target that would see 90 per cent of pregnant women registered with a Lead Maternity Carer (LMC) in their first trimester.
    – increasing the number of home visits to new parents from Well Child Tamariki Ora
    – intensive home visiting programmes to all mums under the age of 18 and some under the age of 20.
    – support young mothers to improve their education, by introducing minimum standards for antenatal and postnatal education for parents and providing intensive wraparound services for parents under 20, so they could achieve NCEA Level 2.
    – ensure appropriate support was available for foster carers, and it would also look at making emergency income support available for grandparent caregivers, he said.

    STATE HOUSING REFORM
    – re-introducing tenancy reviews for public housing tenants and evictions for anti-social behaviour.
    – reviewing the role of Housing NZ with a view of possibly separating out its house-building and landlord roles. (National Social Housing spokesman Simon O’Connor said the Government was overly-obsessed with KiwiBuild at the cost of public housing.)

    National has also signalled some interest in rent-to-buy schemes to encourage higher home ownership, something the Government is currently developing as a new arm of the struggling KiwiBuild programme.”

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/117017482/national-promises-welfare-crackdown-and-return-to-social-investment-if-elected

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  30th October 2019

      typical Natz….bash the beneficiaries and take the ‘tough’ law and order approach to deflect the real malaise in society….self entitled,parasites,like themselves.
      New ‘star’ Luxon a perfect example with his ongoing golden parachute.Ludicrous.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  30th October 2019

        ”Typical Natz….bash the beneficiaries and take the ‘ to deflect the real malaise in society….self entitled,parasites,like themselves.”

        Show me where the bashing of Beanies takes place? Why can’t the taxpayer demand accountability for how their hard earn’t dollar is spent?

        ”A tough law and order approach?” Surely you jest.

        Blazer, you are perennially angry like Parti and Joe Perry. I’m down ticking you for inconsiderate comments.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  30th October 2019

          National have no worthwhile policies,that’s the reality.
          Same shit,different election.
          Plumbed new depths in black ops and continue the dog whistle beat ups that serve them so well.
          Left wing need to take the gloves off and highlight the Natz craven misdemeanours,start with their scandalous fundraising practices and M.P appointments.
          Better find a sinecure for JLR ,fast ,before he blows the lid off their chicanery.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  30th October 2019

            ”National have no worthwhile policies,that’s the reality.
            Same shit,different election.”

            Yes, finally someone who gets it. The same goes for Labour. That’s why I don’t vote. It’s a waste of time and effort. Tears run down my cheeks when I watch fools lining up to vote😂. They think they are making a difference. They aren’t.

            Like you say – same shit, different election.

            You and I can be best friends if you can just get your mind around the fact Labour and the Left are no better.

            Whatya say, buddy😍?

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  30th October 2019

            Imagine working for MSD, if National scrapes in despite Bridges, if he’s still their leader.

            Wonder what their staff turnover’s like. It must be like experiencing bouts of schizophrenia for their front line workers & call centre staff – trying to get their heads around the alternating realities as the organisation’s culture lurches from one extreme to the other:

            * Tell clients as little as possible about all their possible entitlements, be as hard on them as possible, give them the bare minimum that you can’t avoid giving them – then

            * Tell them everything they may be entitled to, help them apply for and access these entitlements, give them everything they are actually entitled to – then

            * Tell them as little as possible about all their possible entitlements, be as hard on them as you can, give them the bare minimum that you can’t avoid giving them.

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  30th October 2019

            The cops have had more than enuf time to establish whether or not that National donation fiddle JLR cooperated in arranging is illegal & commence a prosecution if so, imo, Blazer.

            That this hasn’t happened suggests to me that it either was technically within the law, or that it’s been discussed with the Police Minister & been shelved – lest it starts a donations war that reveals out some legal problems with certain Labour Party donations.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  31st October 2019

              Unless JLR is as stupid as he looks…he should have kept some ‘revelations’ in reserve as bargaining chips as the next election gets closer.

    • Corky

       /  30th October 2019

      The vaccination thing may cause a stink. If the government is going down that track, I believe forcing people to succumb to vaccinations given *SOME* of the benefits and proofs are plain quack science in my opinion, then it should be incumbent on the government to accept injury liability in the case of vaccine harm. Why isn’t the government forcing women on the DPB to have compulsory birth control first. Shouldn’t that be the first port of call?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  30th October 2019

        There will be greater public support for the vaccination idea than opposition to it, given the worlwide measles outbreaks and the well documented greater incidences of harm caused by those conned by the antivaxxers autism scam – most commonly believed by dense Americans.

