Words of the year – 2019

There’s  variety of words of the year.

Oxford Languages:

The Word of the Year 2019 is

CLIMATE EMERGENCY

‘a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.’

Analysis of language data collected in the Oxford Corpus shows the rapid rise of climate emergency from relative obscurity to becoming one of the most prominent – and prominently debated – terms of 2019.

Runners up:

  • Climate action
    Actions taken by an individual, organization, or government  to reduce or counteract the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse  gases, in order to limit the effect of global warming on the earth’s climate
  • Climate crisis
    A situation  characterized by the threat of highly dangerous, irreversible changes to the  global climate
  • Climate denial
    The rejection of the proposition that climate change caused by human activity is occurring or that it constitutes a significant threat to human welfare and civilisation
  • Eco-anxiety
    Extreme worry about current and future harm to the environment caused by human activity and climate change
  • Ecocide
    Destruction of the natural environment by deliberate or negligent human action
  • Extinction
    The fact or process of a species, family, or other group of animals or plants becoming extinct
  • Flight shame
    A reluctance to travel by air, or discomfort at doing so, because of the damaging emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants by aircraft
  • Global heating
    A term adopted in place of ‘global warming’ to convey the seriousness of changes in the climate caused by human activity and the urgent need to address it
  • Net-zero
    A target of completely negating the amount of greenhouse gases produced by human activity, to be achieved by reducing emissions and implementing methods of absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere
  • Plant-based
    (Of food or a diet) consisting largely of vegetables, grains, pulses, or other foods derived from plants, rather than animal products

There’s  bit of  theme there. Obviously there has been substantially more interest in climate related issues this year.

Meriam Webster:

they

Our Word of the Year for 2019 is they. It reflects a surprising fact: even a basic term—a personal pronoun—can rise to the top of our data. Although our lookups are often driven by events in the news, the dictionary is also a primary resource for information about language itself, and the shifting use of they has been the subject of increasing study and commentary in recent years. Lookups for they increased by 313% in 2019 over the previous year.

Also:

  • Quid pro quo
    We define quid pro quo as “something given or received for something else,” and “a deal arranging a quid pro quo.” The literal translation from New Latin is “something for something.”
  • Impeach
    “to charge (a public official) before a competent tribunal with misconduct in office”
  • Crawdad
    Delia Owens, the first-time novelist whose Where the Crawdads Sing made it to the top of the New York Times bestseller list, was interviewed on CBS Sunday Morning, sending crawdad to the top of our searches with a spike of 1,200%.
    Crawdad is used mostly west of the Appalachians to refer to the aquatic animal that looks like a small lobster and lives in rivers and streams—that is, to what’s also known as a crawfish or crayfish.
  • Egrerious
    “conspicuously bad”
  • Clemency
    “willingness or ability to moderate the severity of a punishment (such as a sentence)” and “an act or instance of mercy, compassion, or forgiveness.”
  • The
    The Ohio State University filed a trademark application in August for the word the with the U.S. Patent Office, in order to protect new branding logos that emphasize the “The” that is part of the official (some say pretentious) name of the institution—and the spiked 500%.
  • Snitty
    Snitty flew to the top of the dictionary lookups in May, increasing by 150,000%, when Attorney General William Barr used the word to describe a letter sent to him by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.
  • Tergiversation
    “evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement,” or “desertion of a cause, position, party, or faith”
  • Camp
    …what inspired the lookups: a gala event celebrating “Camp: Notes on Fashion,” the newly-opened fashion exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • Exculpate
    The word exculpate is defined as “to clear from alleged fault or guilt.” It traces back to Latin culpa, meaning “blame,” also the source of culpable, which means “meriting condemnation or blame especially as wrong or harmful.”

That list looks very USA orientated.

Dictionary.com

existential

“of or relating to existence” or

“concerned with the nature of human existence as determined by the individual’s freely made choices.” First recorded by the early 1900s, this existential is related to existentialism, a philosophy that affirms our individual agency in making meaningful, authentic choices about our lives.

