Open Forum – 25 November

This post is open to anyone to comment on any topic that isn’t spam, illegal or offensive. All Your NZ posts are open but this one is for you to raise topics that interest you, or you think may interest others.. 

If providing opinions on or summaries of other information also provide a link to that information. Bloggers are welcome to summarise and link to their posts. Comments worth more exposure may be repeated as posts. Comments from other forums can be repeated here, cut and paste is fine.

Your NZ is a mostly political and social issues blog but not limited to that, and views from anywhere on the political spectrum are welcome. Some ground rules:

  • If possible support arguments, news, points or opinions with links to sources and facts.
  • Please don’t post anything illegal, potentially defamatory or abusive.

FIRST TIME COMMENTERS: Due to abuse by a few, first comments under any ID will park in moderation until released (as soon as possible but it can sometimes take a while).

Sometimes comments will go into moderation or spam automatically due to mistyped ID, too many links (>4), or trigger text or other at risk criteria. If they pass muster they will be released as soon as possible (it can sometimes take hours).

Leave a comment

108 Comments

  1. Reply
  2. Found this yesterday. If you’re going to do a sugar tax, this is how to do it. Don’t just tax drinks. Tax the lot.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/23/norwegian-sugar-tax-confectionery-border-sweden

    Reply
  3. Reply
    • Corky

       /  25th November 2019

      ‘’Tough on crime’ rhetoric is cheap, easy and terrifyingly effective,”

      Sad, but true. No one wants to take real action. It’s always tinkering and compromises.

      Meanwhile the innocent and society suffer..and will suffer into the foreseeable future. Billions in lost working hours..billions on medical care.. and billions rebuilding shattered lives.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th November 2019

      “Take the bikes off bikies,” was Norm Kirk in 1972. Hard Labour and longer sentences belonged to Labour’s Phil Goff and Helen Clark in 1999. Three strikes was ACT in 2008. 600 more Police was National in 2008.

      But if New Zealand was wanting to use evidence to better the system that would keep us most safe what would we see the political aspirants’ campaign hardest about?

      *More use of therapy and rehabilitation earlier in sentences and keeping people on parole longer because it incentivises better behaviour.

      *more education in prisons and teaching more appropriate learning styles to prevent young people not learning in classrooms and going on to create victims when they should be in school.

      *a better and fairer process for victims who get dragged into a justice system which is conducted in a foreign language namely ‘legalese’, using outdated processes which are equally traumatic with the offending at the centre of the case being prosecuted. Victims of many crimes say they would never report again in the same circumstances because they have been so injured by the way we do ‘justice’ these days.

      *de-politicising the law and order debate and insist on cross-parliament accords on justice policy, so people win over politics.

      *better healthcare in prisons particularly mental health with 91% of people in prisons having a diagnoseable mental health disorder or drug dependency, without counting history of head-trauma.

      *better access for families particularly children to their parents in prison creating an incentive to behave and learn so families are safer and more aspirational when prisoners get released.

      There would be campaigns demanding better access to Restorative Justice Conferencing because this practise is the most effective against recidivism, even more so if accompanied by mentoring.

      Parties would campaign on work opportunities, education, and skills training for prisoners because the common denominators in prisoners returning to jails is a lack of education, skills, and work. It is easier to hate than it is to care enough to do something meaningful.

      We would recognise that drug charging polices on personal use possessory offending has been based on myths and a lack of understand in outdated legislation that was drafted in the mid-1970’s when people knew very little about the tide of drug use that was about to hit us.

      But these are all seen as “soft on crime” initiatives. Better to campaign on longer, tougher, more punitive sentences and policies. Nobody votes for principles with an evidence base in law and order policy. Such a level-headed approach would be a vote loser not a vote winner.

      And we keep doing it to ourselves. As much as we campaign about media reporting, we keep buying the news. As much as we complain about shallow political rhetoric, we keep rewarding those that push the button the hardest, for the weakest of reasons with the least evidence to prove it will ever work.

      Chester’s hardly a softy. Even ran over some irritating shrill lefty’s foot when she blocked his car. This stuff makes sense. Bridges’ stuff makes more crims & existing crims worse.

      Reply
  4. Reply
    • Corky

       /  25th November 2019

      The toxic duo. Holy anti smacking legislation, Batman.