        While superficially attractive, how do you envisage a regime requiring women on the DPB to have compulsory birth control being put into effect & monitored?

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  30th October 2019

          ”While superficially attractive, how do you envisage a regime requiring women on the DPB to have compulsory birth control being put into effect & monitored.”

          Quite easily..3 monthly visits to the doctor. Failure to turn up..and the benefit is cut.

          I usually don’t go deeply into vaccination issues with people on this blog because quite frankly they haven’t done the research that sometimes can take years. Take for instant this herd immunity. Plain bullshit….the truth is many people just don’t create anti bodies to vaccines and go around falsely believing they are immune. The case study below has also happened in a New Zealand school. The teacher involved was interviewed on the radio a few years back. Funny it never made the mainstream news to the best of my knowledge.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3826461

          I could go on starting with Jenner who knew nothing of viruses and bacteria. He thought of vaccination on a hunch. At that time doctors believed infection was caused by Miasma ( a nasty smell). Ever since they have been back engineering, trying to find out why vaccines work. Perhaps they should revisit homeopathy?

          Vaccine/measles hysteria is becoming the latest ”in thing.” Lead by uneducated people and media, they are lumping most blame on anti vaxxers, when in actual fact overseas visitors, failed vaccines and anti vaxxers should all share some blame.

          Please let me reiterate, I’m not an anti vaxxer. Vaccines have some use. But there are big gaps in understanding of the science as the`unprecedented 100% eradication of smallpox compared with other vaccines shows.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  31st October 2019

            I don’t usually bother to spend too much time looking at a relatively small studies provided by people who don’t have proper medical training pretending only they have enuf self-acquired intellectual & “real” scientific grunt & knowledge to know the “facts”.

            They are usually focussed on finding small numbers of papers with results that back their own pet hunches or theories, when there are hundreds of studies showing the effectiveness of the vaccine & sound reasons for mass immunisation programmes, taking into account known & studied cases of vaccine failures & outbreaks.

            There’s a reasonable place to start here – & some links to follow up.
            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measles_vaccine

            The biggest problem with anti-vaxers’ is exactly the problem everyone had this time round. Suddenly nobody wants your infected unvaccinated kids anywhere near their uninfected unvaccinated kids when outbreaks occur. It doesn’t matter what the original source of the infection was – that’s a red herring. It’s the rate measles spreads thru unvaccinated populations & the serious health issues including fatalities it causes that matters.

            Outbreaks are one thing. Preventing epidemics is the most important thing.

            And the pollies take every opportunity to try & blame the current government for the outbreak by association.

            I’ll reply separately on the ‘enforceable contraception for solo mums’ thing when I’ve had a chance to mull it over. It’s the normal (or should be) standard approach to examining any suggested government policy suggested initiative. What are the things you can think of that can go wrong with this idea. Every administration reaches its use-by date with cases of policies that produced unpalatable unforeseen adverse outcomes where they failed to do this.

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  31st October 2019

              ”I don’t usually bother to spend too much time looking at a relatively small studies provided by people who don’t have proper medical training pretending only they have enuf self-acquired intellectual & “real” scientific grunt & knowledge to know the “facts”.

              Your comments tell me of a closed mind regarding this issue. Just one example- you say a relatively small study. It’s one of 100s available. I chose that one because it is very self explanatory and a little thought should tell you it raises alarm bells unless the data input is proven to be fraudulent.

              As to proper medical training? I’m afraid the average GP knows little of the mechanisms regarding vaccinations – they are doctors, not researchers or scientists. Now, some doctors do go down the route I have taken; they do their homework as best they can. These doctors then seem to hive off into two groups – those who’s faith in vaccinations are strengthened…and those who become disillusioned with vaccinations. I’m not saying any disbelieve in vaccinations, but some realise when they vaccinate they are far from offering a benign medical procedure that is as effective as claimed by the ‘Heath Ministry,’ I know this for a fact having talked to, and argued with, doctors over the years.

              I have over the years also corresponded with drug companies, The FDA ( who provided a detailed reply re Gardasil) . I have submitted a paper to a
              US senate enquiry. While Wiki can be of use, it’s second hand news, and in many cases, if I understand correctly, subject to alteration.

              Now, you have done none of this…simply because I doubt, like most, you have a passion for health issues. And there’s nothing wrong with that. We all have different passions.

