Law and Order Party? Or Posturing Populist PR Party?

National are trying to promote themselves as ‘the law and order party’, but are at risk of being seen more as a shallow, cynical, posturing populist PR party.

It may be popular to pick on gangs, and for good reason, some gang activities deserve condemnation. But we have had gangs for decades, and political rhetoric hasn’t made them disappear.

One problem with National’s ‘Strike Force Raptor’ proposal to harass gangs, which Simon Bridges described as “devastatingly effective” in Australia, is that they may disappear from view, but not go away.

National PR:

I don’t know what “take back control” is supposed to mean. Does National want the Government to take control of the drug trade? National has opposed liberalisation of cannabis laws, which leaves the drug for gangs to sell.

RNZ: Australian ex-cop blasts National’s ‘Strike Force Raptor’ plan

A former Australian detective has ridiculed National’s zero-tolerance approach to gangs, saying the strategy has been a “disaster” across the ditch.

National leader Simon Bridges repeatedly described the unit as “devastatingly effective” and referenced media reports which claimed it was driving outlaw bikies into extinction.

But former NSW detective Mike Kennedy told RNZ that was “nonsense” and Mr Bridges was “living a dream” if he believed that.

“He needs to pull his head out of whatever it’s stuck in because … [gangs] exist. They’re always going to exist. They just go underground.

“I’m not a bleeding heart liberal,” he said. “But [the zero-tolerance strategy has] just been a disaster.”

Dr Kennedy spent much of his time with the police as an undercover officer working in organised crime and is now a senior lecturer at Western Sydney University.

He said there was no evidence to suggest that gang numbers had fallen dramatically since the formation of Strike Force Raptor a decade ago.

“Outlaw motorcycle gangs are unregulated, so how would you know?” he said. “They’re not required to pay a fee … and register with government. So any suggestion that the numbers are down is just nonsense.”

Dr Kennedy said the problem had just been driven underground.

“People don’t stop being members of groups just because they’ve been arrested. They go into jail, they reinforce themselves, they come out, [and] they get more of a reason to remain in the group they’re in.”

Police officers needed a working relationship with communities, including gang members, so they would cooperate with investigations, he said.

 

A NSW Review of police use of powers under the Crimes (Criminal Organisations Control) Act 2012

Under the Crimes (Criminal Organisations Control) Act 2012, the Supreme Court can declare that an organisation is a ‘criminal organisation’ and make control orders in relation to its members. These orders may restrict the ability of members to associate with each other and recruit others to the organisation, and prohibit them from participating in a range of otherwise lawful activities. Overall, the declaration and orders may disrupt and restrict the activities of the organisation.

Despite the concerted efforts of a dedicated unit within the Gangs Squad of the NSW Police Force, which spent over three years preparing applications in preparation for declarations under the 2012 Act, no application has yet been brought to Court. As a result, no organisation has been declared to be a criminal organisation under the scheme. The NSW Police Force advised us that work on these applications ceased in 2015, and that it does not intend to resource such work in the future.

During consultations with our office, operational police advised us that the procedural requirements of the Act are onerous, resource-intensive, and involve difficulties that ultimately prevented police making an application to the Court. The decision to stop working on applications was made against the background that police have been provided with other powers they can more effectively use to target OMCGs and other criminal organisations, such as a modernised consorting offence, expanded
powers to search for firearms, and restrictions on entry to licensed premises by people wearing OMCG ‘colours’ and insignia.

Police in other states and territories have experienced similar difficulties in successfully implementing comparable legislation. No declarations have been made in relation to any organisations.

In my view, given the problems identified by police that have prevented them from exercising the powers under this Act, and the fact that police have alternative powers to disrupt the activities of criminal organisations, it would be in the public interest for the Act to be repealed.

I have made this the only recommendation in my report.

Professor John McMillan AO
Acting Ombudsman

(November 2016)

National’s proposals were not hard policy, they said they were only at a ‘discussion’ stage, but their PR tried to push populist buttons. They seem to have put a lot more work into PR than research.

Or maybe Bridges just doesn’t care as along as he attracts some votes. It’s debatable whether that will succeed, especialy if their propasals unravel.