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  25th November 2019

      I heard John Key saying it was an idea whose time had came and it being time for a bold decision. How well does Auckland do bold decisions? Should we get Dove-Myer Robinson back for a discussion about the ease of putting rail into the place in 1969 compared to 2019.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  25th November 2019

        Dove-Myer Robinson was a very naughty boy according to a past Labour Party president, Bob Harvey. I don’t think Dove-Myer would survive in today’s PC quagmire.

        Reply
  5. Blazer

     /  25th November 2019

    Auckland Ports CEO Tony Gibson made a case against it in the NZH(paywalled?).

    Even though he may have a vested interest, his information is I imagine way,way better than that of 2 ex P.M’s who have had their day.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  25th November 2019

      Tony Gibson may have the advantage of information. Accepting the two ex P.M’s may have had their day in some respects, not so long ago both had abilities many would argue would be unlikely to diminish. i.e. walking on the waters of that port. 🙂

      Seriously though the quoted values of port land shows how views and perspectives vary.
      Tony Gibson:
      “Wayne Brown claims the port land is worth $6 billion dollars. That’s an appealing notion, but wrong. We’re required by the Auditor General to value the port land as if it was in its ‘highest and best use’. Every time, skilled and experienced valuers say the land is worth less than a billion dollars.”

      Waterfront 2029 spokesperson Michael Goldwater said this morning that three years ago a valuer put the value at $3 billion.
      So $6b, $3b or less than $1b? Vested interests = trips to Specsavers for whom?

      https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/2018723930/helen-clark-john-key-back-auckland-port-moving

      Reply
  6. Blazer

     /  25th November 2019

    Aussie well behind the..times…
    ‘Mr Hastie says Australians should be “very concerned” about the alleged plot. “This isn’t just cash in a bag, given for favours, this is a state-sponsored attempt to infiltrate our parliament,” he said.
    “Using an Australian citizen and basically run them as an agent of foreign influence in our democratic system. So this is really significant and Australians should be very, very concerned about this.” Mr Hastie has called for a full investigation into Mr Zhao’s death.

    https://www.news.com.au/national/politics/alleged-plot-to-infiltrate-australian-government/news-story/a3cdbfb2830273e340ee22f9c4bea6b6

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th November 2019

      The Chinese Embassy on Sunday hit back at Wang and referenced a statement from Shanghai police, which said he was sentenced in Fujian province in October 2016 to one year and three months in prison for fraud, with a suspended sentence of 1.5 years.

      It said he was wanted in relation to a fraud case from earlier this year.

      “On April 19, 2019, the Shanghai police opened an investigation into Wang who allegedly cheated 4.6 million yuan [$653,482] from a person surnamed Shu through a fake investment project involving car import in February,” the statement said.

      The embassy said Wang left for Hong Kong on April 10 carrying a fake Chinese passport and a fake Hong Kong permanent resident ID, adding that the Shanghai police were investigating the matter.
      https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/11/china-alleged-spy-seeking-australia-asylum-fraudster-191124073101855.html

      Can we believe them though? Trumpy said these bastards invented global warming.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  25th November 2019

        “Can we believe them though? Trumpy said these bastards invented global warming.”

        They are also killing people to order for spare parts. Trump has this one right.

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th November 2019

      Very interesting history of Ihumātao here:

      https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/on-the-inside/396954/unearthing-the-history-of-ihumatao-where-the-land-tells-stories

      Worth a read to see why the place is so important to some Maori.

      Obviously Labour doesn’t want to engage directly with the Maori protagonists here because it’s essentially an internal hapu iwi dispute. The Maori king, who had an opportunity to resolve it, if he had the mana, kicked the can over the road to the government instead, because getting the two mana whenua factions to agree, or accepting that the deal was fine, wasn’t going to happen.

      The other difficulty the government has, obviously, is the “thin end of the wedge” problem. Getting actively involved in sorting this one out creates expectations that any hapu sub-group unhappy with what another group who has legal ownership has decided can get the government to effectively re-open settlement claims & now has a prececent.

      Tricky.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  25th November 2019

        “Tricky.”

        It’s not. They can chose between opening the can of worms, or not. The question will be simply if there is political advantage for them presiding over re-litigation of all treaty claims.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th November 2019

          It is. That question is certainly what they have wrestle with, but they also want to keep all te Maori seats. If they decide to go fund Auckland City Council to do the purchase here they are going to have to come up with a helluva good spin as justification for it & be very, very clear about why this is a “oncer” and not a precedent. They won’t like Pania for putting them in this spot.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  25th November 2019

            It can’t be a ‘oncer’. There is no spin on earth that will make that stick.