Notable among searches was existential, which we’ve chosen as our Word of the Year for 2019. It captures a sense of grappling with the survival—literally and figuratively—of our planet, our loved ones, our ways of life.

Runner-up word:

Nonbinary

Searches for nonbinary itself trended throughout the year after several celebrities publicly identified themselves as nonbinary, including singer Sam Smith and Queer Eye star Jonathan Van Ness. So did searches about another area of increasing visibility and inclusion in culture in 2019: diversity of sexual orientation. The terms omnisexual and pansexual, which can express sexual attraction to or activity with people of any sexual orientation gender identity, trended, for example, after Bella Thorne shared about their sexuality in the media.

There is a local word of the year which is quite lame in comparison.

Public Address:

OK Boomer

Public Address readers have chosen “OK Boomer” as their Word of the Year for 2019, causing emergency support services to scramble in anticipation of a wave of injured feelings among New Zealanders over 55.

“I’m really terribly sorry this has happened and I just hope the system can cope with what’s coming as a result,” says Public Address owner Russell Brown. “I mean, you saw what happened after Chloe Swarbrick dropped an ‘OK Boomer’ in Parliament – it was carnage. There were feelings injuries recorded on the other side of the world!

“I implore those affected to please just stay in the house you own until someone can get to you – if there’s more than one, try and pick the one that renters aren’t living in. Please also be aware that if you run out of food there’s an 0800 number you can call and there’ll be someone on the line to explain to you what Uber Eats is.

“I’m technically possibly a Boomer myself, so I understand the pain and confusion people will be feeling over this. Just know that we’ll get through it together.”

That blurb is even more lame than the term, which was used once on Parliament and then got a bit of publicity in some parts of social media.

It’s a fairly petty and some say divisive word. Chloe just used it as an off the cuff retort in an exchange in Parliament, but it was picked up on and promoted by some who seemed to think it trendy to dump on a demographic.

  1. OK Boomer
  2. They Are Us
  3. Ihumātao
  4. Reeferendum
  5. As-Salaam-Alaykum
  6. Climate Emergency

This list isn’t representative of Aotearoa, it was suggested and discussed and voted on by a niche left wing blog so is derived quite differently than the major word companies of the world.

Leave a comment

83 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  20th December 2019

    Clearly Public Address readers are a tiny bubble mostly in the Pt Chev- Grey Lynn area, reachable by bike.
    As-Salaam-Alaykum …peace be with you – yes I had to look it up. – I dont think they will know that word around London Bridge

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  20th December 2019

      That is akin to Shalom Aleichem, peace be with you.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  20th December 2019

        Ignorant PDTs are either antiSemites or don’t know that that’s Hebrew and is the response to Shalom. Or both.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  20th December 2019

          The literal translation of ‘quid pro quo is ‘what in return for where.’

          Reply
  2. lurcher1948

     /  20th December 2019

    Two words which will have the more feral rightwingers pulling whats left of their hair out…….Behrouz-Boochani
    this will become a saying for justice, respect and freedom from racist australia

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  20th December 2019

      Lurchy…have you been sniffing trifle again?

      This guy is probably a good person. But we must show Australia that even though we are a weak, wet liberal country, we will stand up against que jumpers and blatant rule breakers.

      Let’s show Australia we aren’t believers in Jacinda’s vision of rainbows, waterfalls and unending love for strangers.

      Reply
      • lurcher1948

         /  20th December 2019

        Corky im feeling you are lacking Christian charity,boy you have a personality problem,IM 71 yo and spit on your agism

        try being nice
        life is beautiful

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  20th December 2019

          James Brown..the old soul crooner. Son, here is real jive with my aunty dancing”

          Reply
  3. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  20th December 2019

    As the year hasn’t finished, you can still submit suggestions to the American Dialect Society for their 2019 Word of the Year.
    https://www.americandialect.org/woty

    Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  20th December 2019

    The Word of the Year 2019 is
    CLIMATE EMERGENCY

    that is of course 2 WORDS.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  20th December 2019

      Its earlier versions were 2 words ….Global warming, climate change…now climate emergency….same old same old.
      Its such fun pretending to solve future problems and ignore existing ones, mirrors the rise of so called ‘e-sports’

      Reply
    • I think you will find that there are quite a few two word entries in dictionaries.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  20th December 2019

        Not as headwords.