Leave a comment

92 Comments

  1. Reply
  2. Corky

     /  28th November 2019

    So, apparently these crooks go underground when the heat becomes too much. Hmmm, doesn’t matter how underground they go, they are always around people of some sort.
    What about forming a new group – Citzens Cartel! Plenty of PR to produce paranoia. Have these crooks guessing who is keeping an eye on them. This wouldn’t be Neighbourhood Watch..it would be based on East German protocols of using the public as spies.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  28th November 2019

      That might have worked there, here we have a tradition of despising those who dob others in.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  28th November 2019

      There definitely seems to be something sadistic about some of your lawn order fantasies. Why East Germany – a totalitarian state where disloyalty to a corrupt communist regime was often punished with harassment & torture & innocent people were falsely accused & punished for it by malicious individuals.

      A better model would probably be Singapore.

      Reposted:
      Gezza / 28th November 2019

      No guns at home allowed there. If you want to own one the requirements are stringent; & you have to belong to a gun club & leave it there.

      Singapore has strict laws & punishments for even very minor offences or breaches of civil codes, they’re ALWAYS enforced without fear or favour (even the POTUS famously got ignored when he tried to heavy them out of caning a young yank minor offender), the population’s educated about personal & civic responsibility from a very young age, smacking’s allowed & common at home, fines are very high.

      Drug use is low, punished, & trafficking can get you executed. Everyone knows it.

      Currently 2.3% unemployment; but workers & employees are well-paid, including the police, so that crime & corruption are unnecessary.

      CCTV cameras are everywhere, people are encouraged to report crime immediately & do so without fear of retaliation because the police act on crime reports straight away; offenders are quickly apprehended & punished.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  28th November 2019

        ”There definitely seems to be something sadistic about some of your lawn order fantasies. Why East Germany – a totalitarian state where disloyalty to a corrupt communist regime was often punished with harassment & torture etc.

        The point is it’s an idea. It’s BASED on East German protocols. I doubt using a stock EG approach would work in Aotearoa.

        You know the problem with parliament? It’s peopled by politicians who are incapable of generating ideas for consideration. The general population is the same. Doing the same thing over, and over and over…and expecting exciting new results.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  28th November 2019

          The point is it’s an idea.

          The point is it’s a bad idea. You’re over-promoting your own legend now to the point of becoming absurd. No point in patting yourself on the back for coming up with ideas that are bad or stupid.

          You know the problem with parliament? It’s peopled by politicians who are incapable of generating ideas for consideration.

          Daft as, that one. They have lots of ideas, that’s why there’s always a heavy legislative programme & policy announcements. In fact you’re frequently whining about how bad their ideas are.

          The general population is the same. Doing the same thing over, and over and over…and expecting exciting new results.

          The population gets on with living their lives which includes coming up with ideas good bad and indifferent every day of their lives.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  28th November 2019

            ”The point is it’s a bad idea.”

            The point again is you bring an idea into the material world. That gives it objective reality so it may be examined and debated.

            You straight away choke an idea with your left brain thinking. For example, as I write this the idea has come regarding a centralised CTV network that would be loaded with facial ids of crooks. All shops and businesses could participate.

            Now, I’m no fan of brain storming ( I believe there are better protocols), but look it up. See the point I’m making. Usually, no idea is rejected, no matter how silly.

            Google:

            Brainstorming is a way to generate ideas within a group setting. It is usually used in the beginning stages of a project, where the possibilities for the project are not clearly understood or defined. It provides a quick means for tapping the creativity of a limited number of people for a large number of ideas .”

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Well, obviously. But that’s what the current government has been doing via various werkinggruppes. So you’re happy with their approach & ideas then? If not, why not?

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Corks, I did 34 years in the public service. The last 10 of which were characterised by the Brainstorming approach being used everywhere. Including private businesses. It’s used everywhere. It would be rare to find anyone in any organisation that hasn’t been in one or more brainstorming sessions. They are very useful.

              It’s when you get into detail & work out what could go wrong with each idea or why it won’t work that is the part of the process that a failure to do properly leads to brilliant ideas ending up being disasters or failures.