            They have a binary choice. They can fuck it all up of course, but, that is a question of competence, rather than the complexity of the situation.

            Reply
      • Corky

         /  25th November 2019

        That was an interesting read..not that I have ever disputed the accepted history of the area.
        My problem is woke people like Kanoa, who given her father lives on the East Coast, has no blood in the debate as far as I know. She’s overly emotional, and seems wilfully blind to the
        usual fractious way Maori have handled this issue.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th November 2019

          Well, yes, I can see your point here from your perspective. I also noted that the crowds who travelled from all over to join the protest included several who’ll climb onto any land claim dispute bandwagon & demand the country be given back to Maori, like the stupid young tosser at the Music Awards who said we’re all living on stolen land. He’ll know less about the complexity of settlement issues than you and me.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  25th November 2019

            3% of the entire country was confiscated, that includes barren mountains etc. Since most of the confiscations happened in a few areas and mostly of the better land there. But that’s not what they are teaching a young Maori generation

            Reply
  7. Zedd

     /  25th November 2019

    move over ‘Trumpy’ (MrT).. Bloomberg’s a-comin’ on down 😀 😀

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  25th November 2019

      The solution to all the Democrat’s problems is a 77 year old, white, billionaire. Arguably, the most privileged man to have ever lived.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  25th November 2019

        White,pale and stale..and a Democrat. Eh? I guess money is the universal currency when it comes to the crunch. I wonder how this oldie made his money? Not by capitalistic endeavours one would hope. What would Parti think?😡👍😊

        Reply
        • Trevors_elbow

           /  25th November 2019

          Extreme capitalism… servicing the ultimate capitalist terrors day traders…stock brokers and various types if bankers….Bloomberg overtook Reuters as the source if market information..

          Reply
      • Zedd

         /  25th November 2019

        Its the only thing.. that the power mongers/robber barons really care about.. oh dear Zedd_cynic is back 😀

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  25th November 2019

          He’s both Russian and Jewish, I would think those both exclude him from leadership of the Democrat party.

          Reply
  8. Corky

     /  25th November 2019

    Here’s an example of the liberal bs I have argued infests our justice and corrections system.
    This is why I argue for tough action against criminals.

    Why are these protesters still protesting? Fugg, it’s a 10 minute job to warn them; baton them for non-compliance if pessary, and arrest them. Instead, they are in negotiation with the police. What the fugg???!

    What a pathetic little country we are.

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/404030/protesters-remain-in-omv-oil-ship-to-protest-over-global-emissions

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  25th November 2019

      *necessary* Although a ‘pessary’ wouldn’t be out of the question..for both men and women.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th November 2019

      I’m beginning to wonder if you’re a sociopath, bro. It’s one thing to argue the police should be boarding in numbers, trespassing them, arresting, & then simply physically removing them, but your apparent obsession with beating protestors up first is frankly rather disturbing.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  25th November 2019

        & I think we shouldn’t even go there with your other strange sexual thing.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  25th November 2019

          I’v seen worse from protesters…and Steven Joyce has experienced worse from a liberal drip.

          Reply
      • Corky

         /  25th November 2019

        Quite the contrary. Please read my comments again. I’m beginning to wonder if you are secretly a liberal apologist for people who hurt the innocent.🤔 Kitty has the habit of doing the same thing. My comments are always based on an offender being given a warning, before action is taken. I’m searching for what is unreasonable about that.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th November 2019

          Er … I think the police should go in, trespass them, arrest them, & then wrap them firmly in their gentle but manly (and/or womanly) & loving, long arms of the law, & simply quietly pick the blighters up, place them in a large, secure police bus/van & remove them to the nearest office of the constabulary with cells, as they often do with protestors who are preventing people from going about their lawful business including entering and leaving their places of business.

          What’s unreasonable is that there’s no need to beat them up. These folk are generally passive pussies for whom doing their worst usually amounts to lying down & yelling out stoopid shite so they have to be physically carried away to the grins, applause, & thumbs up of amused onlookers.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  25th November 2019

            ”What’s unreasonable is that there’s no need to beat them up.”

            What?!

            I wrote:

            ”Why are these protesters still protesting? Fugg, it’s a 10 minute job to warn them; baton them for non-compliance if nessary, and arrest them.”