        Shop steward or shop floor will be under ‘shop’.

        Reply
  5. David

     /  20th December 2019

    What a load of woke twaddle. On the plus side Greta has been named in the top 10 scientists science awards by Nature, well deserved for her ground breaking stuff.

    Reply
  6. Conspiratoor

     /  20th December 2019

    and a little closer to home, it’s the millennial who has to terminate every exchange with ‘Perfect’. Of no matter if the experience falls well short of perfection

    Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  20th December 2019

    Greta who?

    Reply
    • seer

       /  20th December 2019

      Yet again President Putin gets it right –
      from http://en.kremlin.ru/events/president/news/61704

      Keir Simmons: Mr President, what did you make of Greta Thunberg? President Trump said – tweeted I think – that she seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. People took that to be patronising. What did you make of Greta Thunberg at the United Nations?

      Vladimir Putin: I may disappoint you, but I do not share the general enthusiasm about Greta Thunberg’s action. You know, it is a good thing when young people and teenagers focus on today’s serious problems, including environmental issues, and they certainly need to be supported. But when others use children and adolescents for their own purposes, it is a practice that deserves condemnation. It is especially wrong to try to make money like this. I am not claiming that this is the case, but it certainly should be monitored.

      No one seems to have explained to Greta that the modern world is complex and diverse and rapidly developing, and people in Africa or in many Asian countries want to live at the same level of prosperity as in Sweden. But how can this be achieved? By making them use solar energy because Africa gets so much sun? Has anyone explained to her how much this would cost?

      A colleague was just talking about oil. Everyone probably knows that oil is the number one source in the global energy balance and it will retain its advantages as such over the next 25 years. This is what international experts say. True, its role will gradually diminish; true, renewable energy will grow faster. This is all true, and we must strive for this. But is this technology affordable for emerging economies and developing countries right now? Barely, but people want to live there just like in Sweden, and this cannot be stopped. Explain to them that they still have to live in poverty for 20–30 more years and their children will be living in poverty – explain this to them.

      These things do require a professional approach. Of course, emotions are inevitable, but still, if we want to be effective, we must be professional. I am sure that Greta is a kind and very sincere girl, but it is up to adults to try to avoid leading teenagers and children into extreme situations; it is up to adults to protect them from unnecessary emotions that can destroy a personality – this is what I wanted to say.

      Overall, of course, we should definitely support these ideas concerning the development of renewable energy sources, only we need to rely on reality. And, pushing this process – I have just explained in my remarks how we do it in Russia – we not only signed the Paris agreements and are completing their implementation, but we took steps, domestically, to limit emissions and develop alternative sources. We do this, among other things, through tax regulation, offering incentives for the development of alternative energy sources. We also continue to develop gas as the purest hydrocarbon.

      But, again, using children and adolescents to achieve even such noble goals, exerting such strong emotional pressure – I consider it wrong.

      https://mashable.com/video/greta-thunberg-heavy-metal-remix/

      Reply
  8. seer

     /  20th December 2019

    I propose that a contender for “cliche of the year” is “moving forward”.

    Reply
  9. Egrerious??

    Reply
    • Maggy Wassilieff

       /  20th December 2019

      Yep, it’s an egregious spelling mistake to make.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  20th December 2019

        Maggy, I have three books about the OED and one or two about Johnson’s dictionary.

        Both quote some marvellous words;anatiferous (producing ducks), fopdoodle (self-explanatory) and suppedaneous (placed under the feet) from Dr Johnson.