              So let me reiterate… parts of the vaccination theory are quack science in my opinion. How vaccinations work is still not fully understood. The effectiveness of vaccinations long term is unknown. The media and public are now in the grips of measles hysteria. You may have seen similar regarding climate change.

              The reason I am learning speed reading is to increase my ability to devour more research.

            • Gezza

               /  31st October 2019

              The reason why vaccinations are effective in preventing pathogens causing disease & how they work is well understood and actually very simple. They are the very reason smallpox was eliminated worldwide by 1980.

              As I said, Wikipedia is only a start. And a GOOD thing about Wikipedia IS that it can be updated. You can dispute the information provided & details will be annotated to that effect, amended, or even removed – details of disputes can be checked in the Talk tab where readers can see that matters are in dispute.

              It also frequently provides an for balanced information where it actually published contrary viewpoints.

              Why on earth do you bring up Gardasil in a discussion about measles vaccinations?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  31st October 2019

              Miasma is not a nasty smell; it’s a noxious emanation such as the particles or effluvia from a putrefying body, which was considered to be unhealthy and may well be.

            • Corky

               /  31st October 2019

              ”Why on earth do you bring up Gardasil in a discussion about measles vaccinations.”

              It was an inconsequential part of my comments and was just expanding on how I contact major organisation to get first hand news on vaccines.
              I’m sure most will find it doesn’t detract from my comments, and will have no need to comment on it’s inclusion.

              If you want fun…wait for the Oracle to comment. I’m sure it has been in the forefront of vaccine development. Is an expert on contraindications regarding vaccine use, and has a plaque in its honour at Merck Sharp & Dohme headquarters.😂

            • Gezza

               /  31st October 2019

              You’re always good for a chuckle, Corks. I’ll give you that.
              I have to go out for some hours now.
              Will catch up later.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  31st October 2019

              Usual drivel from Corky; no one here has made such a claim about vaccinations.

              If he keeps referring contemptuously to a person as ‘it’, he’s asking for a call of ‘MOD’.

          • Blazer

             /  31st October 2019

            respect… 😉

            Reply
      • Gezza

         /  3rd November 2019

        @Corky
        Why isn’t the government forcing women on the DPB to have compulsory birth control
        … 3-monthly visits to the doctor. Failure to turn up..and the benefit is cut?

        …………………………….

        The first point I’d note is that if you want doctors or medical centres to notify MSD of a “failure to turn up” you’d have to legislate for that because I expect doctors’ unions would object strongly to being required to cooperate in (a) interfering in women’s reproductive rights, and (b) playing any role in further impoverishing solo mothers with children, thus penalising children & putting their health at risk thru making it harder for mothers to afford to the doctor if the child gets ill.

        I like the idea in theory, but cutting benefits to punish solo mothers who already have children and / deter usually young, poorly-educated, solo parent females from having more children while on benefits as a lifestyle choice will generate the usual storm of protests from women’s orgs all over the place, the Chikdren’s Commissioner, & voluntary social agencies & food banks who end up having to make up for the shortfall & are already vociferous about not making things worse for children by impoverishing their solo parent.

        This was the reaction to Paula Bennett’s suggestion just to push voluntary contraception more strongly to solo parents on benefits some years back. Something that made sense then & still does.

        I’m not happy with taxpayers, especially working parents, having to also pay to clothe, feed & house the children of feckless young women who don’t want to work & just want to be solo mums & expect to be paid by the state to support however many kids they want to have. But

        I’d like to know just how big a problem it actually is. I don’t think there any reliable stats on this, & I seem to recall that the recorded rate of teenage pregnancies in NZ has been dropping. Even with the increase in benefits under Winston’s coalition government, I imagine there are not a lot of women who see struggling along on a benefit as a great choice for their future.

        Reply
    • Duker

       /  30th October 2019

      It’s all about increasing Bridges polling numbers, the staff are working hard on the social media space. Policy is just stuff they had from 2009 to 2017 but were blocked by Dunne and Maori party ..yawn

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  30th October 2019

        Yeah. I think most of this is only going to appeal to existing hard core National voters, but they make pick up some disenchanted authoritarian NZF voters I guess.

        Young women are still going to vote for Jacinda’s party in droves, because she’s a woman, dressing, & presenting as a caring younger woman, & better at using social media to appeal to young, life-inexperienced voters than Bridges can ever hope to.

        Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  31st October 2019

        Corky banging on again about the Oracle; he hasn’t the guts to identify this person, as this would mean that the snide fabrications (i.e. lies) would have to cease. He hasn’t the good manners to use a personal pronoun (he or she) but insultingly refers to this person as ‘it’.

        The gratuitous insults are pathetic.

        Corky should say who the ‘Oracle’ is or shut up. His spiteful sniping is pathetic, and one can only hope that he outgrows it, unlikely as this probably is.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  1st November 2019

          you are the Oracle…you have anecdotal evidence about everything except…giving birth.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  1st November 2019

            MOD. Totally uncalled for personal remarks.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st November 2019

              Vicious personal comments designed to be hurtful.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  2nd November 2019

            One didn’t need to be Sherlock Holmes to work out who Corky meant or that, by not identifying them, he was free to make snide insinuations and attribute views and words to them that bore no resemblance to the truth. This is the person who claimed that I had called the young Pakeha professional couple across the road from me ‘feral Maoris’ ( I hadn’t, of course, mentioned them in any way at all) and told various other stupid lies about me. He ‘knew’ that I don’t own my house (I do, and it’s mortgage free) and had no insurance (I have) and so on…

            He has no idea, needless to say, of what an oracle is or what one does. One needn’t have the advantage of a classical education like mine to know this; it’s likely to be in any dictionary.

            Reply
  8. Corky

     /  30th October 2019

    The Oracle is on deck, with more riveting observations. An expert on waka… now an expert on reading stats. Hell, we are lucky to have it. 😁

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  30th October 2019

      No one here has claimed to be an expert on either of those things, although you seem to imagine yourself to be one on both. Please tell where you saw this claim to be an expert.

      The figures that I quoted were accurate ones.

      If you are going to bang on and on about the supposed Oracle, do the person the courtesy of using he, she or they. One does not refer to a human being as ‘it’. The Oracle thing is becoming very boring, but no doubt it will become even more so as you keep on and on and on saying it. It’s very tedious when someone doesn’t know when to let something drop.

      Reply
  9. Trump: I did it.

    Giuliani: And I helped.

    Yovanovitch: They did it.

    Mulvaney: Hell yes we did it. We do it all the time. We’ll do it again. In fact I’m doing it right now.

    Pompeo: We did it.

    Taylor: They did it.

    Volker: They did it.

    Hill: They did it.

    Vindman: I sat in on the call. They did it.

    Sondland. We didn’t do it. Oops, I mean we DID do it. Thanks a lot, Vindman.

    Anderson: They did it.

    Croft: They did it.

    Republicans: WE SEE NO EVIDENCE OF WRONGDOING.

    Reply
  10. Duker

     /  31st October 2019

    Guess who has been caught altering temperature records, the Australian BOM.
    Lovely gif on how they make it seem more hot days per year recently than previous decades

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  31st October 2019

      Do you got a link to explain this? At the moment its just a gif with moving bars.

      Reply
    • Griff.

       /  1st November 2019

      The BOM gives links to the peer reviewed science it uses to adjust the data .
      Disputing their adjustments on some whacko blogshite is easy because there is no quality control.
      Disputing BOM in reputable scientific publications however must reach standards that exclude such nonsense .

      ACORN-SAT version 2

      The Bureau’s updated dataset is known as ACORN-SAT version 2, or simply, ACORN-SAT.

      The first version of ACORN-SAT was published in 2011, while ACORN-SAT version 2 was published at the end of 2018. It is standard practice for major meteorological organisations to update their datasets, to ensure they are incorporating the latest scientific understanding, computing capabilities and additional data.

      ACORN-SAT is an adjusted temperature dataset. When considering long-term temperature trends, it is important that scientists account for any non-climate factors that may have influenced the data over time. These can include things like changes in the location of observing sites, and changes in observing technology. These factors can artificially influence temperature data, and affect the estimation of temperature changes over time. ACORN-SAT accounts for these artificial influences through a process called homogenisation (see FAQs for more information). Not accounting for these factors would neglect the Bureau’s commitment to delivering accurate and robust climate data to the Australian community.

      The purpose of updating datasets like ACORN-SAT is principally to incorporate data that has been recorded since the last analysis was released, as well as historical paper records that have been recently digitised. ACORN-SAT version 2 also incorporates the findings and recommendations of the Technical Advisory Forum, applies the latest scientific research and understanding and, where applicable, introduces new methodologies. The overall aim of the update to ACORN-SAT is to provide improved estimates of historical changes in climate.