              That failure too often is caused by lack of time, lack of relevant data, & and insistence from a leader that their idea is to be implemented anyway.

            • Corky

               /  28th November 2019

              No, that’s not brainstorming…that’s a logical approach to problem solving.
              Usually using existing data etc. That’s not to say solutions can’t be found using that method. In fact the world operates that way. But when you have a problem that defies being solved by a logical approach, you need to go way out into left field. Here’s an example of how things may go
              during brainstorming using the way I was taught. We are brainstorming ”controlling crime”.

              Someone says bucket: following on from that.

              1-containment
              2- carry and move
              3-rusty
              4-plastic
              5- liquid
              6- Bucket head
              7- holes
              8- Mitre 10

              Moderator- lets go with Mitre 10

              1- large racks
              2- Garden/ timber departments
              3- security
              4- helpful staff
              5- Stop thief
              6- large selection

              Most of those selections are rubbish. But a couple stand out that can be further brainstormed.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Righto.
              Let’s play then.

              1. How have you defined the problem or issue. “Controlling crime” where?

              2. Which ones have you decided stand out & to further brainstorm?

            • Corky

               /  28th November 2019

              That was just an example. Of course you must start with a well defined problem. The more defined the better.

              Mitre was the one I chose.

              From the Mitre 10 brainstorm:

              Helpful staff and security.

              What if prison officers were always accompanied by a social worker?
              What if helpful staff had their own table in the prisoners mess?

              Even though I was giving no thought to the above posts…notice how ideas started to render down to something more concrete eg security and helpful staff.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              What if prison officers were always accompanied by a social worker?
              What if helpful staff had their own table in the prisoners mess?

              Ok. So far, it appears you think that might help reduce crime in prisons.

            • Corky

               /  28th November 2019

              For the last time..it’s an idea.

              These ideas are open for debate and practicality. Personally, I don’t think it would be a goer, but we may also step off that point and brainstorm again..and again.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Well, ok. You’re teaching me how Brainstorming is done properly, assuming I don’t know how it’s done properly, & that my department didn’t spend thousands employing a business consultant to explains & show us how its done properly.

              So, do you want to step off from that point & brainstorm again & lets see what we end up with?

              Or maybe do you want to define the problem more specifically & then start another brainstorm?

              At what point do you want me to tell you I like an idea & we that can we now examine it in detail, black hat it etc, & then if it stacks up I can ask you for some costings for, say, a pilot?

              Or do you just want to keep throwing ideas out & not be bothered with any of that?

            • Corky

               /  28th November 2019

              What I want to do is close this argument from my end. You say you have done brainstorming before…yet you are talking to me in left brain mode when it should be obvious we aren’t at that stage yet. That’s assuming the examples I had given, had actually been a real brainstorm sessions.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              No I’m not at left brain stage yet. That’s why I asked you if you want to continue brainstorming. But brainstorming is only an idea gathering stage. You end up with tons of ideas, some old, some novel, some good, some bad. This of itself is not of any great value for actually getting anything done in the area of policy or product development to meet objectives & desired outcomes – those are the important things that require hard yards, not inspiration.

              I think you’re right. It is probably a good idea that we stop here. The government’s various werkingruppen will all be doing brainstorming sessions, no doubt you will impressed with their ideas. If not, you can apply some left brain thinking to tell us what’s wrong with them.

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  28th November 2019

    Gangs are a response to making people feel powerless. Politicians don’t want to address that because they exploit it by pretending to be saviours with handouts.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  28th November 2019

      Banal.

      Powerless? Who? The gang members & associates? The community?

      Your solution?

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  28th November 2019

        The kids who grow up in communities where the gang is the only show in town. Nothing banal about that.

        My solution is firstly to promote ownership and property rights so that people have something worth investing in. That is what is hugely missing in these communities.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  28th November 2019

          In practical terms, how do you propose ownership & property rights be promoted to solve the gang problem?

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  28th November 2019

            Gut the building and planning legislation and fund renters to buying their own homes.

            The Left have totally f*cked up this country.