        The OED has anectis (the place on the back that can’t be reached to be scratched), preantepenultimate (third to last), cacchinator (I knew that cacchination was loud and immoderate laughter, but hadn’t heard of a cacchinator), usanimous (equal to another in stupidity) and so on and so on…..

        Reply
  10. Patricia

     /  20th December 2019

    How Dare You!

    Reply
  11. my fave of 2019: ‘Reeferendum’
    BUT it will happen in 2020 🙂

    Reply
  12. Corky

     /  20th December 2019

    My favourite word of the year: [ Deleted PG] ‘Deleted’ is my word of the year for those still in a state of wonder.😃✔ It’s also appose for the upcoming election.

    Reply
    • Maggy Wassilieff

       /  20th December 2019

      It’s also appose for the upcoming election.

      appose is not a very apposite word to employ in that sentence.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  20th December 2019

        I gave it my best shoot.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  20th December 2019

          Damn America translations.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  20th December 2019

            Foreigners, Corks. Strange folk, foreigners. 😐

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  20th December 2019

              Yes.. it’s bad enough having one grammar Nazi. Now we have two.

              Talking of strangers, a ratepayer building in my area has just had paintwork and murals done. The mural has a Maori wahine with a moko looking at a Muslim woman wearing a Hijab. Not one nod to European culture..not a fugging thing.

        • Conspiratoor

           /  20th December 2019

          Cultural issues aside the mural’s not a bad effort corks. I would have been tempted to paint the white woman in the window. Waddya reckon?

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  20th December 2019

            Does it exist, then ? Where is it ?

            Reply
            • Conspiratoor

               /  20th December 2019

              Exactly as corky described. Ill put it up later, unless someone else does so beforehand. Meantime how about you provide one shred of evidence for any of your own fantasies. Take your pick, im not fussy

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  20th December 2019

              He didn’t say where it was. He has said many things that don’t stand up to scrutiny, like his niece whose van was given an annual service and free tyres by WINZ who also paid for her petrol and her children’s school uniforms and other things.

              I don’t fantasise and expect other people to believe the fantasies.

              Please name some of my supposed fantasies.

            • Conspiratoor

               /  20th December 2019

              I’ll leave it to corky to disclose the location if he wishes

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  20th December 2019

              It’s unfortunate that when someone says so much that isn’t true, one tends to disbelieve them when they say something that is. It seems that this time Corky was telling the truth.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  20th December 2019

              Not hard to find. Painted by a white woman.

            • Corkky

               /  20th December 2019

              Be my guest, Conspirator. Tell everyone where it is. But before you do, might pay to read my original comment again.

              I suppose I should have used rohe, but that wouldn’t have been much fun.

              ”The Māori people of New Zealand use the word rohe to describe the territory boundaries of iwi (tribes), although some divide their rohe into several takiwā. The areas shown on the map (right) are indicative only, and some iwi areas may overlap.”

            • Corky

               /  20th December 2019

              ps- Happy Xmas, guys.

            • Corky

               /  20th December 2019

              Time for Kitty to shut up…time for me to put up.

              Kitty Catkin / 20th December 2019

              ”He didn’t say where it was. He has said many things that don’t stand up to scrutiny, like his niece whose van was given an annual service and free tyres by WINZ who also paid for her petrol and her children’s school uniforms and other things.””

              What you can get?

              https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/products/a-z-benefits/advance-payment-of-benefit.html#null

              Quote:

              How much you get depends on your situation and what you need help with.

              Examples of costs we can help with are:

              ambulance subscription fees
              appliances and furniture
              attendance at funerals and tangihanga
              bedding
              beds, chairs and tables
              bonds and rents
              car repairs
              child carseat
              clothing
              dental treatment
              dentures and hearing aids
              electricity, gas and water
              essential home repairs
              fire loss or burglary
              fridges, freezers and washing machines
              glasses
              laser therapy to remove birthmarks
              safety footware
              school costs
              school stationery
              school uniforms
              tenancy tribunal fees
              travel if you’re stranded.