      There are several independent datasets which allow the description of Australia’s long-term temperature trends. The Bureau of Meteorology alone maintains several datasets using a number of different analysis techniques. This includes data that has been adjusted to account for changes in observing practices, data that is unadjusted, data that is unadjusted and spatially interpolated, and data that has been ‘reanalysed’ with a numerical weather model. Maintaining multiple datasets ensures the Bureau has the capacity to compare and analyse different methods for developing long-term temperature datasets. Additionally, the UK MetOffice, NASA and NOAA in the US maintain their own analyses for the Australian region.

      Importantly, each of the datasets described above, including ACORN-SAT version 2, show a consistent picture of warming temperatures for Australia over the past 110 years, with most of the warming occurring since the middle of the 20th century, and good agreement between the datasets over that period.

      Extensive peer-review has confirmed the rigour of the Bureau’s methods for developing the ACORN-SAT version 2 dataset. More information on the updates can be found in the ACORN-SAT version 2 technical report or frequently asked questions. The Bureau’s work to improve the ACORN-SAT dataset is ongoing. Future updates to the data are likely to be prompted by further scientific advancements or additional historical data being digitised and therefore available for analysis.

      http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/data/acorn-sat/

      A large number of organisations are included in Dukers whack conspiracy theory from BOM to the Royal Society of Science ….What would you believe The scientific establishment vrs some nutters on a random blogshite?

      Reply
  11. Duker

     /  31st October 2019

    Its self explanatory, read the top caption. The bottom axis is every year since ,1910.
    Version 2 is the faked data newer version from BOM. Older version was also from BOM
    The overall effect is number of very hot days counted per year before 2000 has been reduced to make it seem current years are ‘hotter than ever’…..now why would they do it.
    It’s been publicised by a federal MP from Liberal party.
    I found NZ Stats hid the huge discrepancy between predicted population during census month and the count from the ‘census’ usually there’s a 15k difference this time it was more like 120k people.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  31st October 2019

      Oh. Ok. That’s interesting. That explanation is not actually deductible from that gif, so it’s not self-explanatory. I’m not big on the theory that it’s all a huge conspiracy. What has the BOM had to say in reply?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  31st October 2019

        *deducible

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  1st November 2019

          Ima bit wrorried you dont understand simple bar graphs…you do know what a bar graph is ?
          Big conspiracy ? Who mentioned that? I just said the Australian Bureau of Meteorology has been altering its records to remove previous decades details of days of very hot temperatures.
          “1952 had more hot days than any year since. Not any more. All those poor sods in 1952 who endured an average twenty one 40-degree-plus days will find now that it wasn’t really that hot”
          A very hot day was under the ‘old system’ 100F or 37.8C

          Why would they do this ? Surely the current rising temperatures evidence doesnt need help by reducing past temperatures . It seems like at the BoM they do .
          Yes there is a pattern even of daily cold temperatures at some locations being altered- if it was a politician we could say they were lying through their teeth … based on their own evidence. After if there is no evidence of increasing hot days what does that suggest?

          I know you will dismiss this as “conspiracy”, when its you that sees that angle
          http://joannenova.com.au/2019/10/the-australian-bureau-of-met-hides-50-years-of-very-hot-days/

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  1st November 2019

            What you posted is a graph showing two separate lots of temperature records, alternating – and

            “Guess who has been caught altering temperature records, the Australian BOM.
            Lovely gif on how they make it seem more hot days per year recently than previous decades”.

            I clicked on the gif but all I got was the gif.

            What is there in those two components of your post that explains HOW they made the hot days temps look so different?

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  1st November 2019

              I think you should stick to Dead Poets.
              One gif was the previous official data of the numbers of really hot days per year, the other one is the adjusted data which shows that selected, mainly the peaks before about 2000′ have been reduced. The result from the gif makes crystal clear, for most, is that current very hot days per year aren’t too different from 30, 40, 50 years ago.
              Some people are hard wired to believe all the tosh of Extinction Rebellion but struggle with simple historical data comparisons. Go figure that , without a gif

            • Gezza

               /  1st November 2019

              I think you should pull your head in.

              You produced a graph which said these figures are different.

              Temperature records have been recalibrated as a result of various factors or claimed factors in other instances where they have been disputed ever since the hockey stick debacle.

              I wanted to know WHY those figures were different. Had you simply posted the link to the artiicke above, with the gif, there would have been no need for this exchange.