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  28th November 2019

            And this will solve the gang & associates & their intimidation & crime problem? How do you propose to fund their renters to buy their own homes?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              It’s the start. Ownership and property rights means life and investment has a purpose and a hope you can make things better. Without that you may as well just join the most powerful gang. Which is exactly what is happening.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              First get the f*cked up bureaucracy out of the way. Let people subdivide and build as they wish subject only to clear and simple national rules and practical health and safety. Then let money now paid for rent fund mortgage repayments directly instead. Why are these people now paying off other people’s mortgages instead of their own directly?

          • Gezza

             /  28th November 2019

            You didn’t answer my question. What policies are you proposing in answer to my question?

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              Just answered it. I have other things to do as well as put the Left straight.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              So you propose increasing benefits to let gang members buy their state houses?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              Nope, I propose helping poor parents buy their own homes so their children will have stable optimistic and constructive environments and won’t see joining a gang as desirable or their only option.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Ok. How do you propose helping poor parents with very little money to do that?

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Also, how do you propose stopping their kids from wanting to join the local gang because they’re tuff & cool?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              When you own something you have to think and plan. That is a totally different mindset. Kids inherit their parents’ ways of thinking to a considerable extent which is why we have had the growing problem. Tuff and cool will be seen as jailed, smashed up and dead young.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              How do you propose helping poor parents with very little money to do that?

              How do you think the house they live in is funded now? How do you think incentivising them to maintain and improve it will affect that cost?

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              Ok, so you are proposing the housing allowance component of their benefit is converted to a weekly rent-to-buy payment, but not a mortgage?

              Who pays for maintenance & repairs?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              Tenant pays either directly or via offsets to their rent to buy or mortgage. No need for one size fits all.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              So, if they are buying their house with their benefits, why should they change anything else they are currently doing?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              Because they can make it better and know that they and their family will benefit from that. They can make plans and work to carry them out. Stop living and thinking day to day only.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              I like the concept but if buying your house on a benefit is possible what are the odds more people will see getting a benefit & buying a house is the easy way to get a house so why look for a job when you can do that without one?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              I never said it should only or even mainly cater for beneficiaries. It should support all low income families. The more you earn the better and quicker you can enjoy ownership.

            • Gezza

               /  28th November 2019

              I never said it should only or even mainly cater for beneficiaries. It should support all low income families

              No, you’re right. You didn’t. And trying for a 100% solution is not likely to ever be achievable. I think that’s a practical-sounding idea worth the government looking into in more depth, if hasn’t already been.

              Especially if it can be allied with iwi initiatives like this one, from Tainui:

              “Iwi signed a development agreement with HNZ on the $11 million project, which will include a mix of public and private housing. HNZ will build 30 state houses and Waikato-Tainui’s 50 homes will be built by its subsidiary company, Tainui Developments Ltd.

              Waikato-Tainui run home-ownership workshops, and have done for several years, where people learn how to raise a deposit, use Kiwisaver and gain knowledge of the real estate market. “There has been a huge interest by our whānau members around home ownership and increasing the number of homes available for our whānau to enter into,” Flavell said.

              https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/property/107618185/first-home-buyers-only-tribe-keeps-investors-and-agents-out-of-hamilton-development

        • Blazer

           /  28th November 2019

          Sure and look at the cost of homes….Kiwi Dream has been well and truly destroyed by the FIRE economy…fetish.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  28th November 2019

            Dream on, B, until you try to build something yourself – the epitome of why we have the problem.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  28th November 2019

              Tainui had a large number of houses given to them as part of the settlement. One of the local kaumatua wanted these to be sold to lower-income Tainui, possibly as rent to buy. The next thing we knew was that a developer had bought the lot. and was selling them on at market rates. He was driven to go to the press after being roundly criticised, and say that the Tainui bigwigs had approached him, not he them. The people who were renting were still renting and probably still are.

              Bob _—— was furious, but there was nothing he could do about it.

            • Duker

               /  28th November 2019

              Dont know where you got that but this is happening
              ‘https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/property/107618185/first-home-buyers-only-tribe-keeps-investors-and-agents-out-of-hamilton-development’

              Also found Ngati Whatua is paying for free health insurance for its 3000 members through NIB. They are also doing housing development.