              If you’re not sure whether we can help, talk with us about your situation.

            • Corky

               /  21st December 2019

              Apologies- that should have been posted in Open Forum.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  21st December 2019

              The niece was supposedly working, the van was supposedly given an annual service and new tyres and free petrol…In fact, loans are made for emergency repairs, not routine maintenance.

              These things are loans, not gifts and need to be paid back. They are not, as Corky made out, routine payments for these things. I said at the time that they were loans made under special circumstances and quoted things like the service that WINZ specified were never paid for.

            • Corky

               /  21st December 2019

              Poor, Kitty. Posting like a headless chook…and still making up bs. I said my niece was starting work after attending a conference for solo mums.

              Her car was serviced, had new tyres added she was given a clothes chit and other stuff. All of this was FREE. That went for all other solo mums at the conference.

              I later re checked with my niece after Kitty accused me of lying.

              My niece corrected me about the tyres. She would have to make a part payment or pay for them outright. I can’t remember.

              Also Kitty needs to be advised, given the sheltered existence her comments seem to hint at,. that at the moment, it’s Xmas time at Winz.
              I know of more than a few beanies who are reaping the benefits of a Labour government – multiple food grants; furniture and power bill help. All free and nothing exceptional about there circumstance.

              She needs to stop posting about things she KNOWS NOTHING ABOUT, and accept her lumps in good grace. 😂

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  21st December 2019

            They are also one-offs and there is no guarantee that they will be granted.

            Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  21st December 2019

            If Corks believes that or pretends to, there’s no point in trying to convince him otherwise. I can’t help wondering why the WINZ site says the opposite. but he must know better than they do; they just run the place. They say that these things are loans that must be paid back, but what do they know about it ?

            For some bizarre reason they even say this at the beginning of the link he posted.

            If Corky thinks that a loan is the same as a present, he may find that few people want to lend him anything.

            If food grants are ‘multiple’ (a contender for cliche of the year) and handed out as freely as he claims, why did he say that the man who rammed WINZ had been refused one ?

            Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  21st December 2019

            If you must use the old, old lumps cliche….do check its meaning.

            Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  20th December 2019

        Cliche of the century, not just the year; grammar Nazi (or Nazi used in any sense except the genuine one) This just shows that the user has either no knowledge of history or no respect for the 10,000,000 people murdered by the Nazis.

        Surely no one would translate apposite as appose.

        Where is the mural ? Do provide a link or photo 😀

        Reply
    • Zedd

       /  20th December 2019

      bleep.. blank.. er 😀

      Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  20th December 2019

      2014 ? Has this offensive cliche been around since then ?

      I suppose that it saves the unoriginal the effort of finding an original thing to say. Alas, they tend to flog these things to death because they haven’t the imagination to think of anything of their own.

      Reply
      • Maggy Wassilieff

         /  21st December 2019

        I read the Guardian grammar article by Rosie Drifill and discovered it was psychobabbly… and no wonder, the poor girl is a vegan psychotherapist.
        O spare me… (a nice bit of steak).

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  21st December 2019

          Glad you got the point.

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  21st December 2019

          ”Language pedants should ask themselves what really drives them in their policing efforts: genuine concern for sliding standards or a sinisterly hidden form of one-upmanship?”

          I think one-upmanship, a bit of bullying, a feeling of inadequacy and, well, you have to try anything when you can’t bring an opponent down. Such folk are simply wankers.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  21st December 2019

            I might even have the record here for typos, I often do my best proofreading AFTER posting.

            I’m not really a grammar nazi but sometimes I will point out a wrong word or incorrect usage, especially if it’s to someone who’s otherwise a good communicator. I don’t mind if someone does it to me. I learn from it.

            Reply
            • Maggy Wassilieff

               /  21st December 2019

              Exactly.
              Grammar is the means by which we communicate effectively.

              In the case above, I read a sentence with a word I had never seen before… appose.