              Thank you. You may reinsert your head back up there now.

          • Gezza

             /  1st November 2019

            Well, it’s certainly a bad look. I followed a link in that to another article where the BOM explains its methodology is so complex it can’t be replicated by anyone else. Just bizarre.

            Reply
  12. Corky

     /  1st November 2019

    Listen, think and become very concerned. Either the Chinese Ambassador has a gun to her head, or she just doesn’t give a damn about New Zealand.

    I would be interested to know if others share my concern, or whether I’m just being a little paranoid.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2019/10/kiwi-academic-anne-marie-brady-hits-back-at-chinese-ambassador-s-claims.html

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  1st November 2019

      No, I don’t think you’re being paranoid. This is a cause for concern & ongoing investigation / monitoring by the applicable authorities here. The authoritarian PRC government is acutely sensitive to criticisms or what it perceives as criticisms. The ambassador wouldn’t need a gun held to her head. Her job like any other ambassador’s is to do & say what her superiors instruct her to. Or be recalled & replaced.

      Reply
  13. Blazer

     /  1st November 2019

    enjoy…

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  2nd November 2019

      Perfect. They’re still as good as ever. 👍🏼

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  2nd November 2019

        The loss of Walter Becker is a tragedy. He created something that isn’t produced today- music!

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  2nd November 2019

          We were lucky to have about 10 years of an incredible variety of really great popular music from ground-breaking very talented musicians.

          There are still some around, but not as many & most contemporay artists’ songs are much the same & easily forgettable, imo.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  2nd November 2019

            *contemporary

            WordPress is behaving a bit weird for me at the moment. On the iPad anyway. I get the orange dot on the bell when someone’s replied to a comment of mine, but clicking on it for the usual preview only works once per login. For subsequent replies, I just get the orange dot indicator appearing, but the preview list of all replies won’t come up when the dot’s clicked on unless I close out & log in again.

            Reply
  14. Corky

     /  2nd November 2019

    What are the chances of this scientist getting mainstream media coverage? Limited at best would be my bet.

    Crikey..is Ken Ring right…and ex mainstream angst monger, Johnny Campbell, wrong?

    https://electroverse.net/acclaimed-israeli-astrophysicist-suggests-that-the-sun-drives-earths-climate-not-co2/

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  2nd November 2019

      Quote:

      ”But I thought that 97% of climate scientists agreed that human activity is the main driver of climate change?”

      “Only people who don’t understand science take the 97% statistic seriously,” said Shaviv. “Survey results depend on who you ask, who answers and how the questions are worded. In any case, science is not a democracy. Even if 100% of scientists believe something, one person with good evidence can still be right.”

      Wrong! Consensus science has taken over from true science. That one scientist..or handful of scientists who disagree with the mainstream will be hounded into oblivion..and their work skewered so as to be proven wrong.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  2nd November 2019

        Very good, quite balanced article on his research & climate change theory in Wikipedia. Doesn’t seem to be being hounded into oblivion.

        (Probably deserves a more accurate label than “climate change denialist” at the start. There are very few scientists contesting that climate change is happening; most are disputing that it’s solely caused by anthropogenic global warming, and/or that global warming is a bad thing, and/or that the predicted catastrophic sea level rises &/or more frequent extreme global weather events & massive amounts of global ice mass losses are actually happening.)

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nir_Shaviv

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  2nd November 2019

          He would seem to be at the top of his game and too powerful to bring down. That said, I believe he wouldn’t be receiving an invite to discuss ” real climate change issues.”
          That he’s straight off called a ‘denier’ speaks volumes.

          But what about average scientists who’s tenure relies on funding, corporate cooperation and providing the right results?

          This is ironic, but shows how things work. In this case we have the reverse – scientists losing jobs because they don’t support Trumps views on climate change.

          https://www.revealnews.org/blog/scientist-who-resisted-censorship-of-climate-report-lost-her-job/

          Quote:

          ”Caffrey, who worked under a contract with the National Park Service, resisted efforts by federal officials to remove all references to human causes of climate change in her scientific report. After Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting reported the attempts at censorship, Democratic members of Congress called for an investigation, and last May, the park service released the report with all the references reinstated.

          Caffrey’s contract expires on Friday. Park service officials told her last year that they would hire her for a new project. But they notified her today that no funding is available for the work.”