              It seems the era of the elite of iwi only benefiting has passed

            • Blazer

               /  28th November 2019

              your eternal motivation is property development.

              Have you been stymied by red tape in developing your block and enriching yourself.

              You do not present as …altruistic.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  28th November 2019

              No, my motivation is helping people and being creative. You wouldn’t understand either I suspect.

            • Duker

               /  29th November 2019

              Subdivide as they wish ?
              Its been done , they are called Favelas or shantytowns.

  4. lurcher1948

     /  28th November 2019

    I hope task force bridges deports those criminals back to australia,from where they came from.

    Reply
  5. Reply
    • Corky

       /  28th November 2019

      Yep, you heard it first from me talking about the Mob controlling streets during funerals. Of course trolls told me I was basically misinformed…and telling lying.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  28th November 2019

        Seems like they are still telling me I’m deluded. In fact there are many gang funerals. Mobsters, as a whole, don’t make old bones. I have witness four Mob funerals this year. You will find many more on Youtube.

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  28th November 2019

      Nigel Latta’s smart-arse remarks like that show up how shallow he often is. Neatly cut off at the knees with that video clip frim Mitchell (who I don’t like much) and a further video clip when you click on that one.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  28th November 2019

        But it seems to effective…riling the Conservatives up. Just like Pete does to me by posting on law and order.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  28th November 2019

          *be*

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  28th November 2019

            There are not that many gang funerals, and all large funerals slow traffic. I go past Taupiri Mountain quite often, and traffic is not infrequently delayed because there is a large funeral there. Occasionally one sees people with patches there in large numbers, but they no more ‘control the street’ than anyone else does.

            Reply
        • Gezza

           /  28th November 2019

          Well that’s not a bad thing. Gang-related intimidation, violence & crime is a major problem in this country, especially among smaller urban & rural communities with high unemployment & beneficiary levels & a high proportion of Maori residents. There HAS to be passionate debate about it; it’s not sufficient just to lock em up or to blame it all on colonialism.

          Reply
  6. lurcher1948

     /  28th November 2019

    Will task force bridges only focus on “people of colour”gangs and/or will it go after white supremacist groups of people who hang out at gun clubs and rightwing blogs who also vote for ACT,New Conservative or national?

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  28th November 2019

      ACT members are all colours (I can’t speak for the New Conservatives) and so are those who vote National.

      There is no connection between any of those and white supremacism, not even (as far as I know) the New Conservatives; that suggestion is a gross insult.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  28th November 2019

      That’s the least of your worries, old timer. The next time you cruise down to the pharmacy to get your meds, make sure you don’t display them in public, because before you can say ‘senior citizen’ you may have red laser dots all over your clothing. Next comes the loud hailer:

      ”Old timer, this is Raptor Squad. Dismount from your vehicle and stand stationary.”

      Your choppers will be chattering a mile a minute, and your tanned strides will take on a darker hue. 😂

      Reply
  7. Zedd

     /  28th November 2019

    Natl are once again proving.. that their MPs/supporters, still have their heads in 1950-70s: TOUGH on crime & DRUGS !!?
    …regardless of any negative societal impact, from such action ie WAR on drugs

    Reply
    • Zedd

       /  28th November 2019

      meanwhile; 1000s still die from, the ‘harmless, legal drugs’: Alcohol & Tobacco..
      BUT hey that’s apparently acceptable to these folks ?!?

      Reply
  8. Zedd

     /  28th November 2019

    I’m just waiting for the antiquated, FPP monster (Natl) to start showing, its cracks.. potentially 3 pieces: small bus. BIG bus. & farmers; Its 2019 folks

    Reply
  9. Zedd

     /  28th November 2019

    Whats next: attacking REDS/commies under the Bed.. again…. 😀

    Reply
  10. Gezza

     /  28th November 2019

    The biggest problem with National’s law & order policies is the notable lack of detail which makes it impossible to gauge whether it stands any chance of long term success & while it proposes both a carrot & stick approach to gangs, crime, punishment & rehabilitation, based on National’s track record, because they are always looking to cut taxes for votes, they’ll underfund the lot. Leading to nothing improving at all.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  28th November 2019

      Bridges problem is he generates low expectations. Compare him to Boris or even JK.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  28th November 2019

        Bridges’ biggest problem is the sound of his voice & his demeanour. I can’t quite put my finger on what is wrong with his demeanour but between that & his awful, nasally whining voice, that grates on the ear, the less one hears from him the better seems to cover it for a lot folk.