              1. Was it a word I could add to my vocabulary?
              2. Had the writer made a typo – oppose or opposed – and left out some other words in the sentence?
              3. Had the writer meant apposite, which seemed to make sense?

              So I wrote a phrase illustrating a possible solution.

              Take it or leave it…. having some basic 5th form knowledge of English grammar has done me no $$$$$$$$$harm through the years.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  21st December 2019

              If someone’s grammar and spelling fall below a certain standard, they become unintelligible and nonsensical.

              Cork’s abuse simply shows that he is insecure about those better educated, more articulate and better informed than he is and has to result to personal abuse to assert his superiority.

            • Corky

               /  21st December 2019

              So, what does appose mean, seeing you have 5th form grammar?

              And please don’t take this personally…but I don’t correct other peoples grammar and I would be happy if you wouldn’t correct mine.
              It’s just a respect thing. Good manners and breeding. Have a quiet chuckle if you like…I won’t hold it against you.

              Now, you make a fair point, grammar is communication. If you come across one of my posts that doesn’t make sense, or is grammatically incorrect, ignore it. Why waste your precious time….unless?

              I do that with Luchy’s posts. If he’s having a bad day I ignore his posts.
              I don’t waste my time on them.

            • Maggy Wassilieff

               /  21st December 2019

              Now I have a conflict… Your first sentence asks me about the meaning of appose (which I have now ascertained).

              Then your penultimate paragraph instructs me to ignore your posts if they don’t make sense.

              So, I’m going 50:50 by not ignoring your post, but leaving you to find the meaning of appose yourself.

            • Gezza

               /  21st December 2019

              Yeah, that’s what I tend to do too, Maggy. Is that a wrong word or a valid one I don’t know? I write a lot more informally now than I used to. I like to play with the language at times.

              “Where’s my book?” in typical everyday Kiwi is often expressed by many as “Where’s me book?” Sometimes I’ll even type it that way if I’m talking about things in typical country lad Kiwi vernacular.

              What makes things complex if one wants to get prissy about UK English grammar is that English has always been a dynamic language with a massive vocabulary & while grammar’s necessary for precision & intelligibility the language is becoming heavily influenced by American definitions, usages, spelling & phrases.

              I no longer rail against it like I used to because it’s inevitable.

              But it produces some intriguing opposites & nonsense phrases.

              UK English phrases can get turned around & yet have the same intended meaning.

              “I couldn’t care less”, meaning this is so unimportant to me I don’t care; In fact I care so little (zero care, baby) it’s impossible to care less.

              Many Americans say it as “I could care less”, meaning this is so unimportant to me I don’t care. But I can’t figure out the logic of that one. Because to me that means you DO care, but you could care less.

              And classic colloquial Americanisms like: “I ain’t got no money”, make me smile.
              We all know it means “I have not got (any) money”. But grammatically, it means “I have not got no money”. Which logically means you must HAVE SOME money.

              But you can find the same thing with a lot of informal UK expressions depending on the common usage & local dialect, even in different parts of London.

              Grammar & spelling rules are still needed as standards to stop the English language changing beyond intelligibility.

            • Corky

               /  21st December 2019

              ”Now I have a conflict… Your first sentence asks me about the meaning of appose (which I have now ascertained).”

              Please read my post above and apply your intelligence (?)

            • Corky

               /  21st December 2019

              appose in American English
              1. to put side by side; place opposite or near. 2. Archaic. to put or apply (something) to another thing.

  13. Gezza

     /  21st December 2019

    appose
    verb
    place (something) side by side with or close to something else.
    “the specimen was apposed to X-ray film”

    Imo, the problem is not one of grammar. It’s the apparent use of a wrong word.

    “My favourite word of the year: [ Deleted PG] ‘Deleted’ is my word of the year for those still in a state of wonder.😃✔ It’s also appose for the upcoming election.”