            Nowhere did I suggest beating them up. Using the baton is an art ( obviously lost on our police). If it had to be used it would .. ah, forget it. Let’s move on

            No where did I suggest direct force as a first option.

            I believe you are coming from the perspective of ”we don’t need the baton, it’s overkill. Arrest them and move them on. They are basically pussies. Words and thoughts to that effect.

            So let’s examine that:

            1- Police manpower is being wasted with negotiation. Yep, negotiating with lawbreakers instead of arresting them. At what cost to police – dollars and manpower hours?

            2- Protracted breaching of property rights. What is it costing the victims in revenue? Contracts?

            3- No intention of moving.

            4- And this: Quote from the link.

            ”Mr Brazil said police negotiators had been in contact with them and so far, they had not been trespassed.

            “They were saying we were doing a good job and that’s recognising that this is a system’s problem and sometimes good people do have to disobey bad laws.”

            If that’s true..corruption/ dereliction of duty charges should be laid against the commanding police officer.

            it’s not hard to see why we disagree. I’m talking reality.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  25th November 2019

              it’s not hard to see why we disagree. I’m talking reality

              Batons? Lost art? This isn’t the ’81 Springbok Tour. You are talking unreality. An over the top reaction like you are proposing would waste even more police time & resources. Fronting media to discuss police brutality, more protests from a lot of unconnected people about that same issue, police being taken to Court for assault etc etc.

              So let’s examine your examination:

              “1- Police manpower is being wasted with negotiation. Yep, negotiating with lawbreakers instead of arresting them. At what cost to police – dollars and manpower hours?”

              Don’t know the cost. Agree entirely they should be trespassed and removed from the ship & scene.

              “2- Protracted breaching of property rights. What is it costing the victims in revenue? Contracts?”

              Yup. Should just arrest them & move them on.

              “3- No intention of moving.”

              Fine, the police should just pick them up & move them then, into a cop shop.

              “4- And this: Quote from the link.

              ”Mr Brazil said police negotiators had been in contact with them and so far, they had not been trespassed.

              “They were saying we were doing a good job and that’s recognising that this is a system’s problem and sometimes good people do have to disobey bad laws.”

              If that’s true..corruption/ dereliction of duty charges should be laid against the commanding police officer.”

              You have to remember these are the words of that SJW prat, who was too busy on the audio listening to the sound of his own voice & absurd things he was saying than to Corin. I haven’t heard the police version of events & discussions.

              It’s up to the company to pursue the police for costs if they want. Personally I think the cops should just arrest & remove them & charge them with trespassing.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  25th November 2019

              No, you’re talking nonsense.

              What kind of mind sees beating people with batons as an art ? And seems to regret that the police don’t do it ?

              These people are a nuisance and are stopping others going about their lawful business, but as they are not using violence, there can be no justification for police brutality or sexual assault.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  25th November 2019

          Need I say that the views attributed to me by Corky are another of his lies, based on nothing but his own malice ? At no time have I said or thought that or any of the other things claimed by him, they are all from his sick little mind. I can’t begin to count the lies he’s told about me; the fool even made up one about my calling my Pakeha neighbours across the road, a young professional couple, feral Maoris when I had never mentioned them here as there was no reason to.

          His salivating over people being hurt is very disturbing.

          Saying that I am an apologist for people who hurt the innocent (a stupid lie, of course; and if it was ‘secret’, how would he know, anyway?) is ironic coming from someone who gets off on the contemplation of pain being inflicted. Even the cliched metaphors he uses tend to be pain-related.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  25th November 2019

            There seem to be four very gullible PDTs, if they believe anything that Corky says. Given that one is likely to be him, it means that there are three.

            He is a malicious liar and anything he says about me is likely to be a lie, as should be obvious,

            Reply
  9. Gezza

     /  25th November 2019

    Ali Mau headlining on Stuff with some very detailed disingenuous murder porn brushed lightly with sanctimony in an attempt to disguise it.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th November 2019

      The trial is over, Ali. Thanks to you & your pals in the media we all know far more about what went down than we would ever have expected to in past decades. And if you & your tv, print & online media buddies are going to carry on feeding off it, we’ll learn nothing new.

      It’s not about victim blaming. He makes us puke.

      It’s been a hard, sad lesson though, we can only hope, to any other young women travelling the world & thinking it’s a safe place & that you can naively trust smooth-talking, well-dressed, “well-heeled”, good-looking young men who’ll buy you drinks to meet you, & bed you, because you’re a liberated, smart, young lady.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  25th November 2019

        Lizzie Marvelly and others in the Herald are also cashing in, needless to say.