        Reply
    • duperez

       /  28th November 2019

      For you the lack of detail could be the biggest problem with National’s law & order policies but not for most people. Anyone wanting to make a proper analysis would need detail but this is for headlines, this is for soundbites. And this is testing the waters to see reactions to the headlines from the great unwashed. The reaction from experts and those who do deep analysis and ask searching questions is only important in how it impacts the response of TGU.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  28th November 2019

        Yeah I think we all know that. But the same situation applies to the government’s approaches. I think NZ has a fairly unique situation in terms of the size & spread of the gang problem, its association with violence & intimidation (not always connected with drugs – as in Mexico) & its concentration of Maori & the link the gangs exploit via whanaungatanga & the anti-pakeha-colonial tuff warrior image. It makes it difficult to combat its attractiveness to Maori youth.

        Reply
  11. Gezza

     /  28th November 2019

    We may have begun reaching the height of absurdity.

    The Waikato Mongrel Mob Kingdom says planned changes to gun legislation are racist, undemocratic and poorly thought out.

    It made a submission to Parliament’s Finance and Expenditure Committee in Hamilton on Thursday.

    It was the first time the Waikato Mongrel Mob Kingdom had made a submission to a select committee.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12289324

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  28th November 2019

      It was easy to take the comments of their PR woman Louise Hutchinson as an acknowledgement that they have guns which fit the description of the semi-automatic and other firearms to be prohibited.
      And easy to say they need them for hunting I suppose. She didn’t say what they hunt though

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  29th November 2019

        Saw her doing a 3 news interview last night. What a white middlclass fool. Honestly. However, if I remember correctly, she said they will comply with the arms amnesty.

        Bullshit. What will happen is this:

        The Sergeant In Arms will call in all firearms ( at a rural destination.No patches). They will decide what will be sacrificed to the amnesty. Most large chapters have a least 4 semis. One of those semis will also be sacrificed. Probably the one worst for wear. All serial numbers will be removed.

        That just leaves the acting part. They will find their most glib tongued remember to return said arms. The korero will go something like this.

        Fark, some white fulla kills those mossies and we all have to hand in our weapons. Man, we hunt and have to protect ourselves.

        Policeman: Sir, your guns aren’t registered and you have no license to own firearms.

        Fark, well it’s an amnesty, so we are doing the right thing. Besides, I don’t care what the fugging law says, I’m going to defend myself against an arsehole ( derogatory: Black Power)

        KIA KAHA …ARRRRGH. SIEG HEIL !!!!!!

        Policeman to colleague: It must have been hard for those boys to hand their weapons in.

        Gangbanger as he walks away smirking : Farking baldheads ( derogatory: white person)

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  29th November 2019

          Dream on.

          Policeman to colleague: What a load of BS. Wonder where all the others are & when we’ll get the ok to go looking for them.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  29th November 2019

            Really? I’ll go with my scenario. Especially if Jacinda gets back in. I’m sure no harden cop will be fooled. But the recruits over the last ten years..far too culturally indoctrinated.

            Talking of that, I watched Crimewatch last night. Seems the PC brigade has given it the once over. Race identification doesn’t happen now. That’s understandable given all you see is Maori, Maori and Maori. And they have also blacked out the faces of offenders. If you can’t look into a ferals eyes you can’t get a handle on what’s going through their mind. Last time I will ever watch that programme.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  29th November 2019

              Really? I’ll go with my scenario. Especially if Jacinda gets back in. I’m sure no harden cop will be fooled. But the recruits over the last ten years..far too culturally indoctrinated.