          Reply
  15. Corky

     /  2nd November 2019

    Poor old Sir Bill English. He believed these people may have been interested in his abortion concerns and views. Did he not observe what has happened to gun owners? Liberals hate people who don’t think like them Notice this was described as a ‘fiery debate.’

    I’m picking Sir Bill didn’t endear himself to the committee when he described what nurses are required to do during the abortion process. Such graphic details should always be subservient to ‘ a woman’s right…after making a difficult decision to have an abortion.’

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/10/former-pm-sir-bill-english-and-green-mp-jan-logie-in-fiery-debate-over-abortion-law.html

    Reply
    • Corking

       /  2nd November 2019

      Maybe this was the problem? Here’s a classic clip of a typical woke Leftie woman. Since when is a debate…not having a debate?

      https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/10/watch-labour-mp-slams-green-leader-for-mansplaining/

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  2nd November 2019

      It appears Bill & Mary (with their tribe of kids most people couldn’t afford to have) are opposed to taking the abortion law out of the Crimes Act.

      The topic that got heated seems to be Bill’s contention medical staff who object to performing or assisting with abortions may be eirher forced to, or forced out of their jo, because their employing DHB is obligated to provide abortion services.

      Newshub beat up. There’s nothing particularly unusual in this exchange. Elective abortion always generates strong views. It’s not a pleasant topic or procedure.

      The Englishes seem to be the aggressives in that article.

      Reply
  16. Corky

     /  2nd November 2019

    Denmark takes tentative steps to protect its culture (?). Meanwhile in Aotearoa, Indian migrants tell the government how things should be.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/09/11/refugees-are-fleeing-denmark-a-scandinavian-wonderland-en-masse/?fbclid=IwAR22IZPc-XM63ojH7tk4Afyi8YjsP_foCYpXdr6UMrlJlMyQqieKOIwKgvc

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  2nd November 2019

      I predict we will have an Indian P.M in the next 20 years,unless the Natz completely sell out to China.
      Shipley,Key,Brash,Collins,…they seem to just love that yuang.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  2nd November 2019

        You are a nasty customer, Blazer. However, you may be right on that. There’s more Indians in National than you can poke a stick at.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  4th November 2019

          The Denmark thing has nothing to do with Danish culture, as anyone who reads it will see. This was hardly a surprise, needless to say.

          In fact, the refugees were mostly passing through anyway. Some Danes are welcoming them and being kind to them, there’s even a picture of a Danish policeman playing with a refugee child.

          The Indians here are NOT telling the government how things should be, they are objecting to one thing only; the idea that married couples should have been together for a certain time. They are also justifiably angered by Shane Jones’ insulting comments.

          Reply
  17. Corky

     /  2nd November 2019

    A master class in suspended chords. The great late Tama Renata maintains the pressure
    and dissonance such chords bring. He sometimes relieves the tension with small lead runs before the songs major lead riff.

    Because of a job I once held, I hung out with local muso’s, who in turn introduced me to some of the better know stars of the day – Ragnarock, Butler, Sir Duke, Larry Morris and Chicago Smoke Shop. One day, during a muso session, the boys started talking about Tama’s decision not to take up a offer from Carlos Santana to be his supporting guitarist.
    The discussion became very animated with a variety of opinions. My GUESS is Tama thought he was good enough not to play second fiddle to anyone.

    The notes say this clip was filmed in Newmarket. I’m probably wrong, but it looks like the famous old Beacham Jaguar workshop in Hastings.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  2nd November 2019

      Tama along with Armand Crown,Josie Rikka and friends was resident band at ‘Cleopatra’s’ in Morrin Rd Panmure for many years.
      Great muso’s totally in touch with international…trends.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  2nd November 2019

        Was that your local, or did you just go when you wanted to take a show in? I never saw him play in Auckland.

        Reply
  18. Gezza

     /  3rd November 2019

    Boris bans fracking (until after the election?)

    The UK government has called a halt to shale gas extraction – or fracking – in England amid fears about earthquakes.

    The indefinite suspension comes after a report by the Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) said it was not possible to predict the probability or size of tremors caused by the practice.

    Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom said it may be temporary – imposed “until and unless” extraction is proved safe.

    Labour, Lib Dems and the Green Party want a permanent ban.

    Fracking was suspended at the end of August after activity by Cuadrilla Resources – the only company licensed to carry out the process – at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire caused a magnitude 2.9 earthquake.

    The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy said that, after the OGA concluded that further seismic activity could not be ruled out, “further consents for fracking will not be granted” unless the industry “can reliably predict and control tremors” linked to the process.