        No mention of the other 22 year old whose killer was found guilty on the same day, of course.

        It’s something that that killer was honest about the violence and the violence in his past…if he can act on this, there’s some hope for him.

        Reply
  10. Corky

     /  25th November 2019

    Part 2 of Kitties attempt to offer her suggestions for prison reform is posted above. Strangely it’s all about me(Corky). But then strangeness and Kitty go together. Let’s hope she starts offering her opinions for critical review by other blog members. Living off other peoples posts is not what I consider a contribution to blog debate. Neither is taking repetitive mock offence.

    Stay tuned folks. More updates tomorrow. 😊

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  26th November 2019

      Once again; at no time have I offered suggestions about how prisons should be reformed.That is another of Corky’s lying distortions.

      There is nothing ‘above’ that even mentions this. Another lie.

      This is the person who wanted us to believe that one of his many nieces had her vehicle serviced free of charge by WINZ every year and provided withe free tyres and petrol. WINZ also bought uniforms and other school-related items for her children. Needless to say that WINZ’s own website states that they pay for none of these things for anyone.

      I agreed that first name use in prisons is a good idea and disagreed that Corky’s sadistic violence and fear regime would be effective. I was not alone in this.

      This is hardly making suggestions for prison reform, unlike Corky’s wish to have prisoners treated with contempt and violence, even shot by the warders.

      Cork’s statement about my offering suggestions for prison reforms is a lie, like so many things that he says. For some reason I have been chosen as his main target for lies, distortions and offensive sneers.

      No amount of refuting his falsehoods seem to have any effect. He was barred for it once, and if he goes far enough he may be again.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th November 2019

        For some reason I have been chosen as his main target for lies, distortions and offensive snears.

        Irresistible force meeting immovable object, I’m afraid. You both target (& not infrequently misrepresent) each other. I can’t even remember who started it, but expecting PG to parent you both is a bit much.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  26th November 2019

          *sneers, smears, whatever…

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  26th November 2019

            I naturally respond to lies and insults about me; who wouldn’t ? Very few people would not object to gratuitous abuse and outright lies about themselves.No one’s that tolerant.

            Corky has been attempting to goad and defame me from the beginning; it was not I who was banned for slandering and abusing him, it was he who was banned for doing it to me.

            At no time have I lied about him and attributed words and views to him that were complete inventions as he constantly does to me. His offensive aggression is trolling. Yes, he does it to other people but I am the main target. The childish and false statements at the beginning of this section are an obvious example of his gratuitous spite and stupid lies.

            It may be plain sexism; he also abused Possum and at one time was saying that she was neither a woman nor a Maori although he had never met her and others here had.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  26th November 2019

              You goad each other. A pair of tattle- tales.

            • Gezza

               /  26th November 2019

              Altho yes, I agree, at the moment his snide attempts to suggest you must be postulating some alternative prison reform proposal to his Sheriff Arpaio-style preference is absurd & becomng tiresome.

  11. Corky

     /  25th November 2019

    Here’s help for folk who don’t believe use of the baton is an art form. There are many different styles. I have used two American clips to show the difference between the art of baton use..and a simple beating that people continue to believe I advocate.

    It’s a worry to me that our police seem to have lost this art form, with only a small part remaining for riot control. Across the world the baton is considered a very important piece of kit.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  26th November 2019

      In hindsight, the beating Rodeney King recieved was worse than worse. It was a wonder King survived. My guess is the cops were tired of dealing with black abuse directed at them and decided to deal to the next black who caused them problems. King was unfortuantely that person.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  26th November 2019

        He was speeding and took off instead of pulling over.

        They jumped on him when he tried to run.

        Reply
  12. Alan Wilkinson

     /  26th November 2019

    This is a fascinating story but unfortunately pay-walled.

    Posted: https://yournz.org/2019/11/26/one-person-who-made-brexit-possible/

    Reply
  13. Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th November 2019

      I watched Q+A last night, because this was going to be on. I was underwhelmed with both Jack Tame as the interviewer & Dyhrberg as the Defence expert. My take away impression was that it’s not getting harder to defend people of sex offences. Although it might be getting harder to trash young women’s reputations as a standard defence tactic.

      There was also a segment featuring Simon Bridges. Jack gave him an easy time of it.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th November 2019

        *accused of sex offences

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  26th November 2019

        I’ve never rated Tame. The trouble with she says he says cases is that in the absence of other evidence they just become performance theatre in which one side has everything to lose and the other has self-belief at stake.