    My assumption was that you meant to use apposite, because I can’t make sense of that sentence from the definition of appose, but I can with “apposite – meaning apt in the circumstances or in relation to something.”

    It makes the intended meaning unclear, & in communication the onus for clarity rests with the person trying to convey the message.

    Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  21st December 2019

      G, I don’t think anyone knows what corky meant, especially corky. I think he was still pissing himself over the first line and the second one just went a little sideways. But if I was to hazard a guess it was an attempt at ‘appropo’ since it’s the only word that seems to fit the context. What say you oh wise one?

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  21st December 2019

        The wise one says anybody who wants to paint a mural on glass and expect it to last years after the window cleaners have been over it…is, well, a clown. 😃

        Reply
        • Conspiratoor

           /  21st December 2019

          Agreed, just like the Einstein who suddenly decides to change his moniker to Corkky because hes afraid the bros might try to join the dots…

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  21st December 2019

            Geez 😃. That fooled em, eh? That’s an uptick.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  21st December 2019

              Well, it didn’t fool your main target but Timoti disappeared around when I arrived & I’ve mostly just posted to Corky so it wasn’t something I’ve bothered about.

  14. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  21st December 2019

    That’s my point, exactly.

    But never mind…

    I thought this was a forum
    for debating, informing and getting feedback from anyone who is interested in participating.

    Reason, Reasonable, Robust
    https://yournz.org/about/

    but perhaps not, eh?

    Reply
  15. Corky

     /  21st December 2019

    It is Maggie. It’s about respect. Tell me – what does a good boss do should he need to reprimand an employee? What are bad bosses known for doing in similar circumstances?

    I posted what ”appose ” means. What do you think?

    Reply
    • Maggy Wassilieff

       /  21st December 2019

      We are on a post about Words.

      I get your point…
      I am a WANKER

      RESPECT.
      YEAH

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  21st December 2019

        Maggy, using your own quote:

        ”I thought this was a forum
        for debating, informing and getting feedback from anyone who is interested in participating”

        I told you what I thought of people who correct others grammar. That is my honestly held opinion. Geeza has another opinion.

        You have told me between the lines what you think of me…fine.

        Now, did you read my post about what appose means?

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  21st December 2019

      It is Maggie. It’s about respect.

      Ok, so spelling Maggy’s name correctly is also about respect where I hail from.

      Tell me – what does a good boss do should he need to reprimand an employee? What are bad bosses known for doing in similar circumstances?

      Bad bosses are known for many things but berating or dressing an employee in front of others is one thing they are known for doing. If that’s what you are getting at here, with respect, it’s not the same thing.

      This is more like a meeting, where somebody is querying something someone up the front has just said because it’s unclear what they mean.

      Where the answer is “what do you think I mean?” said arrogantly or defensively, this is a hostile an invitation to discuss it.

      When the unclear speaker then attempts to imply the questioner isn’t using their intelligence, or they would know what they mean, is where a lot of the audience see that the person up front has made a cock up & not only doesn’t know it but refuses to accept it.

      I posted what ”appose ” means. What do you think?

      I think you’ve used a verb where you should have used a noun (probably apposite, but who knows?) And so therefore your exact meaning was & still is unclear because you have not posted a synonym or the word you used in another sentence to make its meaning clearer.

      I think your ego is too strong for you to accept that you’ve just used a wrong word because you consider yourself to be highly intelligent & that would not fit your self-image. Rather than clarify what you meant another way yourself you are finding ways to attack your critics & if you can’t belittle their intelligence you can belittle their motives.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  21st December 2019

        😮

        *Bad bosses are known for many things but berating or dressing *down*!!! an employee…

        (Bad bosses dressing employees could be a whole other problem … let’s not even go there! 😀)

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  21st December 2019

          And I’ll correct myself, after checking. Apposite is an adjective, not a noun.

          You’ve used a rather obscure verb instead of an adjective; but the point is that your sentence has therefore ended up so confusing nobody can be entirely certain exactly what you meant.

          Reply

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