    However, it has stopped short of an outright ban.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50267454

    Interesting. We never hear any more about earthquakes caused by fracking in Trump’s Amerika.

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  3rd November 2019

      The hysteria here around the ‘earthquakes’ is quite funny. Most of the tremors have been no more than a 2 on the richter scale, but is seen as being a huge problem, some people have even claimed to have felt these ‘earthquakes’ from fracking, even though they are undetectable, and the greenies claiming to feel them don’t live in areas where fracking is occurring.

      However, G, I believe it will be until after the election, I think it will quietly be lifted 6-12 months after if Boris wins, but then again who knows, his girlfriend is an environmentalist and animal welfare campaigner, and her influence has already been present in some policy around animal rights, also in other areas that have impacted her personally unrelated to the environment.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  3rd November 2019

      Adaptation beats mitigation yet again.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  3rd November 2019

        (I am assuming, from the expression on the other gentlemans face, that the learned gentleman on the left has just won his case.)

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  4th November 2019

          The ban is only temporary while the heatwave lasts.

          I’d say that that the man on the right is what’s called a ‘white wig’ (Rumpole) who hasn’t had his very long. The other man looks as if he’s well used to his.

          Reply
  19. Gezza

     /  3rd November 2019

    First Pookden Manor Monarch of 2019 Spring

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  4th November 2019

      We have them all year here. I often see them on fine days, the lovely things.

      Reply
  20. Gezza

     /  3rd November 2019

    Lol 😄

    Smugglers are sawing through new sections of Donald Trump’s border wall

    “Trump has increasingly boasted to crowds in recent weeks about the superlative properties of the barrier, calling it “virtually impenetrable” and likening the structure to a “Rolls-Royce” that border-crossers cannot get over, under or through.”

    But, in fact

    “Smuggling gangs in Mexico have repeatedly sawed through new sections of US President Donald Trump’s border wall in recent months by using commercially available power tools, opening gaps large enough for people and drug loads to pass through, according to US agents and officials.

    The breaches have been made using a popular cordless household tool known as a reciprocating saw that retails at hardware stores for as little as $US100 ($NZ155).

    When fitted with specialised blades, the saws can slice through one of the barrier’s steel-and-concrete bollards in a matter of minutes, according to the agents, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to speak publicly about the barrier-defeating techniques.

    After cutting through the base of a single bollard, smugglers can push the steel out of the way, allowing an adult to fit through the gap.”

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/117129102/smugglers-are-sawing-through-new-sections-of-donald-trumps-border-wall

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  4th November 2019

      The chickens are coming home to roost, at just the RIGHT time. I recently talked to people who are moving on from homes they have rented for years because their landlord is getting out of the market. I truly wish anyone looking for rental accommodation, the best of luck. You will need it.

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/117131322/number-of-electricity-grants-skyrockets-lines-drawn-in-cost-of-living-battle

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  4th November 2019

        are these landlords ‘getting out of the market’,demolishing their homes …then?

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  4th November 2019

          No, selling them for a handsome profit. Although, if Labour wasn’t in power they would probably have preferred the passive income renting provides. I will let you in on a secret, Blazer – passive income is the mainspring of wealth.

          Oh, the penny has just dropped….like renters can afford to buy a house. That’s why they rent. Many renters rely on WINZ for help. That someone will buy the house. doesn’t better the housing demographic renters are in.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  4th November 2019

            Many landlords rely on WINZ for help.
            The reality is,that rent is often more than mortgage repayments,but the inflated prices mean ,deposits are out of reach of the hoi polloi.
            Now a rigged game.

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  4th November 2019

              ‘Many landlords rely on WINZ for help.’

              Can you please expand on this.

              Landlords have many costs…starting with property managers.

    • Corky

       /  4th November 2019

      Er, well, that’s not where my comment should be, is it. But while we are at it…. live and learn. Those border breaches can be countered. That will be one less method criminals will use in the future. Some breaches were happening in areas that didn’t have sensors in place yet.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th November 2019

        Maybe. Smugglers like other human beings are notable for their ingenuity.

        The thing about that article I find amusing is Trump extolling the impregnability of the fence to his braying audience at the same time as its being breached with ease.

        That said, I wish the US well with eventually securing their borders. Kiwis would hate it if we were facing daily breaches of our borders by hordes or even small numbers of illegal immigrants.

        Reply

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