        Not sure that restricting other evidence is s good solution.

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th November 2019

      The Bridges segment (10 mins):

      Donations hullabaloo, crime/judicial system, Auckland port

      Reply
  14. Gezza

     /  26th November 2019

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/117637062/historian-says-it-is-time-to-officially-name-wellingtons-shocking-wind

    “With Wellington’s 180th birthday just around the corner, a historian says it is time for Wellingtonians to have a conversation about naming the wind. 

    But kaumātua Kura Moeahu from iwi Te Āti Awa said he had named two types in a haka called Kupe Hautoa. 

    The winds were called te hau mātakataka and te hau āwhiowhio  – te hau mātakataka referred to trees being filled and roofs being lifted while te hau āwhiowhio was connected to whirlwinds and tornados.”
    … … … …

    The main wind in North Welly is a fairly frequent, usually constant Norwester, when it blows, funnelling through the Strait. And our other notable one is the occasional Southerly Blast, which generally everyone in the country gets as it moves up the three islands.

    We don’t get frequent whirlwinds & tornados, so forget āwhiowhio, until we start getting some.

    The one that could do with a name is that blimmin irritating, Norwester, that makes everyone miserable & short-tempered. I’d call it 💨 Te Kiriweti – The Grumpy. 😠

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  26th November 2019

      As a Cantabrian born in Welly I was taught from a young age about Wellington weather:

      Three days a week it blows a howling gale from the north. The next three it blows a howling gale from the south. The last day is quite nice.

      My mother also had nightmares about pushing my pram up thousands of steps there.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th November 2019

        Well, while the Wellington Southerly gales are legendary, they’re actually not very common – the prevailing wind’s a Norwesterly. Easterlies are almost non-existent. I might notice one or two a year.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  26th November 2019

          I remember walking along a wharf with a friend and pretending that we were King Lear; ‘Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks !’ as the words were blown out of our mouths and we were nearly blown over

          I have seen roofing iron being blown like paper into the street.

          Then there’s the embarrassment of wearing a full skirt and doing a Marilyn Monroe impersonation…..

          Reply
      • Blazer

         /  26th November 2019

        fell out a few times and hit your head…I presume. 😉

        Reply
  15. Corky

     /  26th November 2019

    National to have a new police unit for tackling gangs. To be called Task Force Raptor 😂, it will deal with the small stuff associated with gangs. Modelled on the Australian unit, it has apparently been successful with harassing bikies in Aussie.

    Yea, but this is NZ. NZ is too woke. Maori, civil righties and social media will not like this. I
    can hear the whining already.

    This Bridge dude is becoming Baaad!

    Paywalled Aussie example.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12273289

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  26th November 2019

      yes but where can we deport them…to?

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th November 2019

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/117707632/national-partys-war-on-gangs-could-bans-patches-create-strike-force-raptor-police

      I think targeting & hassling the gangs sounds a good idea at first blush, although how they propose to deal with the possibility of an alliance among them & a war against the police that could soak up most of the police resources would be good to hear.

      There are supposedly some ideas in their policy for helping offenders with psychological & addiction issues, but their track record on diversion & rehabilitation initiatives & funding is woeful; cut taxes & they won’t have the money.

      Bridges predictably focuses on preaching the punitive doctrine; he’ll be hoping to pick up votes from hard-liners in NZF probably. The media & the gangs themselves are his best ally at the moment though.

      How he does will depend on how prominent the gangs are between now & the next election, and on what’s happening with crime stats. The government may want to fudge or slow those if they’re on the increase.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  26th November 2019

        ”Soak up most of the police resources would be good to hear.”

        In my area such a task force would need to entail at least 10 officers in my opinion.

        1- 6 Storm Troopers.
        2- I sniper
        3- 2 Comms
        4- 1 tactical driver.
        5- 1 Negotiator.

        This is assuming a planned hit is on eg…the example I gave of the MMob taking over the road networks when they have one of their funeral possessions in progress.

        Nah..It won’t be happening. Maybe in the metro areas.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  26th November 2019

          The Storm Troopers are a motorcycle gang.

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  26th November 2019

          I missed the News, but Leah Panapa read off a list of things this unit would target.