              When would you ever not go with your scenarios? The recruits over the last ten years might possibly receive more training in cultural awareness but I’m pretty sure the first few months on the mean streets of South Auckland & in gang-dominated rural communities sees their cultural education appropriately extended by on-the-job experience.

  12. Corky

     /  29th November 2019

    Willie Jackson helps National to power come the next election..

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/11/ihum-tao-national-would-have-dragged-those-m-oris-out-by-the-throat-willlie-jackson.html

    Pania Newton isn’t a smart girl. Labour doesn’t like you, Pania. They despise Maori because they are trouble with a capital T. You should read this blog. If you had, you would have learn’t even teacher dislike Maori and think they are simpletons ( I don’t know the right word to use).
    Of course, the teachers need a little piss to get them talkative. And when that happens, that taonga around their necks doesn’t mean jack.

    *** ”You should read this blog.” My comments on this blog.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/11/jacinda-ardern-accused-of-tokenism-amid-revelation-she-ignored-advice-to-visit-ihum-tao.html

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  29th November 2019

      Your 1st Newshub article:
      29 Oct 2019, Dan Satherly
      Ardern told Newshub on Thursday she “absolutely” will visit, but getting “some resolution” is more important. Only a third of Kiwis in a recent Newshub-Reid Research poll believe she should have visited the site by now.

      Your 2nd Newshub article:
      28 Nov 2019, Tova O’Brien
      In Newshub’s last Newshub-Reid Research Poll, voters were asked if they think the Prime Minister should have visited Ihumātao earlier. While most – 56.2 percent – said “no”, one-third of New Zealanders – 32 percent – said “yes” she should have visited earlier.

      Poor PM. Two different angles from the same low-rent infotainment source. Newshub damns her if she does & damns her if she doesn’t.

      Awkward for Willy tho. When it all kicked off he was all nothing to do with Jacinda or the government; it’s a perfectly acceptable done deal with the iwi.”

      Now it’s all down to the government to solve it.

      Mind you, Willy’s always been all mouth & no substance on lots of issues.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  29th November 2019

        I think perception is everything. It’s what Maori think in my opinion, not what or what maybe
        the PM will do, that is the important take home message. And Labour has a history of expecting Maori support for little in return. National has been far more accommodating.
        Pania Newton is just one of a long line of Maori to find this out.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  29th November 2019

          She has a pretty solid phalanx of Maori advisers in te Maori caucus. She’s run smack into the classic problem of some mana whenua Maori wanted the deal to go ahead & some – including a lot of unconnected manuhiri & young ones like Pania – don’t. Like the Nga Puhi claim. They can’t agree via tikanga Maori & kaupapa Maori & ezch side refuses to meet the other halfway.Te Maori King ran into the same problem & bailed out with great gravitas saying the government should sort it.

          The PM, like her predecessors, will be taking her Maori advisers advice on this & that advice will most likely be don’t visit & meet with the riff raff. Show up only when the issue’s resolved & your mana won’t be dented.

          Reply
  13. Gezza

     /  29th November 2019

    Friday. Just got back from picking up a repeat prescription from my pharmacist’s in Tawa.

    They have two automatic slider doors giving access/egress there. One to the Main Street, the other one just round the corner in a pedestrian plaza. A sign on the Main Street door said this door was now locked “for Security Reasons” and to use the other door.

    “Hey guys.” 👍🏼 “Hi Gez”.

    “Why’s your other door locked? Has something happened?”

    “Yes. We had an incident here yesterday, two Mongrel Mob members came in & tried to rob the place. In broad daylight. Wearing skeleton masks. Only two female staff were here. They were brazen as anything.”

    “Jesus. You contacted the police?”

    “Yeah, they got them.”

    There’s a big male staff member on duty there today.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  29th November 2019

      Silly pharmcist, ant security review years ago would have said don’t have a discrete side door unless you are a porn shop.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  29th November 2019

        Weird but typically snide comment, based on an incorrect assumption by the look of it. Both doors are perfectly discrete – did you mean discreet? They’re both equally open to passing foot traffic. It’s a busy little shopping precinct. And actually I’ve just remembered that neither door’s an automatic one, you have to slide them both open.

        Reply

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