          1- Benefits
          2- Illegal structures
          3- Liquor licenses
          4- Illegal state housing
          5- Proof of ownership
          6- Car warrants

          I see, as predicted , the liberals are whining. Just listened to one gang-banger on talkback making an idiot of himself.

          Panapa: you already have a wife and kids. Why do you need a gang?

          Banger: Why not? You only live once!

          Reply
  16. Blazer

     /  26th November 2019

    Reply
  17. Corky

     /  26th November 2019

    32 dead from measles outbreak in Samoa

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2019/11/samoa-measles-related-deaths-reach-32.html

    I get this gut feeling we aren’t getting the full picture here. Something is missing from what is being reported.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th November 2019

      Ma reckons it’s low vaccination uptake – people feared getting their children immunised because of this:
      https://www.immune.org.nz/hot-topic/infant-deaths-samoa-tragic-outcome-error-preparing-mmr-vaccine

      I’ll find out where she got this from at lunchtime. She listens to ZB sometimes, although she loathes Hosking, so not to his show.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  26th November 2019

        The death rate is too high. This might be the problem:

        Death: 0.2%
        Encephalitis: 0.1%
        Pneumonia: 6% ++++
        Seizures: 0.6-0.7%

        I doubt Vit C is being administered as an adjunct. How many of these victims would still be alive today.?

        And this from the WHO. Again, I would doubt Vitamin A is being administered.

        Quote:

        ”Treatment

        No specific antiviral treatment exists for measles virus.

        Severe complications from measles can be reduced through supportive care that ensures good nutrition, adequate fluid intake and treatment of dehydration with WHO-recommended oral rehydration solution. This solution replaces fluids and other essential elements that are lost through diarrhoea or vomiting. Antibiotics should be prescribed to treat eye and ear infections, and pneumonia.

        All children diagnosed with measles should receive two doses of vitamin A supplements, given 24 hours apart. This treatment restores low vitamin A levels during measles that occur even in well-nourished children and can help prevent eye damage and blindness. Vitamin A supplements have also been shown to reduce the number of measles deaths.”

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  26th November 2019

      Ma said she saw something on telly last year about the two 2018 improperly administered vaccination-related deaths. She was guessing that this probably put a lot of people off immunising their kids.

      You might be right about the Vitamin A supplements not been given to sufferers.

      These are also possibly relevant:

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/117079712/samoa-measles-epidemic-immunologist-furious-at-new-zealand

      Seems to be blaming NZ for Samoa’s vaccination / health services’ failure though.

      https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2019/11/samoa-measles-crisis-thousands-of-vaccines-stolen-destroyed-in-midst-of-outbreak.html

      So there may have been vaccines administered that were rendered ineffective by improper storage?

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  26th November 2019

        Yes, I think it’s secondary issues that are more responsible for this mounting death toll, rather than the disease itself.

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  26th November 2019

      Good to see you haven’t gone off the deep end. True science is about always testing theories and beliefs. These people are explaining their theories. At least some have one.
      Using my methodology, we start with the fact these people are correct. So, the first hurdle to be jumped is this. Only a handful of humanity has seen our earth from space. We are therefore relying on second hand news. Denis Gabor gave us the hologram. A piece of the hologram holds all data of the original, no matter how small that piece. Bohm suggested the world around us is just a holographic projection. This is the secret on non locality in quantum physics. Space and distance is an illusion – just our perception. If we change the implicit order of the hologram we get a different perception/perspective.

      Maybe the round earth is just our agreed upon perception…backed up by agreed upon photos from a satellite that is floating in space because we perceive that it is ”floating in space”?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  26th November 2019

        No, it’s definitely not flat. It’s not a sphere either. It’s an oblate ellipsoid. The evidence for this is so overwhelming that one can only marvel at how little these people know.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  26th November 2019

          What you have just proven to me is you are a point scorer when it comes to science. My opening sentence saw to that. You aren’t inquisitive or an original thinker, as a true seeker of truth should be. I’m closing this debate from my end because you have just told me in there is nothing to debate.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  26th November 2019

            Good idea. The problem you have began with your starting with “the fact these people are correct”. The simple truth is, they’re not. And the evidence they’re not is ages old.

            You aren’t inquisitive or an original thinker, as a true seeker of truth should be.

            Yes I am. I’m both. I’m also a skeptic. Sensible people should be.

            When a theory is proved correct in so many multiple ways as the earth being an oblate spheroid, someone with a competing theory needs to disprove the current one or come up with an explanation that explains all the other proofs for the scientific explanation of all the facts and observations that show the earth is not flat.

            They can’t. Being an original thinker means little if you’re wrong. Flat earthers aren’t original thinkers, except for the range of ideas some of them can dream up to explain why the scientific method proves them wrong.

            Reply
            • Conspiratoor

               /  27th November 2019

              I’m not convinced G. Once you warm to the notion that we have been placed here by advanced beings as specimens in a computer simulation …any alternative reality becomes credible

            • Gezza

               /  27th November 2019

              Of course it does. But the waking day which you experience, I experience, & everybody else does, & we all experience it differently – & we experience it in 3D, & react to preceived stimuli, & are born & live and die, individually, so whether we are living in a holographic universe (which ties quantum mechanics & general relativity together mathematically, but has yet to be proven empirically) or not, for all practical purposes, it doesn’t really matter or make any difference to our existences, imo. We navigate & observe our earth & solar system with Newtonian physics & it works. Perception is reality, sure, but what reality is in that case still intersects with others’ realities in the same time & space, so our perceptions of physical reality are shared . Otherwise I’d just make you disappear & take Corky with you.

          • Griff.

             /  27th November 2019

            “It pays to keep an open mind, but not so open your brains fall out.”

            ― Carl Sagan

            Reply
  18. Blazer

     /  27th November 2019

    Corky has a valid position.
    If you research quantum physics and …qualia…it will make your brain hurt…however.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  27th November 2019

      Very interesting topic, Blazer. There seems to be little difference between quantum physics and magic. Gezza went fishing and hooked a shark. But did he? Or is that just a perception of my personal hologram?! 🤔✨

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  27th November 2019

      So have I. One can dabble in quantam mechanics & theoretical physics all they like (we’re possibly all living in a micoverse inside a quark) but for all practical purposes in the real world that we know & experience & need to navigate on a day to day basis the fact is the universe we live in obeys the laws of gravity, earth is spherical, like other large celestial objects, & the empirical evidence for this is irrefutable. The flat earthers shown in that video clip are mostly people who, from the interviews shown there, believe this to be a conspiracy.

      Reply
  19. Corky

     /  27th November 2019

    Mikey has reminded me of the difference between a Rightie and a Libertarian. Mikey agrees with these people braying for vaping to be banned. School principals are major drivers in this regard. Some say a third of their pupils are vaping. What? They should be happy. After an initial cost for treatment, many of these pupils, as they get older, may die. Think of the savings to our health system.

    This topic also brings to mind those folk who are far sighted; who can perceive the patterns of human behaviour and make a reasoned guess as to what may happen in the future. Like the gun owners whose semi automatic weapons disappeared the same day as the mosque terror attack. And the Chinese vape seller I spoke of who was quietly stocking up on vaping material at the multiple storage sheds he hires.

    Not a good day for Mikey in my books. But it must always be remembered, a Rightie is just a socialist who likes a little bit more fun than average… and believes in always allowing you to keep a little more of your pocket money before he steals the rest.

    Reply
  20. BBQs at polling booths? Who would run them? Political parties wouldn’t be able to.

    Reply
  21. Corky

     /  27th November 2019

    Ah, the middleclass. I do feel for them. Most are caring souls who have no idea how the other half live. Simon’s daughter can be thankful she wasn’t dealt to. It’s almost a given the abuser was Polynesian. Let’s hope she learnt a valuable lesson.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/video.cfm?c_id=1&gal_cid=1&gallery_id=214461

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  27th November 2019

      On the subject. I have just returned from town. It looks like Xmas stress has already hit the Polynesian community. I witnessed three altercations between bros and their sheilas.
      No class. Couldn’t give a stuff who heard. F this, fug that..you F’N C. Kids crying, spittle flying and things thrown. Yep, and I’m expected to believe things are improving under Labour.

      Reply
  22. Gezza

     /  27th November 2019

    10.58 am this morning. 4 foot long rare & declining (protected in all Wellington’s waterways) NZ native longfin eel, Elvira, dances for minute steak chunks. Everyone should have a stream.

    Reply
  23. Corky

     /  27th November 2019

    Coming out the supermarket I was accosted by a Chinese woman who said: Hey, fella, you need this. I looked at the pamphlet and it read ‘Falun Dafa.’ Ah, for the good old days of skinny white dudes with shaven heads, chanting: Hare Rama Ram Ram Hare Hare. At least we have some cultural ties to India…and the bald headed ones.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s